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Gene Krupa

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1990 | By Richard Fuller, Special to The Inquirer
You could always tell when the cowboy was singing at my old movie theater, because most of us kids headed up the aisle to the candy counter. A similar exodus occurred when a movie dropped into a nightclub and the band started playing. There was an exception, however, when this guy with wild hair started playing his drums with such outer-space zeal, such manic energy, that all of us sat back down, mouths agape. The guy clearly was no mere earthling. He was Gene Krupa, and he was, as fellow drummer Cozy Cole observes, "responsible for making the drums a solo instrument.
NEWS
June 17, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BY HIS OWN admission, Russ Connor was something of a wild man in his youth. There was the time he and some buddies commandeered a trolley to drive them from dry Ocean City, N.J., to wet Somers Point for a night of intemperance. He once raced his Pontiac GTO full-out on an unopened section of the Atlantic City Expressway, not the safest venture even on a vacant road. His expenses and his caprices were paid for at least in part by the $20 weekly check he got from the government as a returning GI. He was an Army veteran of World War II. Donald Russell Connor, who went from his carefree years to the sober world of banking, working his way up to vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, a jazz buff who wrote four books on Benny Goodman and became pals with drummer Gene Krupa, died Wednesday at age 92. He was one of the original homeowners in Levittown.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1993 | By Karl Stark, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The earth tended to shake when Gene Krupa mounted a drum set. But that was only part of his legend. Krupa is the rare musician who possessed more charisma than the tinsel star, Sal Mineo, who portrayed him in a 1959 film biography. "That's probably the only instance, now that I think of it, in which the original was better-looking than the actor who played him," remarks comedian and pianist Steve Allen, who narrates an hour-long video Gene Krupa: Jazz Legend, recently released on DCI Music Video.
NEWS
September 11, 1998 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Bruce H. Klauber fell in love with the drums while watching Gene Krupa on Ed Hurst's "Summertime at the Pier" television show back in 1959. "I couldn't believe it," Klauber recalled. "It looked like the guy was going wild and getting paid for it. " Klauber, 46, of Lafayette Hill, went on to take up the instrument - and journalism. He's musical director for singer Joy Adams, drummer/producer/writer for the DBK jazz record label and author of "World of Gene Krupa: That Legendary Drummin' Man" (Pathfinder)
NEWS
June 4, 2007 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
With members of alto saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa's band pounding out their names in Morse code, the intelligence and musical adventurousness of this group of New Yorkers was evident. The Friday night Ars Nova workshop show at International House was supposed to feature Mahanthappa and pianist Vijay Iyer, as well as old free-jazz warriors Billy Bang, Barry Altschul and Joe Fonda. Due to delays, Mahanthappa opened the show, and he had a chameleonic presence. Depending on the music's emotional contexts, he could either sound open and reedy or tough and steely.
NEWS
December 3, 1987 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Kathleen Battle, one of the more gifted sopranos of our time, is heard with the Cleveland Orchestra at 8:05 tonight on WFLN (FM/95.7). You may have seen the operatic/concert singer last New Year's Day with Walter Cronkite on a CBS television special from Vienna. She also has sung with the Metropolitan Opera and, locally, with the Philadelphia Orchestra. Ohio-born and a onetime music teacher at a Cincinnati ghetto school, Battle did her first singing in church. Her selections tonight reflect that experience.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1987 | By Francis Davis, Special to The Inquirer
Why do drummers make such great band leaders? (Think of Chick Webb, Gene Krupa, Kenny Clarke, Philly Joe Jones, Art Blakey, Max Roach, Mel Lewis, Ronald Shannon Jackson and Jack De Johnette, for openers.) Maybe it's because no matter who a group's nominal leader is, it's the drummer who sets the tempo, marks the divisions between choruses and shades the dynamics so that every instrument is clearly audible at all times. That's the answer Andrew Cyrille gave me when I put the question to him in an interview last year - and Cyrille is living proof of his own theory.
NEWS
November 15, 1993 | By Wendy Beech, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Erskine Hawkins, 79, a trumpet player who was one of the greats of the swing era, died Thursday at his home in Willingboro. Hawkins' biggest hit was "Tuxedo Junction. " His group, Erskine Hawkins and His Orchestra, sold a million copies of "Tuxedo Junction" in the 1940s. Glenn Miller later recorded the tune and sold an additional 2 million records. Hawkins' 13-piece orchestra had numerous other hits, including "After Hours" and "Tippin' In. " "He made many contributions to jazz and swing music," said his nephew, John Hawkins, of Severn, Md. "Music will miss him, because he has been a force for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
To watch Robbie Cavolina and Ian McCrudden's Anita O'Day: The Life of a Jazz Singer is to get a close-up look at the strange alchemy that is jazz singing - singing at its most sublime. As more than a few of the veteran jazzbos in this fine and lively documentary attest, O'Day was a musician whose instrument was her voice. The movie makes the case that O'Day belongs on the same uppermost tier where Billie Holiday, Etta James and Sarah Vaughan reside. And despite a life of broken marriages, drinking, smoking (tobacco and otherwise)
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Dennis Sandole, a jazz guitarist, composer and educator whose students included John Coltrane and Pat Martino, died Saturday at his home in Roxborough of congestive heart failure. He had turned 87 the day before. Although virtually unknown outside the community of musicians, Mr. Sandole (san-DOE-lee) left his fingerprints all over the jazz-history book. He played in the big bands of Tommy Dorsey, Gene Krupa and Boyd Raeburn. He recorded with trumpeter Art Farmer, saxophonist Charlie Barnet, and others, and put out only a few records of original material, among them a 1956 collaboration with his brother, Adolph, titled Modern Music From Philadelphia.
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NEWS
June 17, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
BY HIS OWN admission, Russ Connor was something of a wild man in his youth. There was the time he and some buddies commandeered a trolley to drive them from dry Ocean City, N.J., to wet Somers Point for a night of intemperance. He once raced his Pontiac GTO full-out on an unopened section of the Atlantic City Expressway, not the safest venture even on a vacant road. His expenses and his caprices were paid for at least in part by the $20 weekly check he got from the government as a returning GI. He was an Army veteran of World War II. Donald Russell Connor, who went from his carefree years to the sober world of banking, working his way up to vice president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, a jazz buff who wrote four books on Benny Goodman and became pals with drummer Gene Krupa, died Wednesday at age 92. He was one of the original homeowners in Levittown.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
To watch Robbie Cavolina and Ian McCrudden's Anita O'Day: The Life of a Jazz Singer is to get a close-up look at the strange alchemy that is jazz singing - singing at its most sublime. As more than a few of the veteran jazzbos in this fine and lively documentary attest, O'Day was a musician whose instrument was her voice. The movie makes the case that O'Day belongs on the same uppermost tier where Billie Holiday, Etta James and Sarah Vaughan reside. And despite a life of broken marriages, drinking, smoking (tobacco and otherwise)
NEWS
October 29, 2008 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sam D'Amico, 76, owner of the venerable Sam D'Amico Music Center in South Philadelphia, a magnet for drummers for decades, died of West Nile virus last Wednesday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. He lived in the Packer Park section of South Philadelphia. Memories of greats from jazz, big-band and rock eras - including Gene Krupa, Buddy Rich and Desi Arnaz - were kept alive in Mr. D'Amico's cramped office at 1530 W. Moyamensing Ave. on walls plastered with photos and memorabilia.
NEWS
June 4, 2007 | By Kevin L. Carter FOR THE INQUIRER
With members of alto saxophonist Rudresh Mahanthappa's band pounding out their names in Morse code, the intelligence and musical adventurousness of this group of New Yorkers was evident. The Friday night Ars Nova workshop show at International House was supposed to feature Mahanthappa and pianist Vijay Iyer, as well as old free-jazz warriors Billy Bang, Barry Altschul and Joe Fonda. Due to delays, Mahanthappa opened the show, and he had a chameleonic presence. Depending on the music's emotional contexts, he could either sound open and reedy or tough and steely.
NEWS
December 7, 2006 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dave Black, 78, a fiery jazz drummer who toured and recorded with Duke Ellington's orchestra in the mid-1950s and whose dazzling solo on "Gonna Tan Your Hide" - written for him by composer Billy Strayhorn - is considered a classic, died of pancreatic cancer Monday at home in Alameda, Calif. Born in the K&A section of Kensington, Mr. Black started banging on toy drums sent to him by his Scottish aunt when he was 3. He also beat on pots, pans, and anything else within reach of his drumsticks.
NEWS
September 15, 2002 | By Bob Perkins
Lionel Hampton died Aug. 31 at 93, in death as in life a legend. He committed more than 70 years of his existence to the art form known as jazz. If ever there was a man born to perform in a specific arena during his time, it was the man just about everyone knew as Hamp. Hampton was a mostly self-taught musician who started out playing the drums, picked up on the piano, marimba, and xylophone, and later mastered the vibraphone . . . which is essentially an amplified xylophone. There were never many vibraphone players in jazz, but Hamp was the yardstick by which vibe players were measured.
NEWS
January 24, 2001 | By Acel Moore
Ken Burns' 10-part series Jazz, which concluded Monday night, is not only an extraordinary documentary of the history of that musical genre but also a chronicle of the painful struggle for racial equality in the 20th century through the sounds, eyes and voices of those who created what has become a great American art form. As he did in his award-winning documentaries on the Civil War and baseball, Burns poignantly uses black-and-white stills, old films and interviews to tell the story of jazz.
NEWS
October 4, 2000 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Dennis Sandole, a jazz guitarist, composer and educator whose students included John Coltrane and Pat Martino, died Saturday at his home in Roxborough of congestive heart failure. He had turned 87 the day before. Although virtually unknown outside the community of musicians, Mr. Sandole (san-DOE-lee) left his fingerprints all over the jazz-history book. He played in the big bands of Tommy Dorsey, Gene Krupa and Boyd Raeburn. He recorded with trumpeter Art Farmer, saxophonist Charlie Barnet, and others, and put out only a few records of original material, among them a 1956 collaboration with his brother, Adolph, titled Modern Music From Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 11, 1998 | by Al Hunter Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Bruce H. Klauber fell in love with the drums while watching Gene Krupa on Ed Hurst's "Summertime at the Pier" television show back in 1959. "I couldn't believe it," Klauber recalled. "It looked like the guy was going wild and getting paid for it. " Klauber, 46, of Lafayette Hill, went on to take up the instrument - and journalism. He's musical director for singer Joy Adams, drummer/producer/writer for the DBK jazz record label and author of "World of Gene Krupa: That Legendary Drummin' Man" (Pathfinder)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1997 | By Jack Lloyd, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sure, Artie Schroeck is a serious musician. Anyone who has known Schroeck over the years will testify to that. But then a lot of these same people would be surprised to learn that he is spending a lot of time collecting junk these days. The fact of the matter, though, is that Schroeck's scavenging is an important element in his latest quest to create serious music. Well, maybe not all that serious. Schroeck, you see, has set out to re-create the sounds of Spike Jones and His City Slickers - and the junk he's collecting is to make Spike Jones-like noises.
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