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Gene Mauch

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SPORTS
August 14, 2005 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gene Mauch may have been born in Kansas and lived in Southern California during his golden years, but he was the ultimate Philadelphian. Philadelphia sports fans are known for their passion and unyielding zest to drive a team to a championship. Mauch was the patron saint of both qualities. A lot of managers and coaches have expertly directed Philly's four major sports teams over the years. I challenge you to find one who had more passion than Mauch. Dick Vermeil?
NEWS
August 15, 2005 | By JOHN ROSSI
THEY CALLED him "The Little General" or "Skip" and he managed the Phillies for eight seasons, longer than anyone else in the team's modern history. But for any fan over 50 he is remembered for one thing: the collapse of the 1964 team. With a six-game lead and only 12 games remaining, the Phillies lost 10 in a row and saw the pennant go to the St. Louis Cardinals on the last day of the season. Gene Mauch never got over that loss and the tough Phillies fans never forgave him. He deserves better than that.
SPORTS
September 23, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
After he was done managing, after baseball was through torturing him, Gene Mauch lived in a California desert community. Separated from the game that was his life, he golfed daily, played cards, devoured box scores, and watched baseball on TV. By filling his days so pleasantly, he could sometimes forget how unpleasantly they began and ended. His first waking thought, the longtime Phillies manager once said, was always about the epic collapse of his 1986 California Angels. Then, before he could sleep at night, the equally harsh fate of his 1964 Phillies confronted him. "If it's true that you learn from adversity," he once told a sportswriter, "I must be the toughest SOB in the world.
SPORTS
June 15, 2011 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Columnist
Gather round, all you young Phillies fans, and I'll tell you a spooky story about your favorite franchise. Once upon a time, 50 years ago this summer to be exact, back when only the players wore uniforms, the Phillies were a very scary team. For years, they'd dwelled like trolls in the National League's basement, rarely venturing out. They were so frightening that all but their bravest fans abandoned them. A year earlier, in 1960, their manager left, too - quitting just one game into that season.
SPORTS
August 9, 2005 | By Frank Fitzpatrick and Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Gene Mauch, the steely-eyed little manager who guided three teams, including the infamous 1964 Phillies, to the brink of a World Series only to see them stranded there by the cruelest of baseball fates, died yesterday at 79. Mr. Mauch succumbed at Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage, Calif., after a lengthy battle with cancer, according to the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. Nicknamed "The Little General," both for his gifts as a game strategist and his dictatorial style, Mr. Mauch was the winningest and losingest manager in Phillies history, compiling a record of 645-684 from 1960 to 1968.
SPORTS
September 28, 2011
Charlie Manuel (2005-11) 645 Gene Mauch (1960-68) 645 Harry Wright (1884-93) 636 Danny Ozark (1973-79) 594 Jim Fregosi (1991-96) 431 SOURCE: Phillies
SPORTS
March 9, 2010
Here are the results of the poll on Philly.com asking who is the best manager in Phillies history: 1. Charlie Manuel. . . 78.7 percent 2. Gene Mauch. . . 8.7 percent 3. Dallas Green. . . 8.5 percent 4. Danny Ozark. . . 2.3 percent 5. Eddie Sawyer. . . 1.3 percent 6. Jim Fregosi. . . 0.6 percent
SPORTS
October 16, 1986 | By STAN HOCHMAN, Daily News Sports Columnist
In 1982, when Milwaukee rallied to win three in a row and bury the Angels in the American League Championship Series, Gene Mauch walked away. He walked away because his wife, Nina Lee, was very sick; because he was weary of the second-guessers; because California management was part of the badgering chorus. And now, now that the Angels have been knocked out of the playoffs after owning a 3-1 lead, will he walk away? "Why, do you think that's a good idea?" Mauch said, coming close to his only grin in the grim postgame scene.
SPORTS
September 26, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beneath the pertinent facts on Chris Short's baseball-shaped headstone at Union Cemetery in Georgetown, Del., beneath the image of him unleashing a pitch, is his nickname, "Styles. " Perhaps the moniker earned such posthumous prominence because, both ironically and literally, it was so fitting. On the mound, the Phillies lefthander was as stylish as any National League pitcher. Away from it, he was anything but. Short's Phillies teammates called him "Styles" because he sometimes carried the mismatched clothes he wore in a paper bag and didn't change them for weeks.
SPORTS
October 16, 1986 | By Jayson Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was time once again to think of the '64 Phillies. It was time once again to think of '82 in Milwaukee. It was time once again for Gene Mauch to relive all the horrors one more time. They are about to hold another World Series without him. The Boston Red Sox became the latest skeleton in Mauch's walk-in closet last night. They finished his year and finished his latest set of dreams by clobbering his California Angels, 8-1, in Game 7 of yet one more series that Gene Mauch will never be allowed to forget.
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SPORTS
June 6, 2016 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, STAFF WRITER
Attention! This is to inform you that the entertainment portion of the 2016 Phillies season has concluded. Before departing the bandwagon, please make sure to gather your unwarranted optimism. Drive safely, have a nice summer, and we'll see you again when the 76ers screw up the NBA draft. Sorry. If I don't vent, there's a good chance I'll turn into my grandfather. I've noticed signs of a transformation these last few weeks as I've tried to watch the virtually unwatchable Phillies - a nightly endeavor highlighted by an endless procession of stubborn, stupid, and fruitless at-bats.
SPORTS
October 3, 2014 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Phillies' sensational 1964 season turned tragic during a 10-game September losing streak, it was a more innocent era. No Internet. Little TV coverage. No Twitter rants. "Back then, the only social media was when you bought drinks for the writers after the game," cracked Larry Shenk, who was 25 years old and in his first year as the Phillies' public-relations director in 1964. "It was a different time, as far as the media covering the team. " The Phillies' infamous fold, which started 50 years ago on Sept.
SPORTS
September 26, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Beneath the pertinent facts on Chris Short's baseball-shaped headstone at Union Cemetery in Georgetown, Del., beneath the image of him unleashing a pitch, is his nickname, "Styles. " Perhaps the moniker earned such posthumous prominence because, both ironically and literally, it was so fitting. On the mound, the Phillies lefthander was as stylish as any National League pitcher. Away from it, he was anything but. Short's Phillies teammates called him "Styles" because he sometimes carried the mismatched clothes he wore in a paper bag and didn't change them for weeks.
SPORTS
September 23, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
After he was done managing, after baseball was through torturing him, Gene Mauch lived in a California desert community. Separated from the game that was his life, he golfed daily, played cards, devoured box scores, and watched baseball on TV. By filling his days so pleasantly, he could sometimes forget how unpleasantly they began and ended. His first waking thought, the longtime Phillies manager once said, was always about the epic collapse of his 1986 California Angels. Then, before he could sleep at night, the equally harsh fate of his 1964 Phillies confronted him. "If it's true that you learn from adversity," he once told a sportswriter, "I must be the toughest SOB in the world.
SPORTS
June 26, 2013 | By Stan Hochman, Daily News Columnist
THEY WERE OLD. So many guys in their 40s. Old baseball guys creak when they run and they run a step slower. They make a whistling, tea-kettle sound when they go first to third or second to home. Wheeze Kids, that's what I nicknamed that 1983 Phillies team, and it stuck. A spinoff of Whiz Kids, the nickname for that swaggering, young Phillies bunch that won the pennant in 1950, only to get swept by the Yankees in the World Series. Throw enough mud at the wall and some of it sticks.
NEWS
May 9, 2013 | By John Rossi
On Thursday, Charlie Manuel will pass Gene Mauch as the longest-serving manager in Phillies history, which is quite an accomplishment given the historically poor record the Phillies compiled until recent days. Manuel is not only the dean of Philadelphia team managers, but he is also unusual in that he has remained popular with a fan base known for its toughness and fickleness. The two managers were vastly different characters. Mauch was the baseball sharpie, honed in the Leo Durocher image of knock down your mother if it means winning a game.
NEWS
October 12, 2011
CHARLIE MANUEL said that he "rolled the marbles" when he sent Ben Francisco to pinch-hit for Cole Hamels in Game 3 of the NLCS, and added a folksy reminder that he was once the state marbles champion of Virginia. Gene Mauch might have said that he "rolled the dice" with Francisco and cited Francisco's numbers against a fast ball early in the count with two runners on. Night and day. Two very different managers of two very different teams from two very different eras. And now, in the gloomy aftermath of the early exit from playoff baseball, people are trying to compare the nightmare that was 1964 with the abrupt ending to the 2011 season.
SPORTS
September 29, 2011 | BY PAUL HAGEN, hagenp@phillynews.com
ATLANTA - Charlie Manuel is a good, old boy from Virginia who tends to speak in stream-of-consciousness monologues. Gene Mauch, as dry as the Kansas plains of his birthplace, often allowed long seconds to elapse before answering a question, then keeping his reply short and concise. They met a few times along the way without making a real connection. Baseball has a way of putting disparate lives in the same orbit, though, and that's the case now with Manuel and Mauch. Going into last night's regular-season finale at Turner Field, each had won 645 games while managing the Phillies, tied for first on the franchise's all-time list.
SPORTS
September 28, 2011
Charlie Manuel (2005-11) 645 Gene Mauch (1960-68) 645 Harry Wright (1884-93) 636 Danny Ozark (1973-79) 594 Jim Fregosi (1991-96) 431 SOURCE: Phillies
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