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Gene Shue

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July 25, 1990 | By Mike Bruton, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gene Shue, the coach who 17 years ago raised the 76ers from the ashes of the worst season any NBA team has endured, returned to the organization yesterday as general manager. The appointment brought the Sixers a man who has traveled across much of the NBA map and experienced plenty of professional basketball's highs and lows. Shue, 58, ranks fourth on the career victory list among NBA coaches with 784 triumphs. He has also lost more games than any other NBA coach, 861. "I have unbelievable roots here in Philadelphia," said Shue, whose trek as an NBA survivor includes two stints with both the Washington Bullets and the Los Angeles and San Diego Clippers during a 22-year career as a coach.
SPORTS
July 10, 1991 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Gene Shue acknowledges he initially approached the idea of signing Charles Shackleford with a negative attitude. That's an amazing statement for Shue, who never sees a glass as half-empty, always sees it half-full. But Shue, the 76ers' general manager, feels his attitude changing as the Sixers inch closer toward tendering a contract offer to Shackleford, a 6-10, 25-year-old prospect who spent last season with a team in Italy. There's a strong possibility that they could take that step this week, as Shackleford is mulling a couple of European offers.
SPORTS
February 5, 1988 | Daily News Wire Services
Los Angeles Clippers coach Gene Shue was philosophical after becoming the first head coach in NBA history to suffer 800 defeats. "I'm never ever going to have a great record," Shue said after reaching the milestone with a 117-86 loss to the visiting Los Angeles Lakers last night. "Every job I've had has been a rebuilding job. It would be nice to be able to take over a team that has higher expectations. "I'm a very competitive person, and the losses are very unfortunate to me. Thank God there's victories in the NBA. That's what I live for. " Shue has gotten 767 of them in his 21 seasons and is fourth on the all-time victory list.
SPORTS
October 26, 1991 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Don't read anything into this, but 76ers general manager Gene Shue spent part of yesterday doing his homework on Ralph Sampson. Shue called Jerry Reynolds, Sacramento's director of player personnel, to check into the scenario in which the Kings Thursday bought out the final two seasons of Sampson's contract. Shue did not say the Sixers, who already have 14 players under contract, have any direct interest in Sampson. "All I'm saying is, I'm doing some follow-up work on the situation," Shue said while the Sixers were preparing for tonight's final preseason game against New Jersey in Syracuse, N.Y. "I don't have a complete answer, but if Ralph could play, why wouldn't Sacramento keep him?"
SPORTS
January 20, 1992 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
Yes, the Washington Bullets were among the teams that inquired in recent weeks about the availability of the 76ers' Charles Barkley. "I just said that, if they were interested (in making a trade), I'd appreciate them getting back to me," said Bullets general manager John Nash, the former Sixers general manager. "Gene Shue (the Sixers' general managerEL-1) said he didn't believe that they'd trade him. But I would expect that most teams in the NBA did their homework, in much the same situation last spring when it was thought that Patrick Ewing might be available from New York.
SPORTS
March 20, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
The Washington Bullets were looking toward the future when they replaced coach Gene Shue with former Baltimore Bullets star Kevin Loughery yesterday. Bullets general manager Bob Ferry said "the decision was not made for just this season" in an interview after it was announced that Loughery would be signing a multiyear contract. Loughery, 46, who was fired last year as coach of the Chicago Bulls after two seasons, is expected to meet with the Bullets players at a noon practice today.
SPORTS
February 21, 1987 | By PHIL JASNER, Daily News Sports Writer
Gene Shue wouldn't mind coaching the Sacramento Kings in 1987-88. He has already told the Kings that, but isn't sure anyone has been listening. Shue, who has coached the Washington Bullets, 76ers and San Diego Clippers, and is now the Sixers' television analyst, has already placed a phone call and written a letter to Kings' president Joe Axelson, inquiring about the situation. The Kings fired coach Phil Johnson and assistant Frank Hamblen just after the All-Star break and left the team in the hands of assistant Jerry Reynolds, saying they are conducting a search for the best available man. Shue, in the meantime, has hired high profile agent Ron Grinker to help him get back into the coaching business.
SPORTS
July 22, 1986 | By BILL FLEISCHMAN, Daily News Sports Writer
In April, a month after he was fired as coach of the Washington Bullets, Gene Shue said he still wanted to be an NBA coach. Funny how a few months without coaching offers can change a man's thinking. "Coaching is something I really love, but there just aren't any jobs available," Shue said last night from his Maryland home after PRISM announced that he will be the cable network's new Sixers analyst. Shue, the former coach of the Sixers, Baltimore Bullets, San Diego Clippers and Washington Bullets, will team with Jim Barniak on the Sixers games.
SPORTS
February 18, 1992 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
The NBA's legendary Rumor Central keeps throwing off sparks about possible moves before Thursday's trading deadline. But real sparks? Or puff and fluff? "I don't see anything happening," Sixers general manager Gene Shue said yesterday. "To my knowledge, there's not one thing going on. " That's what Shue has said all along, while rumors have circulated wildly about a potential major deal for the Sixers with the Los Angeles Clippers and a lesser one with the Dallas Mavericks.
SPORTS
April 14, 1992 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
The published quote was attributed to an unnamed official of the 76ers. The quote, in Sunday's Inquirer, rips Sixers forward Charles Barkley. It said Barkley "plays for himself," that "if you don't play defense, you don't play hard," and that "he doesn't play to win. " Barkley was led to believe that the quote was from general manager Gene Shue. Whether or not Shue was the source, Barkley plainly does not like Shue. That became even more obvious yesterday, when Barkley - unable to practice and doubtful for tonight's game against the Boston Celtics because of a dislocated middle finger on his left hand - said exactly what he thought about the man who has been the team's GM for two seasons.
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SPORTS
November 15, 2012 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
IT'S HARD to imagine anyone having a much tougher time during his first few months as an NBA player than 76ers rookie Arnett Moultrie. During his final workout before the June draft, this one for the Sacramento Kings, Moultrie rolled his ankle so severely that the boot didn't come off much before the Sixers opened training camp in early October. His first days with the team were head-spinning in that he was trying to pick up the various offenses and multiple defensive schemes. And he had to do it while trying to prove to his coaches and himself that his ankle was strong enough to support his 6-10, 245-pound frame.
SPORTS
November 2, 2012 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer
GEORGE McGINNIS was a franchise player when he arrived in Philadelphia in 1975, following four tremendous seasons in the ABA where he was considered the equal of Julius Erving. But by 1978, after the Sixers had lost in the NBA Finals to the Portland Trail Blazers in 1977 and were eliminated by the Washington Bullets in the second round of the 1978 playoffs, it became obvious that McGinnis and Erving, the new franchise player, could not co-exist. Add in the fact that Billy Cunningham, a more demanding coach, had succeeded Gene Shue and that more effort was expected of the underachieving Sixers, and the writing was on the wall: George McGinnis had to go. Cunningham learned throughout the season that McGinnis, a strong influence in the locker room, was a lousy practice player and his attitude spread to the younger players on the team: Lloyd Free, Darryl Dawkins and Joe Bryant.
SPORTS
December 16, 2010 | By BOB COONEY, cooneyb@phillynews.com
The anticipation of Blake Griffin's arrival to the Los Angeles Clippers after he was chosen as the first pick in the 2009 draft almost put the team on the same conversation level as the other NBA team that shares the same arena. Almost, of course, is the key word. It will be many, many years, if ever, when the Clippers overtake the Lakers as the focal point of conversations in LA, but Griffin's arrival was immense. Then came the season-ending injury in the preseason to his left knee.
SPORTS
October 24, 1995 | By Raad Cawthon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gene Shue, the 76ers' director of player personnel, did not hesitate when asked whom Jerry Stackhouse reminds him of. "He reminds me of Jordan," Shue said. Being compared to His Airness Michael Jordan on the basketball court is like being compared to the Aga Khan on the personal-wealth meter. And Shue's assessment came after a mere three weeks of practice and five preseason games for the first-round draft pick out of North Carolina. But Stackhouse, for his part, says he has heard the same thing for years.
SPORTS
May 23, 1994 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
Those old standbys, a rabbit's foot and a four-leaf clover, were about the only lucky charms Gene Shue did not have stashed in his gray suit for the 10th annual NBA draft lottery. The 76ers' director of player personnel might not be superstitious, but the team's office staff apparently is. Mary Purcell, an administrative assistant, had given Shue a tiny ornamental fish, obviously in the hope that it would be the fish that saved Philadelphia. Account executive Nina McElroy contributed her treasured lucky penny, public relations assistant Jody Silverman a Tweety Bird.
SPORTS
May 23, 1994 | By Mike Bruton, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gene Shue arrived at the NBA draft lottery yesterday armed with good-luck charms, but they weren't good enough to foil the league's new, complex selection procedure. Shue, the 76ers' director of player personnel, brought a lucky penny, a signature from the outrageously fortunate Pat Williams - whose Orlando Magic had the top pick in the last two drafts - and the Ping-Pong ball from the 1993 lottery that yielded the No. 2 pick and Shawn Bradley, but the Sixers still got the sixth selection.
SPORTS
July 22, 1993 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Los Angeles Clippers, spurned by Lenny Wilkens and Hubie Brown, hired Bob Weiss as their head coach yesterday. Weiss, fired by the Atlanta Hawks after last season, takes the post vacated when Larry Brown resigned in June to become coach of the Indiana Pacers. Weiss, 51, was interviewed early in the selection process. The Clippers went back to him this week after Hubie Brown decided to remain a television basketball commentator. Wilkens apparently was on the verge of taking the Clippers job but changed his mind and instead took Weiss' former job with the Hawks.
SPORTS
March 9, 1993 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At least the 76ers didn't trade Doug Moe to Phoenix for three coaches. We know how that would have worked out. The good news is that the Sixers will play better for the rest of this miserable season. They won't be better, perhaps, but they'll play better. Their use of a more conventional style will prevent the type of 56-point blowout that marked Moe's final game. But the best news as the Sixers' organization continues its search for identity and direction is that Fred Carter finally will get his chance to be a head coach in the NBA. For more than a decade, Carter had coached in relative anonymity as an assistant.
SPORTS
December 12, 1992 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
The Benjamin Franklin Bridge was closed last night. All lanes to the Los Angeles Clippers' basket at the Spectrum, however, were open. The highways into Atlantic City were closed last night. All pathways to Clippers' layups were free and clear. In the NBA, where the game is essentially played above the rim, the Sixers - after a brief respite in Wednesday night's victory over Seattle - reverted to being lower than even the least optimistic expectations. Read it and weep.
SPORTS
May 28, 1992 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Gene Shue, the biggest loser in the Sixers' administrative-level reshuffling, did not attend yesterday's press conference. Nor was he taking phone calls to discuss his demotion from general manager to director of player personnel. But both owner Harold Katz and new GM Jim Lynam said they're confident Shue will adjust quickly to the new arrangement. "I think he's handled it well," Katz said. "I think he'll enjoy the lesser role. He'll be on the road more. He's still a California guy (Shue's wife operates a business in Los Angeles)
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