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NEWS
October 1, 1987 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Special to The Inquirer
The last day to register to vote for the Nov. 3 general election is Monday. To register, residents must be 18 years old on or before Nov. 4 - the day after the election- and a U.S. citizen for at least 30 days before the election. They must have lived in the election district for at least 30 days before the election. Registered voters who have not voted in two years or who have moved to another county must reregister to be eligible to vote. Residents can register by appearing at their county courthouse or by mailing in a completed registration form.
NEWS
April 13, 2012 | By Holly Ramer and Brian Bakst, Associated Press
EXETER, N.H. - Eyeing the November election, Vice President Biden on Thursday called presumptive GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney "out of touch" and "out of step" with history and basic American values. Biden also opened a new line of attack, introducing the "Romney rule" and contrasting it with President Obama's push for the "Buffet rule" to force rich people to pay more of their income in taxes. The measure, named after billionaire investor Warren Buffett, says the wealthy should not pay taxes at a lower rate than middle-class wage-earners.
NEWS
November 3, 1993 | By Dwight Ott and Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Popular educator Arnold M. Webster last night easily defeated his two challengers for mayor of this once-bustling, now struggling city. With nearly all votes tallied, the school superintendent was leading Republican candidate Keith A. Walker by a ratio of more than 4-to-1. The vote for the third candidate in the race, write-in independent Troy Oglesby, will not be tallied until today. After he won more votes in the primary than all of his Democratic rivals combined, including outgoing mayor Aaron Thompson, the race never was expected to be close.
NEWS
May 9, 1995 | By L. Stuart Ditzen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Democrat incumbents in the register of wills' and sheriff's offices are facing challenges in next Tuesday's primary, and a vacant city commissioner's seat has three Republicans scrambling to fill it. Otherwise, action in Philadelphia's inconspicuous row offices is dormant - at least until November. In one contested race, longtime Register of Wills Ronald R. Donatucci, running for a fifth term, is facing a challenge from a former employee, whom he fired, for the Democratic nomination.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Michael Smerconish
Fed up with a lack of competition in "safe" legislative districts, California voters ditched the state's conventional primary system two years ago and implemented the "Top Two Open Primary. " The initiative was called Proposition 14, a concept I embraced on this page. Here's how it works: Candidates choose whether to associate themselves with a particular party or run unaffiliated. All candidates are then listed on the same ballot, and every voter, regardless of party affiliation (or lack thereof)
NEWS
May 13, 1987 | By H. G. Bissinger, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wilson Goode vs. Frank Rizzo in the general election in November? No complaint from the mayor. And no complaint from the former mayor. Part of that has to do with their competitive desire for a rematch. And part of that, say political strategists and advisers for both camps, has to do with an unusual phenomenon that has emerged in the mayoral primary. Politically, Goode is much more fearful of a challenge from Republican underdog John J. Egan Jr. As for Rizzo, some close supporters say he wants to stay away from Democratic underdog Edward G. Rendell if he can help it. Because of that ironic twist, political strategists acknowledge that Egan and Rendell would potentially be in very strong shape in a general election - assuming, of course, that they can win their respective primaries on Tuesday.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | By Ray Rinaldi, Special to The Inquirer
Write-in votes cast in four Burlington County communities during Tuesday's primary could qualify some unexpected candidates for positions on general election ballots and bring competition to other candidates who thought they would be running unopposed in November. Candidates who miss the primary filing deadlines must receive a minimum number of write-in votes to be eligible to represent their parties in the general election. The minimum varies in each municipality depending on the number of registered voters.
NEWS
November 3, 2011
Voters in 97 different divisions will be sent to new polling places for next Tuesday's general election. Gary Ferris, who arranges polling locations for the city commissioners' office, said about two-thirds of the new polling places were spurred by issues involving access for the disabled. In other cases, polling places had to be moved because the owners no longer wanted to rent them to the city, or because buildings were closed or undergoing repairs. A list of the polling places that are changing is available on the city commissioners' website: http://phillyelection.com/2011Changes.pdf . - Bob Warner
NEWS
May 27, 2011
TO SAVE the city money, some suggestions: _ Eliminate school-crossing guards, because no one crosses at their corners or listens to them. _ Don't repave the streets; leave the potholes so motorists will have to drive within the speed limit. _ Don't hold criminal trials until the defendants have been arrested at least 14 times - because nothing happens to them until then. _ Don't put return-payment envelopes in real-estate- tax billings. _ Only Democratic primaries are needed to determine elected officials - skip the general election.
NEWS
September 18, 2013
Gov. Christie is still sticking to his flimsy excuses for making New Jersey voters go to the polls twice in less than three weeks. Christie first refused to hold a special election to replace the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg on the same date as the general election, Nov. 5, saying voters deserved to choose Lautenberg's successor as soon as possible. Then, last week, he vetoed a bill that would have moved up the general election to the Oct. 16 special-election date. This time, the governor suggested New Jerseyans aren't adroit enough to handle changing the date.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 14, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
State Sen. Daylin Leach says Marjorie Margolies is continuing to violate federal campaign finance laws, and has lodged a new complaint as the Democrats vying for the 13th Congressional District seat enter the last full week before the May 20 primary. Leach said Monday he intends to file a supplementary letter with the Federal Election Commission alleging that Margolies has again spent contributions designated for the general election on her primary campaign. Four Democrats are battling for the nomination in the 13th, which includes parts of Philadelphia and Montgomery County.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Chris Brennan
FORMER U.S. Rep. Marjorie Margolies has run her bid to retake her old 13th District seat like an economic stimulus plan for a handful of political consultants. She spent more than she took in for the last three months of 2013 and the first three months of this year. But did she violate a federal law in the process? State Sen. Daylin Leach , a rival in the May 20 Democratic primary election, filed a Federal Election Commission complaint this week accusing Margolies of illegally spending campaign cash on primary expenses when that money was reserved for the general election.
NEWS
November 1, 2013 | By Chris Brennan
A MERE FRACTION of Philadelphia's 1,024,362 registered voters are expected to show up Tuesday to cast general-election ballots. They'll be electing a district attorney, city controller and judges for Superior Court (one), the Court of Common Pleas (seven) and Municipal Court (three). We'll see if city voters can beat the dismal 9.28 percent turnout for the May 21 primary election. In the top two races, District Attorney Seth Williams seeks a second term, challenged by Republican Danny Alvarez , while City Controller Alan Butkovitz seeks a third term, challenged by Republican Terry Tracy . The incumbents have the edge here, since Philly's registered Democrats outnumber Republicans by more than six-to-one.
NEWS
September 18, 2013
Gov. Christie is still sticking to his flimsy excuses for making New Jersey voters go to the polls twice in less than three weeks. Christie first refused to hold a special election to replace the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg on the same date as the general election, Nov. 5, saying voters deserved to choose Lautenberg's successor as soon as possible. Then, last week, he vetoed a bill that would have moved up the general election to the Oct. 16 special-election date. This time, the governor suggested New Jerseyans aren't adroit enough to handle changing the date.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Roger Alford, Associated Press
FRANKFORT, Ky. - To cover his political flank, Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell has forged an alliance with tea party darling Rand Paul, picked up support from other national tea party leaders, and brought in a campaign manager from the upper echelons of the tea party movement. The GOP's fiscally conservative wing has proved particularly powerful in Kentucky, and elsewhere, it has felled incumbents including McConnell's longtime Republican colleague U.S. Sen. Dick Lugar of Indiana.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Michael Smerconish
Fed up with a lack of competition in "safe" legislative districts, California voters ditched the state's conventional primary system two years ago and implemented the "Top Two Open Primary. " The initiative was called Proposition 14, a concept I embraced on this page. Here's how it works: Candidates choose whether to associate themselves with a particular party or run unaffiliated. All candidates are then listed on the same ballot, and every voter, regardless of party affiliation (or lack thereof)
NEWS
June 19, 2013 | .ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRENTON - U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone called Monday for multiple debates leading up to the August Democratic U.S. Senate primary in New Jersey, one of the first attempts by one candidate in the four-person race to engage the others. The other three campaigns all supported the idea of debates and forums without giving Pallone credit for putting it out there first. All of them said they would look at debate and forum proposals as they roll in. In making his call, Pallone, of Monmouth County, said voters should be able to make a decision that is not "based solely on slick TV ads and 20-second sound bites.
NEWS
June 12, 2013 | By Katie Zezima and Angela Delli Santi, Associated Press
UNION CITY, N.J. - Two elected officials from North Jersey are the latest Democrats to back Republican Gov. Christie in his bid for reelection this fall. State Sen. Brian Stack endorsed Christie in Union City, where Stack is also mayor. "He's been a governor that's been truly responsive. I mean that sincerely," Stack, a Democrat, said after Monday's announcement. "No other governor would call me at 4 in the morning and say, 'Brian, I'm watching Channel 12 ... and I see a big fire.
NEWS
June 7, 2013
Gov. Christie's argument that New Jersey voters shouldn't have to wait a year to choose their next senator is absolutely correct. But his contention that they can't wait a few more weeks is mainly a test of the governor's remarkable ability to keep a straight face. On Tuesday, the day after the death of U.S. Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg, Christie announced that a special election to fill his seat would be held as soon as the law allowed. That sounded about right - except that the earliest possible date turned out to be Oct. 16, or three weeks before the general election in which the governor himself is running.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Patrick Kerkstra
One of the most bitter and longest-running civil wars in Philadelphia politics came to an end this month, and almost nobody noticed. That's the price of irrelevance, which is perhaps the most charitable adjective one can use to describe the state of Philadelphia's Republican City Committee, a barely functioning party apparatus that often struggles to field credible candidates for offices big and small. For four years, the city's GOP has been riven into two blocs: an old guard, largely content to hold on to its share of the city's dwindling patronage jobs, and a cast of relative newcomers disgusted by the party's stagnation and insignificance.
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