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BUSINESS
January 14, 2000 | By Andrea Knox, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
DuPont Co. in recent years has expanded beyond its chemical roots and bought food and seed companies in its quest to play a bigger role in feeding America. Yesterday, the Wilmington giant said its Protein Technologies International unit in St. Louis has formed a joint venture with General Mills Inc. to develop and market foods with high soy content. The joint venture hopes to capitalize on the upsurge in demand for soy-rich foods since they were recognized in October by the Food and Drug Administration to help reduce the risk of heart disease.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
VINELAND, N.J. - In this very poor, rural pocket of South Jersey, the locals are grateful for what they have, especially jobs. But the lives of 370 families were tossed off-balance when the parent company of the Italian-foods brand Progresso - whose manufacturing plant has been a fixture at 500 W. Elmer Rd. since 1970 - announced its "tentative decision" to close the plant by early 2018. General Mills, the Minneapolis-based food giant that has operated the plant since 2001, delivered the news - which one union leader called a "kick to the stomach" - July 21. It came just two months after United Food & Commercial Workers Local 152 ratified a four-year contract that all but ensured job security at the Vineland plant during its term.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
VINELAND, N.J. - The timer is ticking for the Progresso soup plant. Members of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 152 met Friday with the labor relations team of General Mills over the $20.4 million in cuts that the company is seeking to keep the Vineland Progresso plant open. Last week, Brian String, president of Local 152, said his team had come up with about $4 million in cuts, and was optimistic that further cost savings could be found. But that might have been premature.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1989 | By David Johnston and Mike Schurman, Special to The Inquirer
Nearly four out of every five bags of Gold Medal flour checked by Atlantic County consumer-affairs investigators were short-weighted, many by up to 10 percent, authorities said yesterday. Similar spot checks last year also had showed widespread short-weighting of Gold Medal flour, they said. William Ross, Atlantic County director of consumer affairs, said that if General Mills Inc., the Minneapolis firm that owns the Gold Medal brand, did not solve the short-weighting problem, he would seek to ban sales of Gold Medal flour in New Jersey.
NEWS
February 16, 2013
William Watts Biggers, 85, co-creator of the cartoon Underdog, the mild-mannered shoeshine boy who turned into a caped superhero to rescue his girlfriend, Sweet Polly Purebred, died unexpectedly Sunday, Feb. 10, at his Plymouth, Mass., home, said a family friend. He was working for the New York City advertising firm DFS when he accepted an assignment from the agency's largest client, General Mills, to create television cartoons to promote its breakfast cereals. The most famous was Underdog, which debuted in 1964 on NBC. After General Mills pulled out of the animation business, Mr. Biggers became vice president of promotion and creative services at NBC. He was also a novelist and writer.
SPORTS
May 29, 1997 | By Kevin Tatum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Team Cheerios are selling fast in Northampton, a town of 9,000 about 70 miles northeast of Philadelphia. Eleven members of the 1996 Northampton High championship softball team are pictured on the back of the box. Northampton was one of four teams chosen nationwide for the promotion, which began last summer with Olympians at the Atlanta Games featured on breakfast cereal boxes. (General Mills makes Wheaties and Cheerios.) Beth Kim, a marketing consultant for General Mills, said a search began eight months ago for high school teams.
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
Somewhere between the Thai Chicken Subs and the Indonesian Chicken Turnovers with Spicy Peanut Sauce - as the Falafel Sandwiches with Fire-Roasted Tomato Aioli awaited - it struck me hard: Something I would taste on this afternoon, in the peaceful hum of a conference room in a hotel in Orlando, was worth a million dollars as the grand-prize winner of the 45th Pillsbury Bake-Off. The next morning, Martha Stewart went on live television to make someone very happy, but it was the 12 judges - food writers, cookbook authors, chefs - who tasted, assesses, debated, and parsed the work of 100 home cooks, all finalists, culled from tens of thousands of entries.
NEWS
September 15, 1992 | By Amy Westfeldt, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Acme Market in Cinnaminson pulled all 20-ounce boxes of Cheerios cereal off its shelves yesterday after a Burlington Township customer told the store that she had found a razor blade and a straight pin in a cereal box. No other reports of razors, pins or any other objects in cereal have been received by the Malvern-based supermarket chain, general counsel Walt Rubel said yesterday. Cheerios' manufacturer, General Mills Corp. of Minneapolis, also has received no consumer complaints, spokesman Craig Stulstad said.
NEWS
February 22, 1998 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Central Bucks West High School's football team has gone undefeated. It has won a state championship. The players have been honored on the floor of the State House. They have been to lunch with Gov. Ridge. Now, they are coming to a breakfast table near you. A new "Team Cheerios" cereal box featuring the team's picture and statistical highlights from the Bucks' championship 1997 season is hitting shelves in Central Bucks stores. "In many ways, this was the honor the most people were talking about," said Bucks coach Mike Pettine, who was himself named the Associated Press Pennsylvania Big School football coach of the year.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2008 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Campbell Soup Co.'s chief executive officer said yesterday that the Camden company took a "step back" in its most recent quarter, as tough competition and high ingredient costs caused disappointing results. Investors turned cold on the stock, sending the shares down 6.26 percent, their worst one-day percentage loss since CEO Douglas R. Conant took over in January 2001. The shares closed at $33.70, off $2.25, on the New York Stock Exchange. "Clearly we took a step back this year, but what I would tell you is that I am very optimistic," Conant said in a conference call with investors.
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BUSINESS
August 21, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
VINELAND, N.J. - The timer is ticking for the Progresso soup plant. Members of United Food and Commercial Workers Local 152 met Friday with the labor relations team of General Mills over the $20.4 million in cuts that the company is seeking to keep the Vineland Progresso plant open. Last week, Brian String, president of Local 152, said his team had come up with about $4 million in cuts, and was optimistic that further cost savings could be found. But that might have been premature.
BUSINESS
August 4, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
VINELAND, N.J. - In this very poor, rural pocket of South Jersey, the locals are grateful for what they have, especially jobs. But the lives of 370 families were tossed off-balance when the parent company of the Italian-foods brand Progresso - whose manufacturing plant has been a fixture at 500 W. Elmer Rd. since 1970 - announced its "tentative decision" to close the plant by early 2018. General Mills, the Minneapolis-based food giant that has operated the plant since 2001, delivered the news - which one union leader called a "kick to the stomach" - July 21. It came just two months after United Food & Commercial Workers Local 152 ratified a four-year contract that all but ensured job security at the Vineland plant during its term.
BUSINESS
December 21, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Campbell Soup Co. chief executive Denise Morrison has spent $2.4 billion since 2012 on companies she hopes will grow faster than Campbell's highly profitable canned soups. In particular, industry experts say, Morrison's creation of Campbell Fresh - a new division led by Bolthouse Farms' refrigerated juices and salad dressing - is the right way to go, given consumer trends. But Bolthouse's biggest business - carrots and related products - was a drag in the first quarter. And there is skepticism among analysts that Campbell can stick to one strategy for long to grow beyond its legacy soup business.
NEWS
February 16, 2013
William Watts Biggers, 85, co-creator of the cartoon Underdog, the mild-mannered shoeshine boy who turned into a caped superhero to rescue his girlfriend, Sweet Polly Purebred, died unexpectedly Sunday, Feb. 10, at his Plymouth, Mass., home, said a family friend. He was working for the New York City advertising firm DFS when he accepted an assignment from the agency's largest client, General Mills, to create television cartoons to promote its breakfast cereals. The most famous was Underdog, which debuted in 1964 on NBC. After General Mills pulled out of the animation business, Mr. Biggers became vice president of promotion and creative services at NBC. He was also a novelist and writer.
NEWS
April 4, 2012 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
Somewhere between the Thai Chicken Subs and the Indonesian Chicken Turnovers with Spicy Peanut Sauce - as the Falafel Sandwiches with Fire-Roasted Tomato Aioli awaited - it struck me hard: Something I would taste on this afternoon, in the peaceful hum of a conference room in a hotel in Orlando, was worth a million dollars as the grand-prize winner of the 45th Pillsbury Bake-Off. The next morning, Martha Stewart went on live television to make someone very happy, but it was the 12 judges - food writers, cookbook authors, chefs - who tasted, assesses, debated, and parsed the work of 100 home cooks, all finalists, culled from tens of thousands of entries.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2008 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Campbell Soup Co.'s chief executive officer said yesterday that the Camden company took a "step back" in its most recent quarter, as tough competition and high ingredient costs caused disappointing results. Investors turned cold on the stock, sending the shares down 6.26 percent, their worst one-day percentage loss since CEO Douglas R. Conant took over in January 2001. The shares closed at $33.70, off $2.25, on the New York Stock Exchange. "Clearly we took a step back this year, but what I would tell you is that I am very optimistic," Conant said in a conference call with investors.
NEWS
September 5, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
James Dahdah Hauad, 71, a Lebanese immigrant by way of Mexico who made it big in the Italian Market, died of colon cancer Thursday at home in South Philadelphia. Mr. Hauad's long career began in 1963, when the young immigrant and his wife, Josephine Lagana Hauad, bought her father's grocery store at 1014 Federal St. They renamed it J&J Imports, and for the next 30 years the store specialized in basic foodstuffs - milk, bread, eggs and the like - and exotic edibles. Among the foods they carried were couscous and a wide variety of dried and canned chiles, corn husks, and nopales cactus from Mexico.
FOOD
November 3, 2005 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
Betty Crocker - stuck in the role of the '50s mom with time to fuss over home-cooked meals - is shaking loose. And she's hoping to reach a younger, hipper audience, one with a taste for fast food, world cuisines, and quick-cooked meals. She's also making a play for our fast-growing Hispanic population. And paying more attention to singles, vegetarians, even non-cooks. Spurred by a survey showing huge differences in the tastes and cooking styles of younger women who see cooking as an option, not an obligation, a revitalized Betty Crocker is targeting people in their 20s with: Online entertaining tips (Seek YourThing.
SPORTS
March 11, 2005 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Cubs pitcher Kerry Wood returned to Chicago yesterday to have his right shoulder examined. Wood felt tightness in his pitching shoulder on Wednesday and left a spring-training game before the third inning. He had an MRI exam before heading to Chicago, Cubs manager Dusty Baker said. Wood, slated to be the opening-day starter, missed two months last season because of tendinitis in his right triceps. He was sidelined for the 1999 season after elbow-ligament replacement surgery.
SPORTS
October 29, 2004 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The Boston Red Sox will be the first World Series winner featured on a Wheaties box since the 1999 New York Yankees. The special-edition package will picture slugger David Ortiz on the front of the box, cereal maker General Mills said yesterday. The box will be available in mid-November. The Colorado Rockies and Jeromy Burnitz declined to exercise a $3 million mutual option, and the outfielder will get a $250,000 buyout. Los Angeles Dodgers slugger Adrian Beltre filed for free agency on the same day he underwent arthroscopic surgery to remove two large bone spurs from his left ankle.
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