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General Store

NEWS
December 10, 1989 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
For more years than he'd like to remember, a stop at Rancocas' Stevens General Store and the post office next to it has been a daily ritual for Gil Kimble. Like a lot of residents of the small community on the banks of the Rancocas Creek, Kimble - who has stopped at the store for more than 60 years - said he has come to think of the store as an "institution, a place where I can come to chew the fat every day. " But come Dec. 31, the store will go the way of the flour scoop, the Model T horn, the 1899 Coca-Cola calendar and a Depression-era notice advertising haircuts for 20 cents apiece on display in a museum on the second floor of the store.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | By Nancy Petersen, Special to The Inquirer
For weeks - against odds even greater than those of winning the record lottery drawing - everyone in Birchrunville kept the secret. So when Anna May Day officially arrived April 29, the guest of honor was so in the dark that even the arrival of a four-horse-team carriage in her driveway did not fuel her suspicions. By the time she had been transported in the carriage, owned by resident Clarkson Addis, to downtown Birchrunville and realized she had a Vincent Township police escort, thank you, it dawned on Anna May Houck (nee Slemmer)
NEWS
September 23, 1988 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
When I was at sea on convoy duty during WWII, I picked up a book in the ship library that made a deep and lasting impression on me. It was Behind the Ballots, the autobiography of Jim Farley, the colorful Irish Democrat from Grassy Point, N.Y., just up the Hudson from the Big Apple. James Aloysius Farley filled the book with unforgettable anecdotes - about the political rise of Franklin D. Roosevelt (and the role Jim Farley played in the rise) and his days as postmaster general during FDR's first two terms in the White House, among others.
NEWS
July 23, 1987 | By Kate Shatzkin, Special to The Inquirer
The volumes of evidence in John Nagy's upstairs study sometimes seem like pieces of a big jigsaw puzzle that refuse to fit. Someday, he hopes to arrange them to create a history of Willistown Township, where Nagy has made his home for more than 20 years. The problem is integrating the pieces - nuggets of information about the township's history - that the Sugartown resident has gathered for nearly a quarter century. For example, Nagy has two pages of a journal kept by Abigail Worrall, the wife of Sharpless Worrall, proprietor of the general store across from Nagy's home on Sugartown Road.
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