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NEWS
March 29, 1998
From the White House to a boardroom near you, baby boomers are defining our politics (Bill Clinton and Newt Gingrich), our economy (Bill Gates and Michael Jordan) and our entertainment (James Cameron and Oprah Winfrey). But why let them have all the fun? What of their foibles, those skeletons in the closet, those embarrassing moments that are edited from the annual retelling of Woodstock or Summer of Love stories? If you were born before 1945 or after 1964, this is your chance.
NEWS
October 25, 1998 | By W.C. Cooper
Sen. John Glenn is scheduled to revisit space on Thursday. Many are wondering whether, at 77, he can carry his weight on the Discovery mission. In truth, Glenn will be carrying the hopes of his generation, a generation that defined this century. Glenn, the original American orbiter, has been assigned to serve as payload specialist on the mission. Its major objective is the deployment of the SPARTAN science spacecraft to document solar activity affecting Earth's environment.
NEWS
June 20, 1986
I think it was poor policy to publish an article such as "Do the elderly have it too good?" (Inquirer Magazine, June 8). In my opinion, the central premise is petty - but it could fuel controversy that could ultimately become a serious generation war. And with all the problems that exist in America today, we certainly don't need another one. I know there's a "safety" clause - "rich retired people get breaks they simply don't deserve" - but "rich"...
NEWS
August 14, 2007 | By BRIAN TILL
TWO WEEKENDS ago, fours kids from Newark, N.J., were shot in cold blood in their neighborhood schoolyard. All were African-American, all headed to Delaware State. Three young men were killed, the woman survived. There's a resurgence in violent crime sweeping through our inner cities, and segregation is worse today than it was at the time of Brown v. Board of Education. We know it's true, but we pretend it isn't so. This country has stopped talking about race. My generation, the twentysomethings, has never had a national conversation on the topic.
NEWS
May 21, 1992 | BY CHUCK STONE
"This is a day that the Lord hath made. Let us rejoice and be glad in it," the Rev. Jerry Lowry prayed. If God is a multicultural advocate (and she is), then it just doesn't get any better than this: a Native American Methodist minister, quoting a psalm by a Jewish king at a predominantly white Southern university in the Lumbee tribe's heartland, whose commencement speaker is a black Baptist. The Lumbees are America's second-largest tribe. But because of opposition by North Carolina's courtly antediluvian, Sen. Jesse Helms, the Bureau of Indian Affairs has refused to recognize the Lumbees as a legitimate tribe.
NEWS
March 3, 2004 | By Stephen Chernoski
Dear Grandfather, You never met me, so allow me to introduce myself. I am your 26-year-old grandson, born in 1977 - five years after you died. From what I have heard, you fought for our country in World War II and returned to start our family. Your contribution may have worn you down a bit and made life tougher, but you did it willingly. I often think about you, and have many questions. You see, Grandpa, our country was attacked on Sept. 11, 2001. That day changed me, as Pearl Harbor probably did you. I don't know how you initially reacted, but I haven't been able to live my life the same since.
NEWS
November 19, 1992 | by Matt Rohde, From the New York Times
This year my parents shocked me by turning 70. The tremor I felt, though, was small compared to the one a few years ago when my uncle retired, closing forever the doors of the corner shoe store started in 1909 by my grandfather. The loss of such a permanent fixture of those years of my youth was no less of a jolt than if, well, the Berlin Wall had suddenly disappeared. And now, among these signposts, many passing by too quickly these days to be read, is the election of Bill Clinton.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was 17 years before Frank McElroy heard his father talk about the Vietnam War. Before last fall, he never knew that his father, Joe, had sought comfort in a makeshift chapel in the middle of a jungle in Vietnam, and prayed to become a better soldier. Or that his father left the church that day a changed man, purged of his fear, and ready to fight a war he would never really understand. Until his father spoke to Frank's high school class last fall about his Vietnam experience, Frank McElroy admits that he did not really care, like many in his generation.
NEWS
May 12, 1991 | By Catherine Quillman, Special to The Inquirer
In some parts of southern Chester County, old wooden billboards, paint peeling like snakeskin, stand by the side of the road advertising orchards or hothouse plants. The condition of the signs generally means the business is long defunct, but not in the West Grove-Avondale area. In a region where commercial horticulture dates back to the early 1800s, a weathered sign may denote a long-established business. Or the owner may be simply too busy to put on a fresh coat of paint.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2016 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Tayyib Smith didn't grow up in a house where Forbes magazine landed on the doorstep every month or where marketing plans and contract negotiations were topics of discussion at the dinner table. Instead, Smith - chief operating officer and founder of the Little Giant creative agency, founder and publisher of two.one.five magazine, and partner in the Center City coworking space Pipeline Philly - found inspiration for his business acumen in more unconventional figures: Sean "Puffy" Combs, Jay Z, Dr. Dre. "I'm a serial entrepreneur from an undercapitalized community in a city with one-third poverty who has a GED," Smith said.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2016 | By Joel Naroff
I know, we are all getting tired of talking about nothing but millennials - unless, of course, you are a millennial. But when it comes to the economy, the transition to one that is millennial-driven is well underway, and the trend will continue for quite some time. That's actually a very good thing for the Philadelphia economy. Believe it or not, this region has almost all the qualities millennials look for when considering where to live. Unfortunately, that fact remains a secret - something we have to change.
NEWS
August 18, 2016
By Michael Gerson People always remember their first presidential vote - their first participation in the largest decision of American democracy. In high school, I was a rather awkward, nerdish history buff. (My wife would dispute the verb tense.) I was also something of a lefty, particularly compared with my conservative religious upbringing. I debated on behalf of Jimmy Carter in the mock election at my Christian high school during the 1980 election, making me a political minority of one. But my political identification had begun to shift by 1984, and I cast my first presidential vote for Ronald Reagan.
REAL_ESTATE
August 1, 2016 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
It's a living arrangement that brings startled reactions from two generations: A grandmother and granddaughter sharing seashore digs in Ocean City? Really? All that togetherness for almost three months, including most meals and lots of shared downtime? To 16-year-old Allison Schurr and her maternal grandma, Sharon Keller, it makes perfect sense. "It works, and it works beautifully," says Sharon, a soft-spoken woman who is delighted to go back to her own Shore roots - she grew up in Margate, and it's one of her happiest memories.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2016 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The craziness usually begins a full week before arrival day. "Are you bringing the corn? 18 ears?" demands the daughter who prides herself on administrative ability. "You're not on the sign-up sheet. " The sign-up sheet? For a fleeting moment, I want to remind this daughter that I'm her mother, once the maternal equivalent of a CEO, and a reasonably competent woman who knows that I'll be bringing more corn than they're likely to see in Kansas for our first night's dinner on Long Beach Island.
SPORTS
July 11, 2016 | By Paul Schwedelson, STAFF WRITER
As C.J. Sapong walked slowly off the field Saturday, the Talen Energy Stadium crowd of 18,463 lauded him with an orchestra of cheers. Sapong crossed his fists and greeted his substitute, Fabian Herbers, with a bump of the forearms. He then shook hands with coach Jim Curtin, who didn't say much to him before Sapong sat on the bench. With 11 minutes left in the game, Sapong had already done his part. "C.J. manhandled us," D.C. United coach Ben Olsen said. In his first MLS start since spraining his right ankle on June 1, Sapong helped create offensive chances and had an assist as the Union (8-6-5, 29 points)
BUSINESS
June 23, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Amir Showell, 15, wants to be a dermatologist when he grows up. "I'm interested in whiteheads, blackheads," said Showell, whose teenage complexion, by the way, is clear of all of the above. Too bad U.S. Health and Human Services official J. Nadine Gracia wasn't at Philadelphia's Roxborough High School last week to meet Showell, who, as a freshman, personifies the aims of a $6.4 million federal project spearheaded by her office. "I like medicine, but deep-down surgery, I can't stand that," Showell said.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
The Dukart men will not be celebrating Father's Day at McDonald's. They spend up to 12 hours a day, six days a week, under the Golden Arches, eating lots and lots of fries, burgers, and Chicken McNuggets. "We're already what you call super-heavy users," Joel Dukart said, explaining why he and brother Michael will treat their father, Les, to something other than a Happy Meal on Sunday. All three, plus Les' brother Alan, are principals in Dukart Management Corp., licensed operators of 11 Mickey D's throughout Pennsylvania and Delaware, with about 625 employees.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Eileen C. McDonnell, chief executive of Penn Mutual Life Insurance, was named Drexel's Business Leader of the Year. Sitting next to her at the April award luncheon were her brother Bill McDonnell and sister Barbara Kelnhofer. Not unusual, except when you consider that her siblings and their spouses moved from New York to Philadelphia to help raise their families en masse after McDonnell got the CEO job in 2013. In addition to running a company, Eileen McDonnell is a single mother and a baby boomer living in a three-generation household - part of a trend among Americans who want their elderly parents living with them and their children.
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