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Generation

NEWS
May 12, 1991 | By Catherine Quillman, Special to The Inquirer
In some parts of southern Chester County, old wooden billboards, paint peeling like snakeskin, stand by the side of the road advertising orchards or hothouse plants. The condition of the signs generally means the business is long defunct, but not in the West Grove-Avondale area. In a region where commercial horticulture dates back to the early 1800s, a weathered sign may denote a long-established business. Or the owner may be simply too busy to put on a fresh coat of paint.
NEWS
February 8, 2008 | By Morley Winograd and Michael D. Hais
The scene at American University was electric: thousands of young people filling an arena to hear Massachusetts Sen. Edward M. Kennedy endorse Barack Obama for president and praise the Illinois senator's ability to inspire and move a new generation of Americans. It was the perfect setting for Obama, who has been focused on this new "millennial generation" from the start. Almost a year ago, in a speech to African American leaders in Selma, Ala., he underlined the differences between two different types of generations: the "Moses generation" that led the children of Israel out of slavery and the "Joshua generation" that established the kingdom of Israel.
NEWS
October 8, 1988 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
One of the nicest things to have happened in dance recently is the resurgence of tap dancing. And one of the fine things about the resurgence is the way it has happened - with the younger generation seeking out the old- timers, persuading the veterans to teach them a thing or two, and then giving joint concerts. This two-generational look at tap dancing was on view last night at the Painted Bride Art Center, when tap master LaVaughn Robinson performed side by side with his young protege, Germaine Ingram.
NEWS
May 30, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Spend an evening with those who served in World War II, such as Stanley Meshkov, left, and they might tell you they're the luckiest generation. Daniel Rubin, B1.
NEWS
March 15, 1993 | by Jim Frederick, From the New York Times
Our elders would have us believe that we - the twentysomething generation, Generation X, the MTV generation - are doomed to fail, not in the least by our supposed grammatical ineptness. Paramount to our problems, they claim, is a tendency to pepper our dialogue with the word "like" as if it were a verbal tic, demonstrating our abysmal vocabularies and utter lack of neurological activity. Don't believe it. Much more than the random misfire of a stunted mind, "like" is actually a rhetorical device that demonstrates the speaker's heightened sensibility and offers the listener added levels of color, nuance and meaning.
NEWS
December 19, 1994 | BY HARLEY DAVID RUBIN
The Daily News recently asked in its, "In Our Opinion," editorial of its readers, "Who'll speak for Generation X?" While I can't speak for an entire generation, I can speak for myself. At 22, I fit neatly into the 18-28 age bracket that seems to constitute Generation X. Additionally, I'm a part-time grad student and unemployed writer. But that's where my similarity to the stereotypical "Xer" ends. In fact, I'm sure most people in my age bracket are nowhere near the, "slacker" stereotype the media has given us. The Daily News says we don't read newspapers.
NEWS
September 29, 1987 | By BRIAN SIANO
Please, somebody tell me. Why should we be concerned about the Baby Boom generation? I think I'm entitled to feel just a little neglected. Technically, I'm part of that demographic bulge; born in 1963, just in time to see John Kennedy on TV and actually remember men walking on the moon. All fine and dandy. But I'm on the tail end of the wave, which meant that I didn't listen to the Beatles until years after they'd broken up, and the TV shows from the 1950s, which my generation's supposed to remember so fondly, were available only in reruns.
NEWS
August 25, 2006
Philadelphia's beloved Smith Memorial Playground is really getting back into the swing of things. Thanks to donors and volunteers, another generation of children can create memories on beautiful summer afternoons. Shuttered in 2003 over safety concerns, the playground nearly closed for good until a nonprofit group formed to renovate the seven acres near 33d and Oxford Streets. The signature wooden slide reopened last summer, due to a generous gift from Strawberry Mansion native Ida Newman, who played there as a girl.
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Taylor Hospital's proposal to produce its own energy by building a co- generation plant on Bartol Avenue has prompted little enthusiasm on the Ridley Park Borough Council. Mayor Joseph Kilkenny and six council members discussed the plan at an information session Monday night, but they ended the session after two hours with more concerns than information. Borough Manager Harry McGrady said council members were concerned mainly about the site of the proposed plant, the noise it might create and its effect on traffic, public health and safety.
NEWS
June 17, 1989 | By RICHARD REEVES
It's hard to tell sometimes whether Ben Bradlee is kidding. But because he has a big job, executive editor of the Washington Post, you have to assume that he's not, that he means exactly what he says, no matter how flip it sounds. He gave the commencement address at Wake Forest University in Winston- Salem, N.C., the other day, talking mostly about the business, journalism, he has been in most of his life. "You must understand when you read a newspaper that people lie," was the best line in his text.
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