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BUSINESS
June 29, 2014 | From Staff and Wire Reports
United Technologies Corp.'s Sikorsky division won a $1.28 billion contract from the Air Force on Thursday for a new generation of combat rescue helicopters, though the impact for the company's Coatesville plant is unclear. Sikorsky is based in Stratford, Conn., but its operation in Coatesville employs about 875 people. The Chester County facility is involved in producing the new version of Marine One, which transports the president. That $1.24 billion contract was announced in May. The rescue helicopter contract begins with Sikorsky's developing an updated version of the Black Hawk helicopter to replace the aging and existing fleet, but the deal could eventually amount to 112 aircraft.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HAVING EIGHT children was not enough for Dorothy Reid. She loved children, and mealtimes at her North Philadelphia home could be a scene of barely controlled chaos, featuring not only her own brood but also their friends and neighbors, all happily feasting. "Our house was always full of children," said her son Robert. "Mom may have given birth to eight children, but there were always other children at our house at mealtimes. She fed all who were visiting. She loved children. " Dorothy Mae Reid, matriarch of four generations, a power sewing-machine operator for Philadelphia clothing manufacturers and an active churchwoman, died June 11. She was 93. "Mommy was known throughout North Philadelphia for her baking, especially her German sweet chocolate and Virginia pound cakes," said her daughter Beatrice.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Imani Bullock walked onto the stage Tuesday at the Kimmel Center to receive her diploma from Girls' High, she extended a tradition among women in her family that has endured for nearly a century. In 1917, Bullock's great-great-grandmother Lillian Stansbury graduated from Girls' High, setting the template. Bullock's great-grandmother Evelyn Spann followed in 1947. Over five generations, seven women in her family have graduated from the academically rigorous public school known officially as Philadelphia High School for Girls.
NEWS
June 17, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
George Palo is 90. He's repeating himself quite a bit these days and he's just had to downsize to a retirement community. He really misses his late wife. Soon, he will also miss his beloved dog, Max. This last bit of news caused a roomful of nurse educators to moan a sad, sympathetic, "Ohhhh" at a meeting last week at the Independence Blue Cross building in Center City. George is a fictional character, created along with two others to help nurses in training understand dementia and its traveling companions among the elderly: depression and delirium.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
They are a rarity, indeed: Grandmother, mother, daughter - all doctors. Even rarer: Because of the profession's relatively brief history of equal access, each woman's life experience illustrates the very different eras in which they received their training - and, in some cases, reared children. Geraldine Prose Young, who applied to medical school in the 1940s - against the odds - was scorned as an irresponsible mother. Nancy Young Melin, a generation later, was surrounded by many working mothers struggling to balance life and work.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Richard Greenberg's 1997 Three Days of Rain poses challenges for any company, and Quince Productions illustrates these difficulties in its unbalanced staging at Walnut Street Theatre's Studio 5. Three Days essentially is two plays set in the same run-down Manhattan studio. The first takes place in 1995 and involves Walker and Nan, children of Ned Janeway, a recently deceased member of a famous architectural team, and their friend Pip, son of the other architect, Theo Wexler.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
AT A BUCKS COUNTY Wendy's last month, Koustantinos Yiambilis was arrested for public drunkenness when he allegedly fell asleep at the fast-food restaurant with a cheeseburger still firmly in his hands. But now Yiambilis, 30, has far greater legal worries and far deeper nightmares to awake from after he was charged yesterday with the murder of his mother, whom police allege he killed with a portable generator. About 11:25 p.m. Monday, Bensalem police were called to the Longmeadow Apartments, on Bristol Road near Richlieu, by neighbors who reported fumes coming from the residence of Yiambilis' mother, Karen.
REAL_ESTATE
April 6, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
At age 77, Mark Semerjian says, his father, George, is winding down a long career as a custom builder on the Main Line that began in the 1970s. "He had a piece of land in Villanova and is building a spec house on it," said Mark, 41, of Semerjian Builders in Devon. He credits his father with teaching him many things about the business, especially the importance of being a "hands-on" builder. "He has always been hands-on, and everything was done in-house," including, after 1990, the drawings, "which he then would pass to a structural engineer," the younger Semerjian said.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
At this month's South by Southwest Music Festival in Austin, Texas, conversations among music fans sometimes began this way: "Hey, I saw a Philly band called ______. What's their story?" The name of one Philadelphia act was the one most frequently filling in that blank. That would be the Districts, the barely-out-of-high-school foursome fronted by singer Robby Grote, 19. The rising band from Lancaster County played SXSW in support of their self-titled five-song EP. They're now in the midst of a two-month national tour that comes to a close at the Sellersville Theater in Bucks County on Wednesday.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
PRESIDENT Obama's speech announcing a new initiative called "My Brother's Keeper," to focus on the plight of young men of color, was a major moment, not only for the Obama presidency but, potentially, for the country. Last week's speech was unusual for a number of reasons. While, of course, his daily presence as the leader of the free world can't be devoid of racial import, our black president has been cautious about using his platform to deal overtly with race; how cautious depends on how much you pay attention to Cornel West, who has routinely and brutally blasted Obama, at one point calling him a "Rockefeller Republican in blackface.
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