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Genetic Code

NEWS
August 12, 2009 | By Silvio Laccetti
Political corruption is not unique to any nation or state. It is a malady as old as civilization itself - a computer program or genetic code for living. Corruption has been the civilized way. Civilization offered the promise of more: more trade and commerce, more growth, more development, more jobs. The rulers cashed in; the masses had hopes of doing so. Since ancient times, civilization has tried to use law to curb the sins and arrogance, the influence-peddling and graft of the powerful.
NEWS
April 29, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By analyzing DNA from more than 2,000 autistic children, researchers have uncovered the best evidence yet for genetic links to the disorder - all tied to the way brain cells form and dissolve connections. The research effort, led by Hakon Hakonarson at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, used much larger samples than had been analyzed before to identify genetic differences between autistic subjects and controls. The CHOP group collaborated with Penn, UCLA, and other institutions, announcing their findings in two papers in today's issue of the journal Nature.
NEWS
December 18, 2008 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To scientists, it was a mystery. Most of the genetic material we carry in our cells seemed to have no purpose. It seemed so useless, some called it "junk DNA. " Weirder still, geneticists noticed that some of the junk has a life of its own, copying itself, viruslike, and jumping around the DNA. This phenomenon had never been documented in humans until geneticist Haig Kazazian started studying boys with the blood-clotting disorder hemophilia....
NEWS
January 25, 2008 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a major step toward the creation of artificial life, scientists are reporting today that they assembled the entire genetic code for a simple bacterium from scratch. The technique used to duplicate a real organism's DNA could allow the fashioning of novel organisms designed to, say, pump out new biofuels or absorb carbon dioxide, the researchers said. And by exploring the boundaries between the living and inanimate worlds, the work may change our understanding of the nature of life itself.
NEWS
February 25, 2007 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Months before the FDA's December announcement that meat from cloned animals is safe to eat, employees at Cyagra in Lancaster County were carving into cloned steaks several times a week. The Elizabethtown company clones cattle, so it volunteered samples from 11 clones and 11 ordinary cattle for tests requested by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. That left workers with a lot of leftovers, said Cyagra spokesman Steve Mower. They started with the steaks. When those ran out, they ate cloned hamburgers, tacos, lasagna and meat loaf, most of it prepared by the company's receptionist.
NEWS
February 12, 2007 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
What makes you different from everyone else on the planet may have less to do with the spelling of your genetic code than with a scattering of chemical "tags" that, like censor's marks, render some of your genes unreadable. The code itself, after all, is 99.9 percent identical in all of us, so these peripheral elements - referred to as epigenetics - offer a plausible reason human beings come in such a variety of shapes and sizes. As one recent paper suggested, epigenetics can explain why identical twins don't always look identical, especially as they get older.
NEWS
November 27, 2006 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Kari Stefansson set out to coax the secrets of the genetic code from the DNA of 100,000 volunteers, critics called the idea crazy - even unethical. Though his company has yet to turn a profit, he's proved himself to the scientific world with a series of findings connecting genes to 15 disorders including stroke, diabetes and asthma. His gene-hunting concept worked so well that two teams of attorneys have been fighting over it in a federal courtroom in Philadelphia for much of the fall.
NEWS
October 12, 2006 | By Pam Lobley
Do you have the feeling you're related to someone famous? Maybe it's an uncanny sense that Mozart was your ancestor. Or that Genghis Khan might be in your family tree. That affinity you feel for ancient Rome can't be an accident, can it? Touring the toppled ruins of columns and friezes in the ancient city stirs something in you. Perhaps one or your ancestors was one of those emperors, or perhaps just a Roman soldier. It's in your blood. Now, with a simple swab of your cheek and a few hundred dollars, you can find out. Commercial genetic genealogy is barely five years old, but already it is proving irresistible to many.
NEWS
March 13, 2006 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was a nice idea that we're all genetically 99.9 percent identical, but new research says it's not so simple. The old thinking held that coiled in our cells, we all carry the same instruction book with just a few alternative spellings. But upon closer scrutiny, it appears our DNA is full of long strings of genetic code that are copied sometimes hundreds of times, the number of copies varying wildly from person to person. And each of us is apparently missing quite a few large chunks of DNA. Other large segments of genetic code are misplaced on their chromosomes or pasted in backward.
NEWS
February 3, 2003 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the near future, individuals may be able to pinpoint which diseases they should worry most about - heart disease, Alzheimer's, stroke, prostate cancer or multiple sclerosis. The medical crystal ball will be high-tech, inexpensive, personal genetic testing, which could be available in just five to 10 years, according to some medical researchers. "This will create a profound revolution in medicine," predicts Leroy Hood, a molecular biologist at the University of Washington.
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