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Genetics

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NEWS
January 21, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas R. Kadesch, 58, of Bala Cynwyd, interim chair of the department of genetics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine since 2006, died Wednesday, Jan. 12, after pancreatic surgery at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. A Penn spokeswoman stated that "Dr. Kadesch's research concentrated on ways in which cells control the expression of their genes. " In recent years, she stated, "his lab focused on a particular molecular process called the Notch signaling pathway that is critical to cell differentiation.
NEWS
February 14, 2016
* A project called Darwin's Dogs is collecting anecdotal and genetic information from up to 5,000 dogs in the hope of learning more about genetic links to conditions such as cognitive dysfunction - similar to dementia or Alzheimer's disease in humans - and canine compulsive disorder, which causes dogs to lick, chew, spin, chase or perform other behaviors in an exaggerated manner. The 3,000 dogs enrolled in the study so far include purebreds and mixed breeds. * Looking to adopt a cat?
NEWS
October 13, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
STRASBURG, Pa. - Weeks after his birth in 2001, Benjamin Glick was stricken with a mysterious illness. He would vomit and pass out. He wouldn't eat and lost weight. Over five agonizing months, his parents took him to 12 doctors at six hospitals in the Philadelphia area. "He was fading out, we were going to lose him," said his father, Amos Glick, who is Old Order Amish and runs a foundry in Chester County. It took a clinic in a Lancaster County cornfield to save the boy. Doctors at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia sent the family to the Clinic for Special Children in Strasburg.
SPORTS
March 31, 2011 | 'By Daniel I. Dorfman, For The Inquirer
The Nolan Ryan biography has so many amazing parts. The 324 wins, the 5,714 strikeouts, the seven no-hitters, and the 12 one-hitters. But one part of his career almost defies logic: his durability. From 1971 to 1992 - when he was 45 years old - the pitcher dubbed "The Ryan Express" started at least 26 games every season with the exception of the strike-shortened 1981 campaign. And that was despite shoulder surgery after the 1975 season. It was even more remarkable considering Ryan was not a knuckleballer or a soft tosser but instead threw 100 m.p.h.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2007 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new $39 million genetics center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia will survive a high-stakes lawsuit claiming that the center's director, Hakon Hakonarson, conspired with other Children's researchers to steal company secrets. The suit was filed last year by Hakonarson's former employer, deCODE genetics, in Iceland. A settlement announced yesterday will allow Hakonarson and his colleagues to continue their research. Any money that Children's is paying deCODE and other details of the settlement were kept confidential.
NEWS
November 30, 1997 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It was only a few drops of blood discovered at the scene of the "crime," but it was enough for students in Patricia Sidelsky's genetics class to solve the Mystery of the Theft of the Tulum Riches. Was it Suspect No. 1, Caroline Krisciunas, a Cherokee High School biology teacher who became fascinated by Mayan culture and on a vacation visited Tulum in the rain forests of Central America? "I had a flat tire in Iowa," Krisciunas said. "I didn't see any jewels, just cornfields on the night of the crime.
LIVING
March 27, 1995 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Francine Essien is still afraid of mice. You wouldn't know it by looking at her animal colony in her Rutgers University laboratory - it's full of them. And you certainly wouldn't get a clue by the way she deftly handles the creatures she considers the lifeline for her research in genetics. But mice of the kitchen-floor variety still send Essien scurrying for higher ground. "I'm still afraid of those," Essien said. "Some once made a nest in my garage. I went crazy. " But the point, and it's a point that Essien makes to her students over and over again, is that anyone is capable of overcoming an obstacle to fulfill a dream - even a poor girl from Philadelphia with a fear of mice.
NEWS
March 6, 1995 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Tucker's antenna went up when Francis L. Lawrence said those three words. After all, Tucker had just spent six years researching, then refuting the validity of such statements as made by the Rutgers University president. Tucker might have pulled out his book, The Science and Politics of Racial Research, when Lawrence said that African American students lacked the "genetic hereditary background" to score well on standardized tests. But Tucker, a Princeton-trained, professor of psychology for 21 years on the Rutgers-Camden campus, doesn't want to get sucked into the controversy spawned by Lawrence - his boss.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | By Marjorie Keen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Consider the global economy. A decade ago, Loren Ruth was in college for hands-on training in dairy herd management. Today, Ruth's hands are more often on the phone and the fax machine than on cows. Instead of milking the registered Jersey cattle he keeps on Stony Run Farm in East Vincent, Ruth exports their genetics in the form of embryos and semen to farmers in Australia and New Zealand. "I never anticipated that I'd be working in international marketing," Ruth, 29, said recently.
NEWS
December 10, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you were at high risk for a deadly, untreatable disease, would you want to know it? Would you want to join a clinical trial? Alzheimer's researchers are hoping that a lot of people are so eager to find a cure that they will answer yes to both those questions. GeneMatch, an ambitious, national effort to recruit people at high genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease, was launched Tuesday by the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix and will include a key role for University of Pennsylvania researchers.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
August 10, 2016 | By Casey Gilman, Staff Writer
Imagine a world where the milk you drink doesn't come from cows, but yeast. The fuel in your car isn't pumped from beneath the earth's crust, but is renewably produced by microbes. And your house was built from bricks cured with bacteria rather than heat. These are the kinds of innovative solutions to environmental and industrial problems that are being tested. Some are already on the market, fueling the biotechnology boom. "It's one of the fastest-growing industries in America," said Orkan Telhan, an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Design.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By Casey Gilman, Staff Writer
Backyard barbecuing or sitting around a campfire in the summer, toasty hands and roasted chestnuts in the winter - in any season, people love a nice fire. And in the smoke that those flames produce, scientists may have found a clue to the success of our species. For prehistoric humans, including Neanderthals, fire was their technology, providing heat, light, and a means of making more foods digestible. But when they made those fires in caves, they would also inhale great quantities of smoke and its toxic chemicals.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Men with metastatic prostate cancer have a surprisingly high rate of inherited mutations in DNA-repair genes, suggesting that all men with such advanced prostate cancer should be considered for genetic testing, a new study concludes. Genetic testing is not recommended for men with cancer confined to the prostate - or men whose cancer later spreads - because studies have found less than 5 percent have defective DNA-repair genes. But the prevalence of such defects among men who are initially diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer has been unclear, according to the new study, published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine by researchers from six leading cancer centers in the United States and Britain.
NEWS
May 2, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
With rescue dogs all the rage and shelters overflowing with homeless dogs, it seemed a little ironic to hear veterinarians talk Saturday about how to solve canine fertility problems. But their audience was a serious, sophisticated group of about 40 dog breeders who had traveled from as far away as North Carolina to learn about reproduction, genetics, behavior, and the dog microbiome at a scientific conference at the University of Pennsylvania. Specialized vets now monitor hormones closely to improve the odds of conception.
NEWS
February 14, 2016
* A project called Darwin's Dogs is collecting anecdotal and genetic information from up to 5,000 dogs in the hope of learning more about genetic links to conditions such as cognitive dysfunction - similar to dementia or Alzheimer's disease in humans - and canine compulsive disorder, which causes dogs to lick, chew, spin, chase or perform other behaviors in an exaggerated manner. The 3,000 dogs enrolled in the study so far include purebreds and mixed breeds. * Looking to adopt a cat?
NEWS
February 7, 2016 | By Julie Appleby, KAISER HEALTH NEWS
Independence Blue Cross' announcement that it will cover a complex type of genetic testing for some cancer patients thrusts the insurer into the debate about how to handle an increasing array of these expensive tests. The Philadelphia-based insurer - with 3 million members - became the largest to cover whole genome sequencing for select cancer patients. The analysis looks at the entire sequence of each tumor's DNA and identifies mutated genes. Physicians can request this for children with tumors, patients with rare cancers, and those with triple negative breast cancer or who have exhausted conventional therapies for metastatic cancer.
NEWS
December 10, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you were at high risk for a deadly, untreatable disease, would you want to know it? Would you want to join a clinical trial? Alzheimer's researchers are hoping that a lot of people are so eager to find a cure that they will answer yes to both those questions. GeneMatch, an ambitious, national effort to recruit people at high genetic risk for Alzheimer's disease, was launched Tuesday by the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix and will include a key role for University of Pennsylvania researchers.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nemours Children's Health System and the Clinic for Special Children in Lancaster County signed a five-year agreement to collaborate on the care of children with rare genetic disorders, the two tax-exempt organizations announced. As part of the arrangement, the Clinic for Special Children will help Nemours develop medical services for the Old Order Amish community near Dover, Del. The clinic, near Strasburg, Pa., was founded in 1989 to treat Old Order Amish and Mennonite children with genetic disorders.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Fragrant steam unfurls from stovetop pots of organic applesauce as volunteers chop carrots, scallions, and lotus root for a Korean condiment called kimchi . It's a chilly afternoon, and the basement of St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Collingswood is cozy with the aromas of food and the convivial sounds of its communal preparation. Who knew political advocacy could be so . . . appetizing? "If it were just a matter of calling legislators and meeting with [politicians]
NEWS
September 6, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
African American women are less likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than white women, yet are more likely to die of the disease. To some degree, this disturbing disparity reflects differences in patterns of care, which may involve socioeconomic factors. Studies show that black women tend to be diagnosed at a later stage and often have trouble accessing treatment. But that doesn't fully explain the racial survival imbalance, so increasingly, researchers are looking for biological differences.
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