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January 18, 2002 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
Switzerland will celebrate with a five-franc coin the 400th anniversary of the battle in which Geneva withstood an assault by the Duke of Savoy's armies. The Savoyards tried to capture the city by scaling its walls with ladders. Geneva has long made the event the basis for a December frolic called Escalade. Switzerland remains outside the European Union and continues to strike francs. The cupronickel coin features a gold-colored center and nickel ring. The reverse core shows the ladders leaning against the walls.
NEWS
June 19, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges, one of Latin America's most influential authors, was buried here yesterday in the city where he spent much of his youth and the last three months of his life. Doctors at City Hospital announced yesterday that Borges had died of cancer of the liver. They said the family had asked them to make the announcement because of "unsubstantiated press reports" in Latin America that Borges had committed suicide. The hospital's statement said that Borges, who was 86, had to be hospitalized for liver cancer in January and February and again in April, and that heart problems also appeared.
NEWS
May 29, 1994 | By Nancy Grace, FOR THE INQUIRER
Only a few travelers choose to stay in Geneva's birthplace, Vielle Ville, a hilltop city within the city, where a 20-minute drive from the airport takes you back 500 years. Instead of checking into one of the large, expensive lakefront hotels when visiting Geneva, you can stay in a small hotel here in the Old City - far removed from the tempos of a modern world. Instead of traffic noise, you can listen to the sounds of fountains. Days and nights are orchestrated by the sound of bells.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
State Department security officers yesterday intercepted a department investigator shortly before he was to tell congressional officials about his report that Defense Secretary-designate John G. Tower kept mistresses in Geneva while he was a member of the U.S. arms control delegation, congressional sources said. The investigator, Berne M. Indahl, was met by two State Department security officers moments after he arrived in New York on an overseas flight. Indahl was escorted to Washington, interviewed in his suburban Virginia hotel room by FBI agents and barred by his superiors from talking to anyone about the case until Tuesday, said an aide to Rep. John D. Dingell (D., Mich.
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | Associated Press
GENEVA - More than 140 nations adopted the first legally binding international treaty Saturday aimed at reducing mercury emissions, U.N. officials said. The U.N. Environment Program said the treaty was adopted after all-night negotiations that capped a week of talks in Geneva. A signing ceremony will be held later in the year, and then nations must begin formally ratifying it before it comes into force several years from now. "To agree on global targets is not easy to do," UNEP executive director Achim Steiner said.
NEWS
February 19, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Two Soviet officials said separately yesterday that imprisoned Jewish activist Joseph Begun would be set free, and one added that Begun would return home "very soon. " But Begun's son said his father remained in prison last night. One official, Georgi Arbatov, was quoted as saying, "I know from official sources that a decision has been made to set him free. " He added that the Jewish activist would return home "very soon. " A second official, Samuel Zivs, said in Geneva that Soviet President Andrei Gromyko or one of his deputies signed an unconditional pardon for Begun on Tuesday, and that the activist should have been freed yesterday.
NEWS
January 2, 1986 | By James McCartney, Inquirer Washington Bureau (Inquirer Washington Bureau reporter Ellen Warren, in Palm Springs, Calif., contributed to this article.)
President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev exchanged messages of peace yesterday in rare telecasts to the peoples of one another's countries, launching the new year, as Gorbachev put it, "with a hopeful sign of change. " But continuing differences between the two over Reagan's "Star Wars" program emerged in their presentations. Reagan argued for the development of new defensive nuclear systems, and Gorbachev pleaded for steps to keep "outer space peaceful. " The overall tone of their separate messages, however, reflected optimism that the summit meeting in Geneva in November has opened the door to the development of a new and more promising relationship.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1992 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In a sense, theater is one of the construction arts, not unlike engineering or architecture. And few of its experiences are more exhilarating than the act of watching a playwright spread out an array of seemingly unrelated worlds and people and ideas, then slowly gather them up and balance them until each fits snugly into the next, creating a structure in which the individuality of each part is subsumed in the whole. That's what is going on nightly at the Annenberg Center's Zellerbach Theatre, where Lanford Wilson's Redwood Curtain opened Wednesday for a run through March 29. The play, which had its world premiere two months ago in Seattle and is scheduled for Broadway next season, introduces us to three quite disparate characters, then pairs them off in various duos until it brings them all together for a conclusion that seems as inevitable as it is magical.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Those who oppose greater U.S. involvement in Syria were no doubt relieved at the announcement that Moscow and Washington want to convene an international conference to end the country's civil war. They shouldn't be. Secretary of State John Kerry's announcement contains no hint of a diplomatic breakthrough. Indeed, diplomacy stands no chance unless President Obama first does what he has long avoided: takes the lead in helping the Syrian opposition break the military stalemate on the ground.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
Egypt walks out of nuclear talks GENEVA, Switzerland - Egypt walked out of a round of global nuclear talks in protest Monday, saying other nations are not acting quickly enough to establish the Middle East as a zone free of nuclear weapons. A statement from Egypt's foreign ministry said the nation ended its participation in two weeks of Geneva talks out of frustration that the zone has yet to be created. The talks run through this week. "We can't wait forever for the implementation of this decision," said the ministry's statement Monday night, explaining that Egypt's walkout was meant to send a message to the world that it can no longer accept what it considers to be a lack of seriousness on the issue.
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NEWS
December 20, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
IN HER MORE mature years, Marcella Roane wouldn't be seen outdoors without being fashionably turned out, complete with a stylish hat. In fact, her hats became a kind of trademark for Marcella, and she had a collection of them, along with the handkerchiefs she liked to carry. "She had a collection of both for any occasion, no matter how big or small," her family said. Marcella Geneva Roane, a retired employee of the Veterans Administration, an expert cook who inspired her daughter to open popular soul-food restaurants, an active churchwoman and a devoted family matriarch, died Sunday.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Those who oppose greater U.S. involvement in Syria were no doubt relieved at the announcement that Moscow and Washington want to convene an international conference to end the country's civil war. They shouldn't be. Secretary of State John Kerry's announcement contains no hint of a diplomatic breakthrough. Indeed, diplomacy stands no chance unless President Obama first does what he has long avoided: takes the lead in helping the Syrian opposition break the military stalemate on the ground.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
Egypt walks out of nuclear talks GENEVA, Switzerland - Egypt walked out of a round of global nuclear talks in protest Monday, saying other nations are not acting quickly enough to establish the Middle East as a zone free of nuclear weapons. A statement from Egypt's foreign ministry said the nation ended its participation in two weeks of Geneva talks out of frustration that the zone has yet to be created. The talks run through this week. "We can't wait forever for the implementation of this decision," said the ministry's statement Monday night, explaining that Egypt's walkout was meant to send a message to the world that it can no longer accept what it considers to be a lack of seriousness on the issue.
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | Associated Press
GENEVA - More than 140 nations adopted the first legally binding international treaty Saturday aimed at reducing mercury emissions, U.N. officials said. The U.N. Environment Program said the treaty was adopted after all-night negotiations that capped a week of talks in Geneva. A signing ceremony will be held later in the year, and then nations must begin formally ratifying it before it comes into force several years from now. "To agree on global targets is not easy to do," UNEP executive director Achim Steiner said.
NEWS
February 22, 2012 | By Joe Mandak, Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - A college in Western Pennsylvania sued the federal government Tuesday, saying regulations that require employers to offer birth-control coverage that includes drugs that abort fertilized embryos are "directly at odds" with its religious values, including the Sixth Commandment. The Alliance Defense Fund filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court on behalf of Geneva College. The school in Beaver Falls is associated with the Reformed Presbyterian Church of North America.
NEWS
October 10, 2011 | By Charles Krauthammer
"We don't allow faster-than-light neutrinos in here," says the bartender. A neutrino walks into a bar. - Joke circulating on the Internet The world as we know it is on the brink of disintegration, on the verge of dissolution. No, I'm not talking about the collapse of the euro, international finance, the Western economies, the democratic future, the unipolar moment, the American dream, French banks, Greece as a going concern, Europe as an idea, or the Pax Americana.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Comedies about infidelity, or perceived infidelity, or thwarted infidelity, have been a staple of moviedom from the silent-screen era to the last two dozen Judd Apatow ripoffs. What distinguishes The Dilemma in this genre is its resounding unfunnyness, its emotional dishonesty, and the general unlikability of its cast of characters. Directed by Ron Howard and starring Vince Vaughn and Kevin James as best buds and business partners, The Dilemma begins over a dinner between friends: Ronny (Vaughn)
NEWS
July 12, 2006
Remember back when the Bush administration concluded that the war on terror "renders obsolete" the Geneva Conventions and their "strict limitations on questioning of enemy prisoners and renders quaint some" provisions? Well, what once was quaint ain't. In a stunning reversal of its policies for treating detainees at the Guant?namo, Cuba, prison and other jails abroad holding terror suspects, the administration yesterday finally came around to the right policy, albeit late.
NEWS
May 6, 2006 | By Matthew Schofield INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
U.S. officials yesterday defended the country against allegations that it had allowed the torture of prisoners in Iraq, Afghanistan, and the U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, saying the United States had an "absolute commitment" to eradicating torture and preventing abuse. The U.N. Committee Against Torture met the defense with skepticism, accusing American officials of playing word games and of mounting a legalistic defense rather than confronting specific accusations of prisoner abuse.
NEWS
January 5, 2005 | By Frank Davies INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Does Alberto Gonzales, President Bush's choice to be the next attorney general, believe that the President has inherent powers to override laws and treaties and allow torture? Does he still think the Geneva Conventions, the treaty establishing standards of fair treatment of prisoners of war, are "obsolete" when it comes to interrogating terrorist suspects? And can Gonzales make the transition from White House counsel - known for zealous loyalty to his client, George Bush - to become attorney general, the nation's top law-enforcement official and protector of the rule of law?
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