FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 2, 2012
It's a museum with limited hours and a low profile, yet the Stephen Girard Collection provides an extraordinary look at one of the most remarkable figures in Philadelphia's history. Currents, C1.
NEWS
May 16, 1992 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / MICHAEL S. WIRTZ
A painting by Pablo Picasso awaits inspection as Gerrit Meaker (in background) uncrates another at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Museum workers yesterday were busy preparing for "Picasso and Things: The Still Lifes of Picasso," opening June 9.
NEWS
July 19, 2006
TRADE ALLEN Iverson? Sure - and while you're at it, mock Michelangelo, damn Da Vinci, punish Patton, spurn Spartacus and assassinate Alexander the Great. It's known as genius genocide, and it's as old as history itself. Allen Iverson is an immature child, who would rather be hailed as the "jitter bug" king of the hip-hop nation than as the greatest "small man" to ever play any sport, anytime, anywhere. But despite his own ludicrous priorities, he is a unique, rare, genius-gem: A class "A" enigma!
NEWS
April 17, 2003 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
History offers many sad examples of the fate that can await the child of a genius, and the case of Lucia Joyce, the only daughter of James Joyce, is among the most tragic and painful. Lucia was persuaded that her artistic stature rivaled that of her father. As she insists in James Joyce Is Dead and So Is Paris: The Lucia Joyce Cabaret, "they say there can be only one genius in a family. As you can see, there were two in mine. " The character makes the claim from the secured ward of an English mental hospital that forms the setting for the Pig Iron Theatre Company's collaborative production.
NEWS
July 21, 1986 | BY DONALD KAUL
You think life isn't unfair? The MacArthur Foundation gave out its genius awards last week, and I didn't get one. I feel like Stephen Spielberg at Academy Award time. You know about the MacArthur awards? They are the best awards known to man. Every year or so, the Chicago-based philanthropy, one of the nation's wealthiest, picks worthy individuals - geniuses, some say - to give money to. You can't apply for the awards, you don't even know you're being considered. Secret "talent scouts" propose names confidentially.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1995 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Hollywood's record with the lives of great painters is not generally a pretty picture. In 1976, British filmmaker Peter Watkins proved that the genius and torment of the artist could be brought to vivid life in Edvard Munch. Watkins came to this imaginative assessment of the Norwegian expressionist after making his documentary Culloden for British television. He brought the same diligent eye for detail to Munch as he did to the re-creation of a pivotal battle in Scottish history.
NEWS
December 25, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Late sci-fi scribe Philip K. Dick's reality-skewing mind games have long been fertile ground for Hollywood. But with the successes of Blade Runner and Total Recall have come things such as the dinky Impostor, with Gary Sinise, and the cold, grandiose Spielberg experiment, A.I. Paycheck, despite its cool concept, belongs with the likes of Impostor: a near-future tale of paranoia and suspense of disappointingly generic proportions. Ben Affleck, sporting devastatingly hip shades, stars as Michael Jennings, a "world-famous genius" (that's what it says in the production notes)
NEWS
October 2, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
If timing is everything, there's no better time for "Flash of Genius" and its story of the Little Guy getting ripped off by Big Business. In the fact-based "Flash of Genius," the man against the system is Robert Kearns, a professor/inventor who designs and builds the first intermittent windshield wiper back in the '60s. At the movie's outset, director Marc Abraham paints Kearns in throwback, Disney shades - a lovable nutty professor, tinkering in his basement, surrounded by a large, adoring family (the movie has a low-budget, plain-wrapper feel that actually complements its shallow-pockets protagonist)
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alan Turing was a classic example of the genius who was brilliant in his field and impractical to the point of irresponsibility about the business of living. One of the finest mathematical minds of the century, Turing took a major role in breaking the German Enigma military code in World War II and laid the intellectual groundwork for the development of the electronic computer. He died in 1954 at the age of 42, and it was his decided lack of genius at managing his personal life that led to his death.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1997 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
No, Steve Martin does not appear in Picasso at the Lapin Agile, the very funny comedy that opened on Tuesday at the Merriam Theatre. The white-haired comedian wouldn't quite be right, after all, for either of the principal roles in this intermissionless, 90-minute evening: Pablo Picasso, the well-known painter, or Albert Einstein, the well-known theorist. He'd probably be just fine as Charles Dabernow Schmendiman, the two-bit inventor who thinks himself the only true immortal among the folk who frequent the Parisian watering hole of the play's title, but you won't find him in that part, either.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Oscar Wilde: From the Depths is a bio-drama about the author of some of the most delightfully witty social comedies ever written. Lantern Theater Company is presenting the world premiere of Charles McMahon's play - in which delight, wit, social comedy, and general theatrical joy are in very short supply. This is Wilde in earnest mode, sloshing around in self-pity and sentimentality, reciting long passages from his books as though they were conversation. The play's subtitle is the English version of De Profundis , Wilde's long letter to his lover, Bosie, which he wrote while in prison for "gross indecency.
SPORTS
December 14, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Chip Kelly and Rex Ryan were geniuses at different times for the same amount of time: two years. That's how long each of them had atop that pedestal before the rest of the NFL knocked them off. If you're a head coach and want to be a genius for more than two years, you'd better have Joe Montana or Tom Brady as your quarterback. Otherwise, there will be a reckoning, and it will be humbling. Kelly's reckoning, of course, began in the final four weeks of last season, his second with the Eagles, and has continued through the first 12 weeks of this one. His up-tempo, simplified-playbook approach to offense doesn't catch opponents off guard as often as it once did, and his reliance on a rigorous sports science program has at times inspired eye rolls from at least some of his players.
SPORTS
December 8, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
FOXBOROUGH, Mass. - The scoreboard decides genius and makes its final judgment over years and decades, not days and weeks. It always looks a lot smarter to win than to lose. Time has already made a call on New England coach Bill Belichick, who has built a football edifice that, even if it fell right now, would still be ranked among the most enduring in NFL history. Chip Kelly? Well, the jury is sequestered and has asked for reams of additional evidence. Get back to us on that one. But if a football analyst from any era took a hard look at the Sunday game between the Patriots and the Eagles, it would be really difficult to determine which guy is the genius and which is considered several answers short of a good SAT score.
NEWS
October 2, 2015 | By Matthew Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jacob Soll was walking on the University of Pennsylvania campus on a rainy September day in 2011, thinking his career might as well be over. The Boston-bred son of a single mother, Soll held a doctorate in history from Cambridge University and was a tenured professor at Rutgers-Camden. But he thought that his groundbreaking research on early modern Europe was not having an impact. He earned far less than his peers, and lived with his wife and two young daughters in a West Philadelphia home whose roof was literally caving in. "I felt completely hopeless," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2015 | Inquirer Staff
Carrey: Deeply saddened Jim Carrey , 53, on Tuesday spoke up about his gf of three years, Cathriona White , who died Monday of an apparent suicide. Carrey said he was deeply saddened by her death. "She was a truly kind and delicate Irish flower, too sensitive for this soil, to whom loving . . . was all that sparkled. " Mimi Lien wins genius grant You may have seen her work at a performance of BalletX, Pig Iron Theatre Company, or at FringeArts. Perhaps you noticed but not really.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
WHEN YOU WRITE about celebrities every day, it's not often that you get to write about geniuses. But once a year the MacArthur Foundation gives out its "genius" grants, and after we get over the heartbreak of again not winning (people think cracking wise on Kanye West is so easy), we like to mention the people who won. Newly minted "Black Panther" writer Ta-Nehisi Coates and "Hamilton" composer/writer/star Lin-Manuel Miranda are two of the bold-faced names on this year's list of 24. Each receive $625,000, paid out in quarterly installments over five years.
NEWS
September 4, 2015 | Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
FROM TIME to time, I like to check in with the U.S. Patent Office for a progress report on the exciting field of beer inventions. Over the years, we've seen brilliant ideas, ranging from tooth protectors on beer bottles to beer pong tables that keep your beer cold. Honestly, if we could channel some of that ingenuity into, say, theoretical aerodynamics, we'd have those rocket packs by now. So, what's new? Here's a handful of recent patent applications. * Shotgun Accessible Beer Can (#2015-0183547)
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
For years, Jason Segel has proved himself a reliably funny dude, a comic foil and sometimes-leading man in rom-coms, brom-coms, and a sitcom, too. Knocked Up, Forgetting Sarah Marshall, I Love You Man, The Five-Year Engagement, and nine seasons' worth of the CBS hit How I Met Your Mother - the guy's comedy cred is without question. But Segel, like comic actors before him (Bill Murray and Robin Williams, to name two), was itching to try something different, something with more heft, more meaning.
SPORTS
June 20, 2015 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Inquirer reported Tuesday that former coach Larry Brown has been lobbying the 76ers to hire Allen Iverson as an assistant general manager. There is one person who wholeheartedly supports that move: Iverson himself. "I may not know everything about physical talent or anything like that, but I have a sharp mind when it comes to that look, being able to look into somebody's eyes to tell if they are going to be in the foxhole with you tonight or if they are not," Iverson said Thursday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2015 | BY TOM DI NARDO, For the Daily News
SIXTY years after his death, Charlie Parker's status as a jazz alto saxophonist supreme remains one of American music's most enigmatic legacies. Plagued by drug abuse, racism, the compulsive need for female guidance and the burden of musical genius, the man known as "Yardbird" - or simply "Bird" - lived a brief life filled with passion, tragedy and unforgettable characters: the core ingredients of opera. "Yardbird," Opera Philadelphia's first world premiere since its first season 40 years ago, is told in flashbacks after Parker's death at only 34, in 1955.
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