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Genocide

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NEWS
April 17, 1998
The 20th century is easily the bloodiest century on record in terms of concentrated attempts to wipe out large numbers of people. Below is a list of some of this century's most horrible genocides. 1915: Ottoman Turks kill more than 1 million Armenians. 1930s: Josef Stalin orchestrates a campaign that erases 15-20 million people in Russia and Ukraine. 1939-45: Adolf Hitler employs genocide as an adjunct of his war effort, culminating in the "final solution," which leads to the deaths of 6 million Jews and at least 3 million others.
NEWS
October 18, 2007
When Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D., Calif.) rose to the highest office in the U.S. House of Representatives and the third highest in the land, she was obliged to set priorities that are in the nation's best interest. She can do just that by pulling a very ill-timed resolution from a full House vote. Former backers are running away from it in droves, as they should. The nonbinding resolution would have labeled as genocide the 1915-1923 slaughter of up to 1.5 million Armenians in what is now called Turkey.
NEWS
July 22, 2004
Let's call it what it is: genocide. The targeting of black ethnic groups in Sudan's Darfur region - fomented by the Sudanese government - is genocide. The fighting started after some rebels in Darfur began fighting government forces. It has gone well beyond a political battle, though. The government of Sudan struck back by arming and supporting Arab nomadic militias known as the Janjaweed. Thousands of civilians have been murdered, raped and displaced by these militias.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Capt. Brian Steidle, USMC, trained to shoot guns, not pictures. But in the killing fields of Darfur, the American soldier-turned-African Union observer found that a camera was his most effective weapon. During 2004, Steidle photographed the carnage wrought by Sudanese Arab militias, or "Janjaweed" ("devil on horseback"), against the mostly black villagers in the Darfur region. Over 200,000 civilians have been killed and millions more displaced. Steidle accumulated conclusive evidence of genocide.
NEWS
July 12, 2008
RE MINISTER Meritazon's recent op-ed on reparations: First off, sir, study your history before sticking your hand out for something no one alive today was responsible for that happened 300 years ago. The rich African war lords enslaved their own people, then figured a way to make even more money by selling them to anyone willing to pay. Second, don't you know that men, women and children are still forced into slavery every day in...
NEWS
November 27, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The films of Atom Egoyan are an angular kind of survival guide. He is preoccupied with how people survive the passing of loved ones, how from death they reap meaning in life. In The Sweet Hereafter (1997) and Exotica (1994), Egoyan was less interested in probing the raw wounds of grief than in exploring how the living break through the fog of sorrow. The result: contemplative and lyrical films that make visible the invisible process of healing. It sounds paradoxical, but Ararat, the latest movie from the Canadian director of Armenian descent, is politically Egoyan's most personal film and emotionally his most distant.
NEWS
July 30, 1998
It is an outrage that the United States is trying to hobble efforts to create an International Criminal Court with power to try cases of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. The U.S. obsession is that such a court somehow, some day, might try a U.S. citizen. Forgive our heresy, but if an American did commit genocide, why not? Not many people have been falsely accused of trying to wipe out a race or ethnic group. Or are the people who say things like "Hitler didn't do it" to be taken seriously?
NEWS
November 5, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
More than four decades after the horror of the Holocaust, President Reagan yesterday signed legislation making genocide a crime under U.S. law, marking the end of a 40-year struggle to implement a treaty first endorsed by President Harry S. Truman. The measure, which Reagan signed in a ceremony at O'Hare International Airport, adds the United States to a list of 95 countries that have approved the United Nations pact. The treaty makes genocide - the deliberate destruction of a specific population - punishable under U.S. law and sets stern penalties for violators.
NEWS
December 18, 2011 | By Suzan Fraser, Associated Press
ANKARA, Turkey - Turkey's prime minister on Saturday sharply criticized France for a bill that would make it a crime to deny that the World War I-era mass killing of Armenians was genocide. Saying France should investigate what he claimed was its own "dirty and bloody history" in Algeria and Rwanda, Recep Tayyip Erdogan insisted Turkey would respond "through all kinds of diplomatic means. " Historians estimate that as many as 1.5 million Armenians were killed by Ottoman Turks as their empire collapsed, an event many international experts regard as genocide and that France recognized as such in 2001.
NEWS
May 17, 1994 | by Alison Des Forges, New York Times
The genocide in Rwanda began on April 6, when extremist Hutus used the death of President Juvenal Habyarimana as a pretext for slaughtering members of the Tutsi minority. Five weeks and 200,000 lives later, the killing goes on. Governments hesitate to call the horror by its name, for to do so would oblige them to act: Signatories to the Convention for the Prevention of Genocide, including the United States, are legally bound to "prevent and punish" it. Yet whether we call it genocide or not, our government and others must pledge never to aid a regime built on the bodies of 200,000 unarmed civilians.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 30, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
  At the front of the Abramson Center for Jewish Life synagogue on Monday, 8-year-old Isabella Chelder learned that Ester Auerbach lost everything when she was about Isabella's age. The Nazis turned Auerbach's community into a ghetto. They took her from her parents, and she never saw them again. About 100 people gathered at the center in North Wales for a ceremony to remember the millions of Jews who were imprisoned or murdered during the Holocaust. "We are all survivors today," Rabbi Josh Zlochower said.
NEWS
April 19, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
LOWER MERION Five years ago, Abri Bernstein's mother took her to see a grim documentary called The Devil Came on Horseback, about war, famine, and genocide in a remote land 6,500 miles away, the troubled Darfur region of Sudan. Bernstein was a 13-year-old seventh grader in Harrisburg at the time, but after what she saw, she said, she had to do something. "Being Jewish and having distant relatives who were killed in the Holocaust, it bothered me that genocide was happening," she recalled.
NEWS
September 6, 2013
THERE ARE a number of legitimate reasons to oppose intervention in Syria. There are many smart people, people whom I respect and with whom I share a philosophical foxhole, who lay out those reasons with eloquence and passion. *  Why now? (Why, indeed, when we did nothing in Rwanda and the Sudan?) *  Syrian President Bashar Assad is no worse than the Islamic jihadists challenging his authority. (True, even though he has bigger guns.) *  It's a civil war. Why should Americans risk our own blood and treasure to save Syrian souls?
NEWS
July 26, 2013
AS A former Philadelphian, I wanted to respond to Stephanie Farr's excellent "Where's the Fuss?" cover story: As a black male raised in the unforgiving streets of North Philly (22nd and Lehigh), I couldn't agree more. Sadly, Trayvon Martin's death, and the upheaval that followed, culminating with the acquittal of George Zimmerman, will fade in time and we will continue to have the streets of Philly and other areas of the nation littered with bodies of young black (mostly) males. We will continue to have young black (mostly)
NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Peter James Spielmann, Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS - The U.N. General Assembly overwhelmingly denounced Syria's crackdown on dissent Friday in a symbolic effort meant to push the deadlocked Security Council and the world at large into action on stopping the country's civil war. Before the vote, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon reminded the Assembly of the fresh violence in the city of Aleppo and drew comparisons between the failure to act in Syria with the international community's failure...
NEWS
July 4, 2012 | By Jacqueline Murekatete
The Fourth of July is a day of mixed emotions for me as a Rwandan American. Not only is it Independence Day in this country, but it's Liberation Day in Rwanda: a time to remember our liberation from the abyss of mass murder, and the conclusion of 100 days of mourning for the more than one million innocent men, women, and children murdered during the 1994 genocide. While others around me revel in parades and barbecues, I will celebrate my independence and liberation. But I'll also be thinking of my relatives — my beloved parents and six brothers and sisters — and others who were mercilessly killed, who never had the opportunity to enjoy the true meaning of freedom.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Mike Corder, Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - The Yugoslav war-crimes tribunal acquitted former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic of one charge of genocide Thursday but upheld 10 other counts related to atrocities in Bosnia's bloody war. While the decision was a setback for prosecutors and angered survivors in Bosnia, the 10 pending charges against Karadzic include another genocide count covering his alleged involvement in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre of 8,000...
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Mike Corder, Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Netherlands - He's no longer the swaggering general who held Sarajevo "in the palm of his hand" during Bosnia's 1992-95 war. Yet as his long-awaited genocide trial began Wednesday, Ratko Mladic still managed to reopen old wounds with the flick of his hand. Hobbled by strokes and wearing a business suit instead of combat fatigues, the frail, 70-year-old defendant had an angry exchange of hand gestures with the families of massacre victims in the public gallery, separated by the bulletproof glass in the courtroom.
NEWS
January 24, 2012
U.S. soldier faces court-martial KABUL, Afghanistan - An investigative hearing has recommended that an American soldier be court-martialed over hazing that allegedly led to a fellow infantryman's suicide in Afghanistan, but dismissed the most serious charge against him, the U.S. military said Monday. Spc. Ryan Offutt is one of eight soldiers charged in the death of Pvt. Danny Chen, 19, who shot himself Oct. 3 after what investigators say were weeks of physical abuse, humiliation, and racial slurs.
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