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Gentrification

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NEWS
March 8, 1988 | By KATHY SHEEHAN, Daily News Staff Writer
When police at a substation in Spring Garden began organizing block captains last year, they were surprised to find that Hispanics and the so- called yuppies of the changing neighborhood wanted to hold separate meetings. "They thought they didn't have common concerns," said Lt. John Downs, even though both cultural factions are opposed to drug dealing, auto theft, abandoned housing, poorly kept public housing and illegal trash dumping. Downs believes the residents' perceptions of each other may have changed slightly since then.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the cold logic of urban evolution, can gourmet restaurants and art galleries rout crack? That's the six-figure issue for residents of Spring Garden, a gentrifying neighborhood of stately trees and grand six-figure Victorian homes - but also a neighborhood with a flourishing crack trade on its streets. It was just four years ago that one of the leaders in the gentrification movement predicted that simple economics guaranteed change for the rectangular neighborhood northwest of Center City.
NEWS
September 11, 1989 | By ROBERT A. BEAUREGARD
Has gentrification in the 1980s replaced Urban Renewal as the enemy of low- income neighborhoods? Should we villify gentrifiers, or shower them with praises? Offer them our assistance, or block their path? How we answer those questions depends not only upon what we mean by gentrification and what we understand about how it actually works, but also upon a recognition of the way in which attitudes toward gentrification in Philadelphia are entwined with property-tax issues. Thus, we must also consider the effects of the recent six-year property-tax equalization program.
NEWS
March 4, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
PEOPLE FROM all over Philadelphia came together Saturday to tell their stories about gentrification at the Church of the Advocate in North Philadelphia. Organizers had issued fliers calling for an "emergency town hall" to confront a "crisis facing black Philadelphia: the demise of our neighborhoods. " In gentrification, some neighborhoods are targeted for revitalization - but the new development leads to huge rent or property-tax increases that often force longtime residents out. Sister Empress Phile, one of the organizers, said the group will host more town halls and ask for more public meetings, including congressional hearings.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
UP AND DOWN the 1500 block of North Dover Street, handwritten notes on yellow legal-size sheets of paper were tucked inside the storm doors of every house. "My name is Danielle . . . My husband is Kyle," the notes began. "We would like to buy your house. Please call or text me at (516) . . . " It then gives a number for the couple in Long Island, N.Y. Miss D, who lives in the middle of this tidy block of brick rowhouses - just east of 29th Street between Jefferson and Oxford - shows the note at her front door.
NEWS
December 14, 1986 | By Vanessa Williams, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the surface, there is nothing extraordinary about the two-story house that Michael Jones bought and helped rebuild in North Camden, a decayed neighborhood tucked beneath the Ben Franklin Bridge. But the red brick structure, which took about six months and $25,000 to rehabilitate, represents more than one man's desire to have a place of his own. It is part of a pioneering effort by residents in his neighborhood to ensure that poor and working-class people can stay if legions of more affluent gentrifiers are to discover North Camden as they have done in formerly declining sections of Philadelphia.
NEWS
December 10, 1987 | By CHARLES L. DUNCAN JR
On Monday, Philadelphia will hold a special sheriff's sale exposing over 900 properties to sale. The black community should show some concern about because 827 of the properties that are exposed to this sale are located in the black community. This is the third special sheriff sale of its kind within the last two years. These are issues which should be addressed by the black community: Exactly how many properties in the black community is the city planning to expose to sheriff sale for non-payment of taxes and water rents?
NEWS
August 15, 2006 | Linda D. Bryant
Re: "Eminent domain turned on its ear in Brewerytown," Aug. 10: As a resident of the Brewerytown section of North Philadelphia, kudos to Al Alston for saving a property at 31st and Master Streets from being taken over by the Westrum Development Co., and preventing the total gentrification of the neighborhood. I have attended several community meetings, and it always seemed as though Alston was and is the only person sincerely concerned with maintaining the flavor of the Brewerytown section and not letting long-time residents be displaced or forced out by Westrum.
NEWS
June 18, 1988 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twenty years ago, Robert Thomason took to heart the conclusion of the Kerner Commission: America was two societies - one black and poor, one white and rich. He didn't want to see that kind of polarization in his neighborhood in New York, a lively place where blacks and whites, Jews and Catholics lived together in peace. So he enlisted the help of five local churches, started a neighborhood association and set about to "build a stable, interracial neighborhood. " Today, the brownstone and limestone houses that sold for $20,000 in 1968 are going for $350,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
In most Philadelphia neighborhoods, two recent zoning cases would have been treated as routine proposals. One called for 22 rowhouses to rise from the rubble of a crumbling factory. The other sought permission to turn a trash-strewn lot into a summertime beer garden. But in Point Breeze, a zoning case is never just about zoning. And so the two proposals followed the usual script. There were angry meetings where the projects were denounced as accelerators of gentrification, and their developers vilified for "not giving back" to the community.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 30, 2016 | By Solomon Jones, For the Daily News
THE CITY of Philadelphia's 10-year tax abatement on new construction has led to the gentrification of Philadelphia's most vulnerable communities. By giving huge breaks to those who build or refurbish housing, the tax abatement has increased property values in some of our poorest neighborhoods. Along the way, it has pushed out poor tenants through higher rents, and forced out impoverished homeowners through higher property taxes. And because 55 percent of Philadelphia property taxes go to schools, the tax abatement has also denied much-needed funding to a financially strapped School District filled with children of color.
NEWS
March 17, 2016
ISSUE | SENIOR CITIZENS Longtime homeowners need city's help As a proud resident of City Councilman Kenyatta Johnson's Second District, one of the most rapidly gentrifying areas in Philadelphia, I delight every day in the new, charming restaurants and shops; our city is simply thriving. However, as a lawyer at SeniorLaw Center, a nonprofit organization serving low-income senior citizens in Philadelphia ( www.seniorlawcenter.org ), I witness daily the negative effects of gentrification ("Help keep longtime Phila.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2016
One by one, the totems of poverty that once dotted Philadelphia's urban landscape have been disappearing. Since the late '90s, the Philadelphia Housing Authority has imploded 23 public housing towers and replaced them with traditional rowhouses. On March 19, two more of those alien towers, the Norman Blumberg Apartments, will be reduced to dust in the North Philadelphia neighborhood the PHA has dubbed Sharswood. This time, however, the housing authority's ambitions are much bigger than usual.
REAL_ESTATE
December 6, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A thousand years ago, 1978 to be exact, I traded a suburban apartment complex we called "Plywood Village" for a first-floor apartment in a rehabbed 19th-century hotel in Hartford, Conn., a few blocks from the state Capitol. I'm not sure who had been living in the Hotel Capitol before the rehab, but they likely were not well-to-do. I later completed a demographic study of the building on the way to a doctorate in history I was working toward but didn't finish because I moved to Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
In most Philadelphia neighborhoods, two recent zoning cases would have been treated as routine proposals. One called for 22 rowhouses to rise from the rubble of a crumbling factory. The other sought permission to turn a trash-strewn lot into a summertime beer garden. But in Point Breeze, a zoning case is never just about zoning. And so the two proposals followed the usual script. There were angry meetings where the projects were denounced as accelerators of gentrification, and their developers vilified for "not giving back" to the community.
REAL_ESTATE
July 6, 2015 | By Paul Jablow, For The Inquirer
There may be no way to hold back the tide of gentrification in such neighborhoods as Fishtown, but Sandy Salzman is trying to find ways to keep it from washing away moderate-income residents. Salzman is executive director of New Kensington Community Development Corp., and the Awesometown townhouse project is its first foray into mixed affordable housing: 10 units selling at the market rate of about $400,000, and four subsidized by NKCDC to sell for half that, with the "winners" picked by lottery.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
As neighbors filled the church pews and lined the aisles, they were warned: Don't talk about your property taxes tonight. But some feared the project on the table - 22 single-family houses spanning half a block of Point Breeze - would price them out of their homes. And the man at the front of the room, developer-turned-candidate Ori Feibush, seemed to only add to the anxiety. In minutes, people were shouting over the pews. "I would love change. But we want affordable change," a woman yelled into the microphone as others waited to speak.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
At Front and Tasker sits the garage of Billy Ski and Fred O'Rourke. Lifelong friends, they are a couple of roofers in their 50s who spend most of their free time in the garage with a pit mix named Widdy - "like the dartboard," Billy explained - fixing up their antique cars. Like Billy's beautiful 1963 candy-apple Chevy Nova. If gentrification abounds in the neighborhood in the form of pricey new townhouses, it ends at Billy and Fred's metal gate. The garage is private. Strictly friends and family.
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
UP AND DOWN the 1500 block of North Dover Street, handwritten notes on yellow legal-size sheets of paper were tucked inside the storm doors of every house. "My name is Danielle . . . My husband is Kyle," the notes began. "We would like to buy your house. Please call or text me at (516) . . . " It then gives a number for the couple in Long Island, N.Y. Miss D, who lives in the middle of this tidy block of brick rowhouses - just east of 29th Street between Jefferson and Oxford - shows the note at her front door.
NEWS
October 27, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Point Drive at the tip of Longport, where houses were cracked open two years ago by Hurricane Sandy's waves and wind, their multimillion-dollar vulnerability bared to the sea, all is as it was. The Hankins finished a total rebuild. The Tuchmans debated selling, but decided to do the repairs and keep their summer home after all. Marvin Ashner, who never left, not even during the storm, still answers his door beneath whimsical Blues Brothers statues. "Everybody's back," said Steven Hankin, an Atlantic City lawyer who lives on Point Drive, which overlooks the inlet's washing machine currents.
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