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NEWS
November 9, 1991 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Fashion Writer
At last, some designers who know how to mix it up right. Responsible for this delightful brew yesterday and Thursday were Donna Karan, Geoffrey Beene, Bob Mackie, Isaac Mizrahi and Louis Dell'Olio, designer for the Anne Klein label. Just name your potion. Karan offered vanilla, as well as midnight blue and steel-gray for her tastefully understated suits, backless jacket dresses and bias-cut skirts. Fabrics were crepe, chiffon, rayon and silk. The crowds cheered her fluid creations of man-tailored slacks and jackets and her lady-like touches, such as pearl buttons in gold settings, lace bustiers and hemlines trimmed in lace.
NEWS
October 15, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON TARVER
A model wearing vintage Geoffrey Beene clothes walks down the central staircase at the Art Museum during a preview gala for the exhibit "Best Dressed: 250 Years of Style. " Beene was among the many famous designers who attended the gala last night. The exhibit celebrating fashion will include more than 200 objects from North America, Europe, Asia and Africa. It opens on Oct. 21 and will run through Jan. 4.
LIVING
January 19, 1986 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Remember the dress? You know, that little one-piece number that was a wardrobe staple in the '50s and '60s until casual separates came on the scene? Well, it's back with a sonic boom. Actually, dresses have been quietly edging back into fashion's mainstream for the last few seasons. Three years ago, the chemise was given the kiss of chic by Yves Saint Laurent, Geoffrey Beene, Bill Blass and numerous other designers both here and abroad. This straight, unbelted shift, introduced in 1957 by the late Cristobal Balenciaga, was not only comfortable, it was the ideal camouflage for less than perfect figures.
NEWS
April 16, 1988 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two hectic weeks of fall fashion shows ended here yesterday on a calm and elegant note with the collections of Donna Karan and Geoffrey Beene. The wacky, where-do-you-wear-it? styles of past seasons have happily vanished, replaced by quiet, grown-up clothes that are firmly rooted in the '80s. Forget soft, puffy little-girl clothes; the slim, tailored adult silhouette is back. Pants were by far the winners, followed by short, snug jackets, textured wool - boucle, mohair - and high-voltage colors like fuchsia and acid green.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In closing the Seventh Avenue collections yesterday, Geoffrey Beene and Donna Karan put their elegant seals of approval on the prevailing themes for fall: short and sweet, brown and gray, opulence without adornment. But it was Isaac Mizrahi, that rebel with a cause, who stepped away from the pack with a collection that sizzled in pastels and unusual shapes. Mizrahi's show on Thursday began nearly an hour late, but the 1,000 or so guests in the SoHo loft forgot their long wait as the clothes wowed them.
NEWS
April 15, 1989 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Geoffrey Beene and Donna Karan usually can be counted on to conclude the Seventh Avenue shows on a high note, and yesterday they did just that. Their back-to-back collections were tours de force of modern, streamlined design executed in soft, sumptuous fabrics. On Thursday night, Isaac Mizrahi, Seventh Avenue's hot young talent, also won praise for an offbeat, sophisticated collection that featured such novel ideas as a sexy, strapless, tartan-kilt gown. The three diverse shows infused some fizz and zip into a week of quiet, low-key collections in which designers emphasized classics rather than striking out in new directions.
NEWS
October 30, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas Neil Crater, 67, who in the 1970s and early 1980s dictated what high-society women would wear each season, died Sunday of coronary heart disease at Manor Care Mercy, a nursing home in Yeadon. He lived in Center City until three months ago. As fashion director at John Wanamaker during the 1970s, Mr. Crater brought the seasons' haute couture to Philadelphia society from New York and Europe. He selected the clothing and accessories carried by Wanamakers, advised well-heeled clients, and rubbed elbows with top designers including Bill Blass and Geoffrey Beene.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1986 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four designers led fashion on a merry chase - from Central Park South to the East Village to Fifth Avenue to the garment center - at the New York fall collections that ended yesterday. If the locations were diverse, the clothes were no less so, ranging from Carolyne Roehm's jewel-and-fur-trimmed ball gowns to David Cameron's rubberized wet suits and silly '60s sportswear that is all the rage with New York trendoids. Geoffrey Beene distinguished himself with the season's most inventive couture-quality collection, while Donna Karan, Seventh Avenue's reigning princess, scored a success with sleek, sexy, effortless clothes geared for the executive woman.
NEWS
April 13, 1987 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
The final ballots of the American fall collections were cast Friday, with designers giving the vote to short, streamlined clothes that are slender and curvy and offer no camouflage to sags and bulges. "Can't the designers sell Paulina's body along with the clothes?" a fashion editor asked wistfully as she watched the top model pose in Donna Karan's clingy strapless cashmere jumpsuit. To be sure, each designer has interpreted the current "look" according to his or her own lexicon, and some Seventh Avenue masters have succeeded far better than others.
NEWS
November 5, 1988 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Geoffrey Beene, who was recently honored with a 25-year retrospective, and Isaac Mizrahi, who is all of 26 years old, provided a sensational finale to a week of rather feeble spring collections that ended here yesterday. Unlike many of their colleagues, whose collections were derivative and lacking in creative spark, Beene and Mizrahi dazzled their audiences with imaginative, beautifully executed clothes that owed no debts to past designers and past eras. Rather than recycling fashion, they are creating it and leading American design into the '90s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The metallic Geoffrey Beene mini in the Philadelphia Museum of Art's exhibit "Silver and Gold Fashions Since 1960" is the sartorial standout of this glitzy gallery show. The dress is just beautiful: Beene scattered shiny hot-pink, orange, and green blossoms throughout its bodice, and he planted a garden of the neon blooms along the collar and hemline. "The year was 1967, and Beene had declared the ball gown passé," said Kristina Haugland, who plucked all of the show's shiny showstoppers from the museum's 30,000-piece costume collection.
NEWS
October 30, 2004 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas Neil Crater, 67, who in the 1970s and early 1980s dictated what high-society women would wear each season, died Sunday of coronary heart disease at Manor Care Mercy, a nursing home in Yeadon. He lived in Center City until three months ago. As fashion director at John Wanamaker during the 1970s, Mr. Crater brought the seasons' haute couture to Philadelphia society from New York and Europe. He selected the clothing and accessories carried by Wanamakers, advised well-heeled clients, and rubbed elbows with top designers including Bill Blass and Geoffrey Beene.
NEWS
September 30, 2004 | By Elizabeth Wellington INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Geoffrey Beene was so much more than Van Heusen tailored men's shirts and Grey Flannel cologne. The 77-year-old New York designer, who died of pneumonia Tuesday afternoon, was a trailblazer who regularly broke fashion's rules. A student of French couture, Beene - along with James Galanos, Norman Norell and Bill Blass - forced Europeans to respect American fashion. In the snooty world of one-of-a-kind garments, that was no easy feat. The Louisiana-born designer won over his patrons (Jacqueline Onassis, Nancy Reagan, Pat Nixon, and Glenn Close among them)
LIVING
April 26, 2002 | By Kathleen Nicholson Webber FOR THE INQUIRER
Sounding a bit like Dorothy speaking to Toto, Philadelphia University Dean David Brookstein told a well-heeled crowd at the Academy of Music, "We're not in the gym anymore. " But no one needed reminding, as the school's end-of-the-year fashion show moved off campus for the first time Wednesday night into the velvet and crystal of the legendary concert hall. The Spirit of Design Award was another first for the night. To be given each year to the designer in any discipline whose industry contributions are significant and enduring, this year's award went to fashion designer Geoffrey Beene.
NEWS
April 24, 2002 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
Big-name designers and future-forward fashion are what you would expect from couturiers in Milan, Paris and London. But they also can be found at the senior student shows of this area's three major schools of fashion design - Philadelphia University, Moore College of Art and Design, and Drexel University. Philadelphia University offers the first of the shows tonight, presenting creations of wearable art at the Academy of Music and honoring modernist fashion icon Geoffrey Beene with its Spirit of Design Award.
NEWS
October 15, 1997 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON TARVER
A model wearing vintage Geoffrey Beene clothes walks down the central staircase at the Art Museum during a preview gala for the exhibit "Best Dressed: 250 Years of Style. " Beene was among the many famous designers who attended the gala last night. The exhibit celebrating fashion will include more than 200 objects from North America, Europe, Asia and Africa. It opens on Oct. 21 and will run through Jan. 4.
LIVING
November 2, 1994 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Remember gabardine pantsuits from the 1970s? Or those shiny polyester disco dresses from the Saturday Night Fever era? How about tight satin duds made for those who liked to boogie? Do you still have some of those old threads in storage? Well, get ready to dust them off and shake out the mothballs. It's retro time again in the fashion world. Believe it or not, many U.S. designers are reworking styles from the disco days. If you'll recall, it was just last year that designers revisited flower power and other themes from the hippie/free-love segment of the late '60s.
NEWS
April 11, 1992 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
Amid all the hype and hysteria in the fashion industry, amid the thousands of ensembles seen on the runways each fall and spring, occasionally lightning strikes, a brilliant flash that proves clothes still have the power to seduce the spirit and absorb the mind. It is in these instances that one understands why so many worship at the temple of high fashion. In the closing days of the fall collections here, three of the country's foremost designers presented flawless fashions that enhanced the feminine form.
NEWS
November 9, 1991 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Fashion Writer
At last, some designers who know how to mix it up right. Responsible for this delightful brew yesterday and Thursday were Donna Karan, Geoffrey Beene, Bob Mackie, Isaac Mizrahi and Louis Dell'Olio, designer for the Anne Klein label. Just name your potion. Karan offered vanilla, as well as midnight blue and steel-gray for her tastefully understated suits, backless jacket dresses and bias-cut skirts. Fabrics were crepe, chiffon, rayon and silk. The crowds cheered her fluid creations of man-tailored slacks and jackets and her lady-like touches, such as pearl buttons in gold settings, lace bustiers and hemlines trimmed in lace.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | By Roy H. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
In closing the Seventh Avenue collections yesterday, Geoffrey Beene and Donna Karan put their elegant seals of approval on the prevailing themes for fall: short and sweet, brown and gray, opulence without adornment. But it was Isaac Mizrahi, that rebel with a cause, who stepped away from the pack with a collection that sizzled in pastels and unusual shapes. Mizrahi's show on Thursday began nearly an hour late, but the 1,000 or so guests in the SoHo loft forgot their long wait as the clothes wowed them.
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