CollectionsGeography
IN THE NEWS

Geography

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 30, 1993 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Educational Foundation of Chester County is looking for a few good geography projects. For funding, that is. The foundation recently was awarded an $8,000 Pennsylvania Legislative Initiatives Grant through State Sen. Earl Baker to enhance the teaching of geography in the county's public schools. According to director Sandra Moser, the foundation is looking to finance projects that teach students about other cultures, life in foreign lands, international trade, foreign economic systems, environmental issues in foreign countries, and multi-ethnic topics.
NEWS
August 6, 1989 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under ordinary circumstances, the blue paint is used for parking spaces for the handicapped, and the yellow and white are painted down the center of township streets or highways. But on the blacktop at the playground adjacent to the Thomas Fitzwater Elementary School in Upper Dublin, the thick and sturdy road paints compose the colors of California, Texas, Pennsylvania, Florida and most of the other states on an unusual map. "Instead of the traffic of cars, it will have the traffic of lots of little feet," said Meg Class, 37, who has two children attending the Fitzwater School.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | BY JACK KIRKWOOD
Rrring! Rrring! "Hello. " "Hi, Mom. Did you hear about the earthquake in San Francisco?" my sister asked. "Oh, my God, no," responded my mother, "good thing Jack is in California. " That's a fairly accurate recounting of an Oct. 17 telephone conversation at 8:05 p.m. (EST). Mom's geography awareness has obviously slipped since my childhood. Funny that, because Mom helped my sisters and me discover the educational fun of geography in car trips as children. For me, you might sing: "On the way to Cape May I learned geography.
NEWS
July 20, 2011 | By Tara Malone, Chicago Tribune
CHICAGO - Ask a group of 12th graders how the Great Lakes formed, and only about half can pinpoint the primary cause: glaciations. Quiz eighth-grade students about the geography of the Southwest, and a third identify the arid conditions that make water a scarce public resource. Such responses to a national exam released Tuesday reveal the tenuous command that many U.S. schoolchildren have on basic geography, including knowledge of the natural environment, how it shapes society and other cultures and countries.
NEWS
September 2, 1988 | By Beatrice Sarlos
First came the complaint that Johnny and Jane can't read. They tested some more and determined they can't spell or compute, either. Now, half a decade after the National Commission on Excellence in Education warned of the "rising tide of mediocrity" in American education, we learn that too many Americans are geographically illiterate. According to a recent survey commissioned by the National Geographic Society, the United States places in the bottom third of the world's industrialized nations in knowledge about other places and people.
NEWS
October 31, 2006
MARK ALAN Hughes' spirited op-ed defense of Philadelphia's honor against the silly depredations of Julia Vitullo-Martin requires a couple of clarifications. The Erie Canal, completed in 1825, is not the "economic and geographic explanation of how New York City replaced Philadelphia as the nation's economic capital in the beginning of the 19th century. " New York passed Philadelphia as the most populous American city around 1807, before anyone had even proposed a canal to Lake Erie.
NEWS
September 21, 1986 | By Calvin Trillin
I've done everything to avoid facing up to the geography crisis. It's not that I haven't seen the evidence. Every week I seem to read about the results of yet another study confirming a shocking level of geographical ninnyism among the young. Apparently, if you asked the average American high school student where, say, Alabama is, he might identify it as the capital of Chicago, which he thinks of as a large country somewhere in the Middle East. A high school student who lives in Montgomery or Birmingham or Huntsville wouldn't say that about Alabama, of course; he'd say it was a football team.
NEWS
April 1, 1986 | BY CAL THOMAS
Of all the arguments used against President Reagan's request for $100 million in aid to the Nicaraguan rebels, probably the silliest was that "most people don't know where Nicaragua is. " This might have evoked an impassioned response from schoolteachers, had they not been busy taking competency tests. Maybe the critics of the president's aid request are right. A survey by a University of Miami geography professor two years ago found that 42 percent of students surveyed thought the Falkland Islands were off the coast of England.
NEWS
October 23, 1998
The process now under way in Spain regarding the crimes of the Chilean and Argentine dictators suggests a change in the paradigm of the judicial treatment of crimes against humanity. . . . Now is the moment to put a true period to the strategy of indifference toward the most horrible crimes that have ever prevailed, to affirm with deeds that in the future there will be no more zones without rights, no more borders in the geography of human rights, no more paradises of impunity for violators bearing any resemblance to these men. - Perfecto Andres Ibanez El Pais (Madrid)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
August 11, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stephen Klasko is the new president and CEO of Thomas Jefferson University and the Jefferson Health System. A fan of Star Trek , he wants to push Jefferson forward into the next century - steering away from health care's traditional model of big-edifice hospitals and real estate and instead toward localized medical offices. Jefferson's new offices in Fairmount will aim to do just that. The health-care giant will lease 12,000 square feet at developer Neal Rodin's new project, Rodin Square, putting Jefferson doctors in the same building as apartment dwellers.
NEWS
July 5, 2014
ISSUE | STAYING SAFE Leave it to the pros The increase in fireworks-related injuries is easily explained, and I speak from experience as a commander for nine years of the Police Department bomb squad ("Fireworks-related injuries zoomed last year," July 2). Laws regarding who can purchase and use fireworks in Pennsylvania are as murky as the Schuylkill, making fireworks too accessible. That often puts them in the hands of individuals who have been drinking. Most disturbing, some adults allow children to use fireworks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
When I opened The Geography of Memory (Center/Hachette, 320 pages, $22), by Jeanne Murray Walker, I expected beautiful writing. After all, she is a local poet and playwright whose work I knew and admired. I knew the book was a memoir of her care for her mother, Erna Murray Kelley, through the frustrations and losses of Alzheimer's disease. Erna started to show symptoms in the late 1990s ("but the thing is, you don't know what it is at first," says Jeanne by phone). By 2000, it became clear she would have to move from her apartment into assisted living.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2013 | By Karla Klein Albertson, For The Inquirer
In 18th-century Philadelphia, a map in your hand would have been the high-tech GPS that answered all your questions. Not just for sailors and surveyors, maps gave young students and their parents a window on the larger world. "Common Destinations: Maps in the American Experience," Winterthur's exhibition through Jan. 5, puts on display more than 100 rarely seen items dating from the 1750s to the 1870s. In addition to traditional maps and globes, there are ceramics, playing cards, puzzles, and powder horns decorated with cartographic designs.
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
ATLANTA - If you're 65 and living in Hawaii, here's some good news: Odds are you'll live another 21 years. And for all but five of those years, you'll likely be in pretty good health. Hawaii tops the charts in the government's first state-by-state look at how long Americans age 65 can expect to live, on average, and how many of the remaining years will be healthy ones. Retirement-age Mississippians fared worst, with about 171/2 more years remaining and nearly seven of them in poorer health.
NEWS
June 16, 2013
By Dr. Christopher C. Chang, a pediatric allergist at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital and Alfred I. du Pont Hospital for Children, in Wilmington.   Children born outside the United States have significantly lower odds of developing allergic disorders, including asthma, eczema, hay fever, and food allergies, researchers reported recently. Their study, in JAMA Pediatrics, also found that kids born outside the U.S. who have lived here longer than 10 years had significantly higher odds of developing any allergic disorders, including eczema and hay fever, than those who resided here for only 0 to 2 years.
SPORTS
January 30, 2013 | Daily News Wire Reports
THE BIG TEN might put more emphasis on geography when shuffling divisions after eastern schools Maryland and Rutgers join the Midwest-centric league by 2014. Penn State athletic director Dave Joyner said officials within the league have had several discussions over the phone about potential divisional alignments. "I have a feeling it will be more geography-based," Joyner said. "There seems to be a lot of sentiment for that. " It would be especially helpful, Joyner said, to ease travel issues and funding for travel, especially for Olympic sports.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2012 | Cheap Buzz
BUZZ: HEY, Marnie, my brother gave me a bottle of ice wine. I think it's from Alaska. Marnie: I doubt that, Buzz. Vines die if they freeze solid in winter. Wine grapes grow in "temperate" climates from 30 to 50 degrees in latitude. Buzz: OK, but if ice wine isn't from Alaska, I bet it comes from Chile. Chile, get it? Marnie: Good one. Funny you mention Chile — it stretches through all those latitudes and makes diverse wines as a result. Geography has a huge impact on wine style.
NEWS
July 20, 2011 | By Tara Malone, Chicago Tribune
CHICAGO - Ask a group of 12th graders how the Great Lakes formed, and only about half can pinpoint the primary cause: glaciations. Quiz eighth-grade students about the geography of the Southwest, and a third identify the arid conditions that make water a scarce public resource. Such responses to a national exam released Tuesday reveal the tenuous command that many U.S. schoolchildren have on basic geography, including knowledge of the natural environment, how it shapes society and other cultures and countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Erin (Drew Barrymore), an aspiring journalist, and Garrett (Justin Long), a music-industry scout, have both chemistry and physics. What they don't have much of is history or geography. Within weeks after they meet in a scruffy Manhattan tavern, Erin must return to San Francisco for graduate school. Barrymore is impish and Long droll in the affable comedy Going the Distance , about lovers divided by 3,000 miles and almost as many other obstacles. While the leads (once real-life partners)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|