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George Balanchine

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NEWS
December 23, 1992 | Inquirer photographs by Michael S. Wirtz
When "The Nutcracker" premiered on Dec. 17, 1892, in St. Petersburg, Russia, it was a bust. Critics complained about all those children running around. George Balanchine's choreography resurrected Tchaikovsky's mothballed ballet in 1954, and the Pennsylvania Ballet production follows Balanchine to the letter. There are still plenty of children, and they do lots of running around, but after 100 years, everyone is used to it. Performances at the Academy of Music will run until Jan. 3.
NEWS
October 21, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
MIRIAM GOLDEN Ziegler Hailparn, who went from Philadelphia to become a ballet star, danced in films with the likes of Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly, and founded a ballet company, died Sept. 30. She was 90 and lived in Los Angeles. Miriam, who performed under the name Miriam Golden, was the last surviving member of the original American Ballet Theatre, the first dance company to define the American style of ballet. She was born in Philadelphia to Israel Oscar Goldstein, a pharmacist, and Freda Simons Goldstein.
NEWS
February 19, 1993 | by Janet Anderson, Daily News Dance Critic
The Pennsylvania Ballet is one scrappy outfit. It has only 27 dancers on its roster right now, for perfectly admirable reasons of financial and artistic restructuring, yet it pulled off its spring season opening Wednesday with a repertory program requiring three times that number for adequate staging. It opens with George Balanchine's wonderful, wistful story ballet "La Sonnambula" (cast of 27), then segues into Christopher d'Amboise's starkly modern ballet "The Golden Mean" (cast of 12)
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | by Janet Anderson, Daily News Dance Critic
Pittsburgh Ballet Theater, with a heavy emphasis on theater, is happily ensconced at the Academy of Music through the weekend with a big, fancy production of "Midsummer Night's Dream" and a dollop of pure ballet in the form of George Balanchine's "Square Dance. " Those lucky enough to have seen Pittsburgh Ballet Theater's opening night mixed bill Wednesday will have a better idea of the range of these well- schooled dancers. For reasons that are not ours to know, only one opportunity was offered to see the company in "The Mighty Casey," a baseball frolic choreorgraphed by Lisa de Ribere; "Return to a Strange Land," an introspective modern ballet of Jiri Kylian; and the majestic "Theme and Variations" of Balanchine.
NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1961, George Balanchine summoned some of the nation's top ballet teachers to a seminar in New York, hub of the U.S. dance world and one of the few cities where professional ballet was being performed at the time. "Something has to happen," said the great choreographer and founder of the New York City Ballet and its School of American Ballet. "You're turning out more and more dancers. Where are they going to dance?" "If you really are serious, Mr. B.," said Barbara Weisberger, who had been his first child student (at age 8)
NEWS
March 26, 1991
From the start, the campaign to save the Pennsylvania Ballet struck us as the stuff of Broadway - and the weekend finale sure didn't disappoint. Right down to the wire, most of the dancers and Shubert Theater stagehands didn't know the $1 million fund-raising goal had been surpassed. They learned Saturday when they gathered backstage after the evening performance of their tribute to ballet great George Balanchine. Sweaty, exhausted and excited after a two-week high-wire act of performing without pay, the company launched into giddy celebrations of the good news that lasted well into the evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1986 | By MEREDITH M. HENRY, Special to the Daily News
The Pennsylvania Ballet opened its spring season last night at the Academy of Music with a program entitled "Balanchine Black and White. " But the five works could just as easily have been called "The Best of Balanchine. " The program, which represented some of the late choreographer's finest work, proved to be a showcase for the gifts not only of George Balanchine but of the talented company of young dancers as well. The evening began with "The Four Temperaments," which explores the range of physical and psychological aspects of the human spirit, from the melancholic to the hopeful to the apathetic to the angry.
NEWS
September 23, 1987 | By JOE O'DOWD JR., Daily News Staff Writer
Ballet is a triumph of form merging with substance. Dancers convey human emotion by the sheer power of their bodies. No words need be spoken of rage, when clenched fists and twisted torsos tell the story. The first beat of a heart in love is pared to the simplicity of a pirouette. The flush of success is transformed into a flying leap across the stage. The Pennsylvania Ballet in its first joint venture with the Milwaukee Ballet begins the 1987-88 season tonight at the Academy of Music, Broad & Locust streets.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1986 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
Storytelling is such a fundamental pleasure, it's a wonder more choreographers don't try it. On the other hand, stories are hard to tell in dance, because the medium resists literal enactment and specificity. To paraphrase George Balanchine's statement of the problem, it's impossible to show a mother-in-law in dance. In the last two years, Melanie Stewart has been tackling stories with the theme of womanhood. Last night her troupe, Melanie Stewart and Company Dance, premiered at the Annenberg Center's Prince Theater The Tiger's Bride, which is the final installment of a trilogy that began with The Rabbit's Bride and continued with Beauty and the Beast.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2010 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
Some of the best dancing happens in the studio, where dancers are free to throw themselves into the movement, take risks, make mistakes, mark some steps, and dance others full out. They can practice in a corner or study their moves in a mirror. Choreographer William Forsythe moved that scene onto the stage in 1987 with his In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated, which Pennsylvania Ballet gave its company premiere Wednesday night at the Merriam Theater. In green and black practice clothes, nine dancers performed explosive jumps, stretched legs up to their ears, danced small combinations, and turned in many different positions to a storm of crashes, industrial music, and sounds by Thom Willems.
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NEWS
October 15, 2013 | By Ellen Dunkel, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1961, George Balanchine summoned some of the nation's top ballet teachers to a seminar in New York, hub of the U.S. dance world and one of the few cities where professional ballet was being performed at the time. "Something has to happen," said the great choreographer and founder of the New York City Ballet and its School of American Ballet. "You're turning out more and more dancers. Where are they going to dance?" "If you really are serious, Mr. B.," said Barbara Weisberger, who had been his first child student (at age 8)
NEWS
April 14, 2013 | By Caryn Rousseau, Associated Press
CHICAGO - Maria Tallchief, 88, one of America's first great prima ballerinas who gave life to such works as The Nutcracker , Firebird , and other masterpieces from legendary choreographer George Balanchine, died Thursday in Chicago, her daughter Elise Paschen said Friday. Ms. Tallchief danced with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo from 1942 to 1947, but her career was most associated with the New York City Ballet, where she worked from 1948 to 1965. Balanchine, the Russian-born dance genius, was not only the company's director; in 1946, he became Ms. Tallchief's husband for some years.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
In the early aughts, nervous dance companies were looking over their shoulders at the gathering holiday-time competition. As inhabitants of that lucrative calendar slot, productions of The Nutcracker had long been cash cows. But with Disneys on Ice and Christmas-theme theater productions multiplying, it looked as if Nutcracker revenue might take a hit. It hasn't turned out that way, at least locally. Pennsylvania Ballet's production of the Tchaikovsky/Balanchine ballet closed Dec. 31, earning about as much as it did last year.
NEWS
January 15, 2012 | Reviewed by Lewis Whittington
Joan Myers Brown & the Audacious Hope of the Black Ballerina A Biohistory of American Performance By Brenda Dixon Gottschild Palgrave Macmillan. 370 pp. $27 This is a Philadelphia story that rivals Rocky in blood, sweat, and tears, not to mention fabulous footwork. Joan Myers Brown & the Audacious Hope for the Black Ballerina is, of course, about the visionary founder and artistic director of Philadanco, the internationally renowned dance troupe that is still going strong after 40 years and that embodies the spirit of Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 10, 2011
HERE'S what will make news in Philadelphia this week: CITY HALL Extend teen curfew? Do you know where your kids are? If not, it could cost you. On Wednesday, City Council will begin hearings on a bill to stiffen the curfew for teens and increase fines on parents whose kids violate the curfew. Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown introduced the bill on behalf of the Nutter administration, in response to a series of violent attacks by teen mobs last summer. * The curfew would be 8 p.m. for children 13 and younger, 9 p.m. for those ages 14 and 15, and 10 p.m. for those 16 and 17. The curfew would be an hour later during the summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2011 | By Lisa Kraus, For The Inquirer
Satisfaction comes early in Pennsylvania Ballet's "Building on Balanchine" program, seen at Thursday's opening. First up, Agon (1957) is a paragon of classy midcentury modernism. George Balanchine had serious fun collaborating with Igor Stravinsky on 12 sections of a dance for 12 dancers. He deployed all permutations of his cast to Stravinsky's 12-tone-inflected score. Black and white costumes modeled on practice clothes reveal each nuance of Mr. B's play with movement. He punctuates with flexed feet and wrists, rolling shoulders, and hip swivels.
NEWS
October 21, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
MIRIAM GOLDEN Ziegler Hailparn, who went from Philadelphia to become a ballet star, danced in films with the likes of Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly, and founded a ballet company, died Sept. 30. She was 90 and lived in Los Angeles. Miriam, who performed under the name Miriam Golden, was the last surviving member of the original American Ballet Theatre, the first dance company to define the American style of ballet. She was born in Philadelphia to Israel Oscar Goldstein, a pharmacist, and Freda Simons Goldstein.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2010 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
Some of the best dancing happens in the studio, where dancers are free to throw themselves into the movement, take risks, make mistakes, mark some steps, and dance others full out. They can practice in a corner or study their moves in a mirror. Choreographer William Forsythe moved that scene onto the stage in 1987 with his In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated, which Pennsylvania Ballet gave its company premiere Wednesday night at the Merriam Theater. In green and black practice clothes, nine dancers performed explosive jumps, stretched legs up to their ears, danced small combinations, and turned in many different positions to a storm of crashes, industrial music, and sounds by Thom Willems.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2006 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
For 38 holiday seasons, audiences have thrilled to Pennsylvania Ballet's glorious production of "The Nutcracker. " With soaring music by Tchaikovsky and superb dancing to brilliant George Balanchine choreography, enhanced by the company's elegant sets and costumes, it's one of our city's treasures. Though many people make "Nutcracker" an annual visit, first-timers are always astonished by the skill of the many children in the cast. This year, 200 kids auditioned for 120 roles, and the lucky ones began rehearsing six weeks ago under the direction of Christine Cox. Cox, who retired in June after 13 seasons, shouldered this responsibility for the last six years while also dancing in the production.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2006 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
As a young Israeli growing up in Tel Aviv, Ronen Koresh knew that he wanted not only to be a dancer but to have his own dance company. His wish was fulfilled in 1991, though financial solvency has been a constant struggle. His nine-member Koresh Dance Company will perform three works this weekend in a show called "Le Bal Noir," the title of one of these works, by New York choreographer Donald Byrd. Koresh, known as Roni, created the other two pieces: "Standing in Tears" and "Looking Back: The Music of the '40s and '50s.
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