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George Carlin

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NEWS
June 24, 2008
"I love words. Thank you for hearing my words. " That's how comedian George Carlin, who died Sunday at 71, began his best-known monologue, "Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television," which was recorded on his 1972 album Class Clown. It would take more than seven words to sum up his long, funny, brilliant career. But when Carlin is mentioned, those seven words will be, too. You still can't say them on broadcast TV, or print them in most newspapers. But Carlin said them - to poke fun at authority, to talk dirty, and to stretch the ears and minds of his helplessly laughing listeners.
NEWS
November 29, 2007 | By Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Carlin doesn't expect much. Not from the human race, which he views pretty much as a failure, and not from the universe, which he views pretty much as a cosmic joke. But he does expect to draw laughs, which he pretty much considers his art. This, after all, is the guy Comedy Central designated the second best stand-up comic of all time. (A "dubious" honor, he says, "but it's always nice to be high up on the dubious list. ") He mines his material from a bleak vein - his last HBO special included a segment on an all-suicide TV channel - and salts it with profanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1997 | By Carlin Romano By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the introduction to his new book, Brain Droppings, George Carlin tells us how angry he is, how he can't stand this planet, how he thinks humans have messed it all up. "I'm happy to tell you that there's little in this world that I believe in," he writes in earthy prose. "I frankly don't give a . . . how it all turns out in this country - or anywhere else, for that matter. I think the human game was up a long time ago . . . and we're now just playing out the string. " Not real optimistic, are we, George?
NEWS
June 28, 2008
GEORGE Carlin's skeptics are probably ridiculing his passing by believing Carlin didn't make it into heaven because of his questioning of religious hypocrisy. Carlin wouldn't care because he saw heaven as an ambiguous word - just like so many others. He thought outside the box. He didn't let others define him - he let his life experience become his truth. He overcame a lot of adversity, which is probably the reason he was so brutally honest. George Carlin used strong language, but he was never intolerant, inconsiderate or racist - characteristics his critics sometimes display.
NEWS
April 17, 2002
ONCE AGAIN, FBI glory hounds show how inept they are, endangering the citizens of Philadelphia. Did they notify local authorities about their proposed actions? Why did they hire private tow companies to do police work? Whenever the FBI or most other federal agencies try to do real police work, they screw it up. Often, police officers do all the work for major arrests and the FBI takes the credit and glory. I'm sure the men and women of the FBI feel superior because of their credentials.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1987 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Back in the early 1970s, when George Carlin sported a ponytail and wore T- shirts on stage, he won notoriety by talking about the "seven dirty words" - the ones you would never hear on radio or television. And when a radio station played a monologue containing the words, it got into hot water with the Federal Communications Commission. Things have changed over the years, although the FCC recently put the squeeze on the raunchy chatter of such broadcasting personalities as Howard Stern.
NEWS
July 22, 2011
By Joyce Eisenberg and Ellen Scolnic The F word used to get you a ticket to detention. Now it's a ticket to fame and fortune. Consider the "children's book for adults" Go the F- to Sleep and Gordon Ramsay's cooking show, The F Word . We have our own F word - three of them, in fact. We're talking about farchadat , farblondzhet , and farmisht - Yiddish adjectives that describe us these days. We're confused, distracted, and forgetful. We're women of a certain age. Need some examples?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2011 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
Wilfred is a comedy about a dog named Wilfred and his neurotic neighbor who (along with all the viewers) sees Wilfred as a man in a dog suit. It's a really terrible dog suit. I'm trying to be straightforward here because the show, premiering Thursday at 10 p.m. on the FX cable network, is so twisted. It's crude and hilarious and clearly aimed at a young male audience. Wilfred pants after his tennis ball, thrown over a high fence. TV executives think the young male audience is just as desirable and hard to find.
NEWS
August 7, 2012 | by Burton Caine
The Supreme Court let us down again by deciding recently in Fox TV v. FCC that it will not decide whether censoring speech on public airways is unconstitutional. Thirty-four years ago, the court ruled that the Federal Communications Commission could punish broadcasters on the public airways for speech that is "indecent" — but not obscene. That case involved George Carlin's popular monologue of seven words that you could never say on radio and television. His point was the hypocrisy of the government in banning some expressions and not others that may have included the same words, but used in a way that sex could be implied.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
The first thing I'll say about Adrienne Truscott's Asking for It is that it's smart. Her one-woman stand-up presented by Simpatico Theatre Project asks hard, sometimes humorous questions about the use of rape jokes in comedy and deals with them in a sly, sophisticated manner. I'll start with her shtick - and no, I'm not referring to Truscott's performing most of her 75-minute show naked from the waist down. During the show, the New York-based choreographer-turned-comedian wears a big blond wig, oversize bra, and midwaist jean jacket.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
The first thing I'll say about Adrienne Truscott's Asking for It is that it's smart. Her one-woman stand-up presented by Simpatico Theatre Project asks hard, sometimes humorous questions about the use of rape jokes in comedy and deals with them in a sly, sophisticated manner. I'll start with her shtick - and no, I'm not referring to Truscott's performing most of her 75-minute show naked from the waist down. During the show, the New York-based choreographer-turned-comedian wears a big blond wig, oversize bra, and midwaist jean jacket.
NEWS
August 7, 2012 | by Burton Caine
The Supreme Court let us down again by deciding recently in Fox TV v. FCC that it will not decide whether censoring speech on public airways is unconstitutional. Thirty-four years ago, the court ruled that the Federal Communications Commission could punish broadcasters on the public airways for speech that is "indecent" — but not obscene. That case involved George Carlin's popular monologue of seven words that you could never say on radio and television. His point was the hypocrisy of the government in banning some expressions and not others that may have included the same words, but used in a way that sex could be implied.
NEWS
July 22, 2011
By Joyce Eisenberg and Ellen Scolnic The F word used to get you a ticket to detention. Now it's a ticket to fame and fortune. Consider the "children's book for adults" Go the F- to Sleep and Gordon Ramsay's cooking show, The F Word . We have our own F word - three of them, in fact. We're talking about farchadat , farblondzhet , and farmisht - Yiddish adjectives that describe us these days. We're confused, distracted, and forgetful. We're women of a certain age. Need some examples?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2011 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Columnist
Wilfred is a comedy about a dog named Wilfred and his neurotic neighbor who (along with all the viewers) sees Wilfred as a man in a dog suit. It's a really terrible dog suit. I'm trying to be straightforward here because the show, premiering Thursday at 10 p.m. on the FX cable network, is so twisted. It's crude and hilarious and clearly aimed at a young male audience. Wilfred pants after his tennis ball, thrown over a high fence. TV executives think the young male audience is just as desirable and hard to find.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2009 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
JUST BECAUSE he died, doesn't mean you've heard George Carlin's final thoughts. Free Press, a division of Simon & Schuster, said yesterday that Carlin's "Last Words" will be published in November. Carlin, who died in June 2008 at age 71, worked on the book for the last decade of his life. He collaborated on it with author and humorist Tony Hendra. Behind the cell door The son of late San Francisco porn mogul Jim Mitchell ("Behind the Green Door") was to be arraigned yesterday on suspicion of killing his ex-girlfriend, Danielle Keller, and fleeing with their daughter Samantha on Sunday, the day mom hosted Sam's first birthday party.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2008 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
THE AMAZING thing about the late George Carlin isn't that he was perhaps the 20th century's greatest anti-establishment comedian - it was that he held the title for nearly five decades. Think about that. Through nine presidents. From the Vietnam War to the Iraq War. From a time when you couldn't say those seven words on television to a time when you can say anything on cable. There are other comedians who've had careers lasting 40-plus years, but how many of them were still relevant at the end?
NEWS
June 28, 2008
GEORGE Carlin's skeptics are probably ridiculing his passing by believing Carlin didn't make it into heaven because of his questioning of religious hypocrisy. Carlin wouldn't care because he saw heaven as an ambiguous word - just like so many others. He thought outside the box. He didn't let others define him - he let his life experience become his truth. He overcame a lot of adversity, which is probably the reason he was so brutally honest. George Carlin used strong language, but he was never intolerant, inconsiderate or racist - characteristics his critics sometimes display.
NEWS
June 26, 2008
Teen fatalities I read the front-page report of more teenage driving fatalities on a rural road in Chester County less than 24 hours after retaking the "55 Alive" driver re-education class sponsored by AARP ("Again, teens die on a road in Chesco," June 25). The class, if taken every three years after age 55, entitles Pennsylvania drivers to a 5 percent auto insurance discount. Sadly, the latest teen victims reportedly broke several rules stressed in the class: They were speeding, they crossed over a double yellow line, and they were not wearing seat belts.
NEWS
June 25, 2008
I'VE MAINTAINED for years that George Carlin should've been president, for he possessed far more intelligence and honesty than any actual candidate. Carlin's incisive wit peeled away the layers of bull that the government, organized religion and everyday idiots heap on the world, exposing human foibles with the visceral precision of a forensic pathologist. My introduction to Carlin occurred circa 1977 as I watched "Saturday Night Live. " He walked onstage and didn't utter a word, just stared blankly at the audience.
NEWS
June 24, 2008
"I love words. Thank you for hearing my words. " That's how comedian George Carlin, who died Sunday at 71, began his best-known monologue, "Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television," which was recorded on his 1972 album Class Clown. It would take more than seven words to sum up his long, funny, brilliant career. But when Carlin is mentioned, those seven words will be, too. You still can't say them on broadcast TV, or print them in most newspapers. But Carlin said them - to poke fun at authority, to talk dirty, and to stretch the ears and minds of his helplessly laughing listeners.
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