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George Harrison

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NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was known as "the quiet Beatle. " He was certainly the most enigmatic. So Martin Scorsese's biographical documentary, George Harrison: Living in the Material World , is something of a revelation. The two-part film, available on demand starting Thursday on HBO, is an intriguing portrait of the Beatles' junior partner and guitarist, who died of lung cancer in 2001. It combines home movies, archival footage, and a landslide of priceless snapshots, professional photos, and recent interviews with Harrison's son Dhani, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Billy Preston, George Martin, Eric Clapton, Phil Spector, and many others, conducted specifically for the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2001 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
By the time I was old enough to know who the Beatles were, they were no more. This must have been 1971 or so. John, Paul, George and Ringo had split for good the year before, and in my 9-year-old consciousness, that made the united Fab Four residents of an irrevocable past. The solo Beatles, however, were a thing of the present, and George Harrison, who died in Los Angeles on Thursday, was obviously the best. The first post-breakup release by any of the band members was Harrison's All Things Must Pass in 1970.
NEWS
December 29, 2001
COULD Ephraim Levin really be as bitter and hopeless as he sounds (letter, Dec. 11)? I am one of those many baby boomers truly saddened by the passing of George Harrison. Like George, I'd like to think that most of us just try to be decent and kind people. Why waste time making bitter, sweeping generalizations about a generation of people you clearly don't understand? Peace and love still sound like great ideas to me, Mr. Levin. Connie McGuiness Myers Springfield After reading your article on Britney Spears ("Like a virgin?
NEWS
December 7, 2001
GEORGE HARRISON is probably one of the most underrated and underappreciated musicians in rock history. Some think that he gained fame only because of the Beatles. What they don't realize is that the Beatles were total synergy. Without one another, the band could never have existed. He was forever in the shadow of Lennon and McCartney, but his influence on their songs is as important as the lyrics that they wrote. Eventually, he gave us such classics as "While My Guitar Gently Weeps," "Here Comes the Sun" and "Something," which many consider to be the greatest love song ever written.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2011 | BY RANDY LEWIS, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Remember George Harrison's unforgettable opening line in the Beatles' 1969 hit "Something"? "Something in the way she moves / attracts me like no other woman. " Of course not, because he sings "lover," not "woman. " But "woman" is what Harrison wrote before changing one word that could have spelled the difference between a hit and a miss, an edit that's on display at the Grammy Museum in "George Harrison: Living in the Material World," a show focusing on the man pigeonholed early as "the quiet Beatle.
NEWS
December 1, 2001 | BY LARRY KANE, FOR THE DAILY NEWS
KYW-TV news anchor Larry Kane covered the Beatles when they first came to America in the mid-'60s. The Daily News asked Kane for his reminiscences about George Harrison. George Harrison was 20 years old when I first met him and the "guys," as we called them, in San Francisco at the beginning of the 1964 tour of the United States. He was a year younger than I was, but at the age of 20, had the slender face of a teen-ager. Shy and very much a loner, George was the hardest Beatle to get to know.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
George Harrison will forever be the Quiet One - by virtue of his comparatively slim discography alone. Aside from one undeniable classic - 1970's All Things Must Pass, which was reissued in expanded form earlier this year - Harrison's best work is scattered over a series of graceful late Beatles singles and 11 famously erratic solo albums. That makes appreciating his contribution a particular challenge: Even the hits compilations are incomplete. The Best of George Harrison, put out by Capitol in 1976, includes several of his most important Beatles compositions, including "Something," "Taxman," and "While My Guitar Gently Weeps.
NEWS
October 31, 2011
Barry Feinstein, 80, a photographer who chronicled the lives of seminal rock 'n' roll stars of the 1960s, and who was perhaps best known for the stark portrait of Bob Dylan on the cover of the 1964 album The Times They Are A-Changin' , died Oct. 20 near his home in Woodstock, N.Y. Besides his work with Dylan, Mr. Feinstein established his reputation as one of rock's semiofficial official chroniclers with two 1970 photographs: one of Janis Joplin,...
NEWS
June 21, 2012
Victor Spinetti, 82, a comic actor who appeared in three Beatles movies and won a Tony on Broadway, has died, his agent said Tuesday. Mr. Spinetti died Tuesday morning after suffering from cancer for several years, said Barry Burnett, the actor's close friend and agent. He won a Tony in 1965 for his performance in Oh, What a Lovely War but was best known for his appearances in the Beatles movies A Hard Day's Night, Help, and Magical Mystery Tour. At a London Beatles Day event in 2010, Mr. Spinetti said he was included in the cast of A Hard Day's Night at George Harrison's insistence.
NEWS
October 7, 2011
An article in the Thursday Magazine section on the HBO documentary George Harrison: Living in the Material World gave an incorrect title for the song that Harrison played to audition for the Beatles. It was "Raunchy. " A profile of actress Dylan Gelula in the Magazine on Thursday incorrectly referred to the show in which she appears, August: Osage County . It opened Wednesday night at the Arden Theatre. The Bill Toms concert on Friday at Milkboy Coffee in Ardmore, previewed in Friday's Weekend section, has been canceled.
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NEWS
December 12, 2012 | By David Wilson and Siddharth Philip, Bloomberg News
Ravi Shankar, 92, the sitar player and composer described as the "godfather of world music" by Beatles guitarist George Harrison, has died. Mr. Shankar, who first performed internationally as a child, devoted his adult life to Indian classical music. His audience widened after Harrison, who introduced the sitar into rock music by playing the instrument on the Beatles' "Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown)," sought out Mr. Shankar's tutelage. "It's with a very heavy heart that I confirm this sad news," his manager, Earl Blackburn, said in an e-mail Wednesday.
NEWS
June 21, 2012
Victor Spinetti, 82, a comic actor who appeared in three Beatles movies and won a Tony on Broadway, has died, his agent said Tuesday. Mr. Spinetti died Tuesday morning after suffering from cancer for several years, said Barry Burnett, the actor's close friend and agent. He won a Tony in 1965 for his performance in Oh, What a Lovely War but was best known for his appearances in the Beatles movies A Hard Day's Night, Help, and Magical Mystery Tour. At a London Beatles Day event in 2010, Mr. Spinetti said he was included in the cast of A Hard Day's Night at George Harrison's insistence.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2012 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Wonder upon wonders, "new" material from the Beatles is still springing forth — on Apple apps, videodiscs, CD, and soon at a movie theater near you. Material evidence George Harrison was the gearhead of the group — quite a good photographer and gadget lover — and also a media hoarder. Evidence comes to the fore Tuesday with the home-video release of Martin Scorsese's documentary film "George Harrison: Living in the Material World" and the simultaneous release of the Abrams Books multitouch iPad/iPhone/iPod e-book of the same name.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2011 | BY RANDY LEWIS, Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES - Remember George Harrison's unforgettable opening line in the Beatles' 1969 hit "Something"? "Something in the way she moves / attracts me like no other woman. " Of course not, because he sings "lover," not "woman. " But "woman" is what Harrison wrote before changing one word that could have spelled the difference between a hit and a miss, an edit that's on display at the Grammy Museum in "George Harrison: Living in the Material World," a show focusing on the man pigeonholed early as "the quiet Beatle.
NEWS
October 31, 2011
Barry Feinstein, 80, a photographer who chronicled the lives of seminal rock 'n' roll stars of the 1960s, and who was perhaps best known for the stark portrait of Bob Dylan on the cover of the 1964 album The Times They Are A-Changin' , died Oct. 20 near his home in Woodstock, N.Y. Besides his work with Dylan, Mr. Feinstein established his reputation as one of rock's semiofficial official chroniclers with two 1970 photographs: one of Janis Joplin,...
NEWS
October 7, 2011
An article in the Thursday Magazine section on the HBO documentary George Harrison: Living in the Material World gave an incorrect title for the song that Harrison played to audition for the Beatles. It was "Raunchy. " A profile of actress Dylan Gelula in the Magazine on Thursday incorrectly referred to the show in which she appears, August: Osage County . It opened Wednesday night at the Arden Theatre. The Bill Toms concert on Friday at Milkboy Coffee in Ardmore, previewed in Friday's Weekend section, has been canceled.
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
He was known as "the quiet Beatle. " He was certainly the most enigmatic. So Martin Scorsese's biographical documentary, George Harrison: Living in the Material World , is something of a revelation. The two-part film, available on demand starting Thursday on HBO, is an intriguing portrait of the Beatles' junior partner and guitarist, who died of lung cancer in 2001. It combines home movies, archival footage, and a landslide of priceless snapshots, professional photos, and recent interviews with Harrison's son Dhani, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Billy Preston, George Martin, Eric Clapton, Phil Spector, and many others, conducted specifically for the film.
NEWS
January 8, 2004 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The doctor who ministered to George Harrison in the last weeks of his life is being sued by the estate of the former Beatle, who died of cancer in 2001. Harrison's estate alleges that physician Gilbert Lederman forced Harrison, under care at Staten Island University Hospital, to sign a guitar for the doc's teenage son, though Harrison wasn't up to it. The suit, filed in federal court in Brooklyn, N.Y., says the musician tried to resist, saying, "I do not even know if I know how to spell my name anymore.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2002 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Year in and year out, when it was hip and when it seemed quaintly corny, George Harrison wrote humble songs about tending the soul. In lyrics piled with Eastern imagery and religious metaphor, he encouraged the pop audience he earned as a Beatle to engage the mystic and become open to the possibility hiding behind the clouds. He was reverent and graceful, and a little kooky in his zeal. But his was pop of deep idealism, and he used his guitar and considerable melodic gifts to sketch out blissful utopias where kindness reigned and consciousness was ever-expanding.
NEWS
December 29, 2001
COULD Ephraim Levin really be as bitter and hopeless as he sounds (letter, Dec. 11)? I am one of those many baby boomers truly saddened by the passing of George Harrison. Like George, I'd like to think that most of us just try to be decent and kind people. Why waste time making bitter, sweeping generalizations about a generation of people you clearly don't understand? Peace and love still sound like great ideas to me, Mr. Levin. Connie McGuiness Myers Springfield After reading your article on Britney Spears ("Like a virgin?
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