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George Lazenby

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1998 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
James Bond likes his martinis shaken but not stirred, but if you prefer your 007 movies neat and full strength, From Russia With Love is just the right potion. Filmed in 1963, From Russia with Love was the second in an incredibly durable series that has survived the end of the Cold War and even the calamitous casting of George Lazenby for one outing (On Her Majesty's Secret Service). For my money it remains the best ever. Bonds ranging from Roger Moore to Timothy Dalton and Pierce Brosnan have all contributed something to the myth, but Sean Connery will own this part forever.
NEWS
March 16, 1997 | By Jim Farber, FOR THE INQUIRER
James Bond survived the collapse of the Cold War, a cease-fire in the sexual revolution and the onslaught of political correctness. But could he survive the first annual James Bond festival in Jamaica? Last fall, 200 revelers descended on the north coast of Jamaica, birthplace of the Bond books, to make one too many references to shaken-not-stirred martinis and trade campy retorts with some of the moviemakers who made Bond into an unkillable pop franchise. For four days, participants (paying up to $2,000)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1986 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Past holders of the office include Jason Robards, Edward G. Robinson, Rod Steiger, Paul Muni and Neville Brand, and right now there's a vacancy. With varying degrees of panache and campiness, all these tough guys have lent their growls to screen portraits of Al Capone. In life and death, the gangster and his bloody career have been the object of public fascination. Witness the recent Nielsen ratings for Geraldo Rivera's televised opening of a Capone's "vault" in the basement of a Chicago hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Although The Living Daylights is the most entertaining James Bond adventure since The Spy Who Loved Me (1977), it's not half so entertaining as the Iran- contra hearings. This might sound like a critical non sequitur, but consider that the new Bond film boasts a demento U.S. arms dealer in cahoots with a KGB maverick who defects at the drop of a bribe. Also consider that these money-hungry and bloodthirsty crooks cook up an arms-for-opium-for-diamonds scam involving Afghan rebels and occupying Soviet forces.
NEWS
November 1, 1999 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The best way to prepare for collectibles entrepreneur Jim Dubin's latest Hollywood film collectibles show is to make yourself a vodka martini. Shaken, not stirred! James Bond has been posted to the Holiday Inn in Cherry Hill, but his mission this coming Sunday (Nov. 7) will not involve spying for his boss, M. Instead, he'll be the star attraction at the James Bond Celebration, a memorabilia show offering Bond-related items like movie posters, lobby cards, publicity stills, autographs, toys, games and video tapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Nobody could kill James Bond, but a combination of legal wrangling and the end of the Cold War has put him in limbo. In 1971, Sean Connery returned to the series for his fifth Bond film, Diamonds Are Forever, after a wooden Australian named George Lazenby almost did in 007 in On Her Majesty's Secret Service. Diamonds Are Forever, which brings the suave secret agent to Las Vegas, is by no means the best of Connery's Bond adventures, but it is a reminder of why he remains the definitive 007. "Diamonds Are Forever" will be shown at the Philadelphia City Institute Library, 19th and Locust Streets, at 2:30 and 7 p.m. Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In stories marking the 25th anniversary of the James Bond films, you will find the names of the four actors - Sean Connery, George Lazenby, Roger Moore and Timothy Dalton - who have played Bond in the "official" series and occasional mentions of David Niven's 007 in the weak spoof Casino Royale. But on Oct. 21, 1954, another James Bond made his first screen appearance. Admittedly, it was on the little screen, on CBS's Climax Mystery Theater. The one-hour show was a highly abridged version of Casino Royale, the first 007 novel by Ian Fleming, and concentrated on the baccarat game between Bond and that card-carrying villain Le Chiffre.
NEWS
July 31, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"The Living Daylights," an action drama starring Timothy Dalton, Maryam d'Abo, Jeroen Krabbe, Joe Don Baker and John Rhys-Davies. Directed by John Glen. Screenplay by Richard Maibaum and Michael G. Wilson. Running time: 128 minutes. An MGM/UA release. At area theaters. Twenty-five years of James Bond movies? At first it seems impossible, but after seeing the new Bond film (the 16th in all), "The Living Daylights," the notion begins to make some sense. If the early Sean Connery movies pulsed with adolescent sap, and the Roger Moore Bond was all self-conscious self- parody, like a smirking college student who affects a raccoon coat and a beanie, then "The Living Daylights" is like that same young man who, somewhere in the middle of his third decade, decides it's time to get serious, a pin-striped suit and a job. The most notable feature of "Daylights" is the presence of a new Bond, the fourth (George Lazenby was in there somewhere)
LIVING
June 9, 1994 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, New York Post, New York Daily News, Los Angeles Times
Pierce Brosnan, who first signed to play James Bond eight years ago but never got to play the role because of a contractual gotcha, is getting a second shot. His designation as 007 was announced yesterday in London. He'll succeed Timothy Dalton. Brosnan, 41, in beard and long hair for his current role of Robinson Crusoe, said he wanted to "shake up" the Bond image by playing up his darker and more humorous sides. "It's a magnificent role but it's time to clean the slate and start again," said the Irish-born actor.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | by Matt Wolf, Associated Press Reuters and other Daily News wire services contributed to this report
The name is Brosnan, Pierce Brosnan, and he's finally got a license to kill. The former star of TV's "Remington Steele" was named Wednesday as the new James Bond, the fifth actor to play 007 since Sean Connery donned a white dinner jacket for "Dr. No" in 1962. Devotees of political correctness will have to deal with the return of 007's suave, sexist ways in "Goldeneye," the first Bond film since 1989. "You're dealing with fantasy, so political correctness has to be eased up a little," Brosnan told reporters at the Regent Hotel.
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NEWS
November 5, 2012 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
'I wish I had had James Bond on my staff," John F. Kennedy is quoted as saying in the midst of the Cuban missile crisis, when war with Russia looked imminent. Dr. No , the first of the 007 movies based on Ian Fleming's spy books, had just opened - October 1962 - in theaters in the United Kingdom. Dr. No - released the following May in the United States, and starring Sean Connery as the unflappable lady-killer with a license to kill, dispatched to the Caribbean to stop a madman from disrupting U.S. missile launches - was enough of a success that another Bond movie, From Russia With Love , followed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2009 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
GEORGE LAZENBY, who did a one-shot as James Bond more than 40 years ago in "On Her Majesty's Secret Service," is suing his estranged wife, former tennis pro Pam Shriver, to try to void their pre-nup. TMZ.com reports that according to George, Pam is so wealthy, he feels bad and his kids don't take him seriously. Those would be his kids who are 5 and not quite 4, so Tattle's guess is that they don't take much seriously - except maybe SpongeBob Squarepants. The ex-couple's divorce has been messy for a year, and documents say George, 69, is asking an L.A. judge to throw out the pre-nup and award him $16,133 in spousal support.
NEWS
November 1, 1999 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
The best way to prepare for collectibles entrepreneur Jim Dubin's latest Hollywood film collectibles show is to make yourself a vodka martini. Shaken, not stirred! James Bond has been posted to the Holiday Inn in Cherry Hill, but his mission this coming Sunday (Nov. 7) will not involve spying for his boss, M. Instead, he'll be the star attraction at the James Bond Celebration, a memorabilia show offering Bond-related items like movie posters, lobby cards, publicity stills, autographs, toys, games and video tapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1998 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
James Bond likes his martinis shaken but not stirred, but if you prefer your 007 movies neat and full strength, From Russia With Love is just the right potion. Filmed in 1963, From Russia with Love was the second in an incredibly durable series that has survived the end of the Cold War and even the calamitous casting of George Lazenby for one outing (On Her Majesty's Secret Service). For my money it remains the best ever. Bonds ranging from Roger Moore to Timothy Dalton and Pierce Brosnan have all contributed something to the myth, but Sean Connery will own this part forever.
NEWS
March 16, 1997 | By Jim Farber, FOR THE INQUIRER
James Bond survived the collapse of the Cold War, a cease-fire in the sexual revolution and the onslaught of political correctness. But could he survive the first annual James Bond festival in Jamaica? Last fall, 200 revelers descended on the north coast of Jamaica, birthplace of the Bond books, to make one too many references to shaken-not-stirred martinis and trade campy retorts with some of the moviemakers who made Bond into an unkillable pop franchise. For four days, participants (paying up to $2,000)
LIVING
June 9, 1994 | By W. Speers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, New York Post, New York Daily News, Los Angeles Times
Pierce Brosnan, who first signed to play James Bond eight years ago but never got to play the role because of a contractual gotcha, is getting a second shot. His designation as 007 was announced yesterday in London. He'll succeed Timothy Dalton. Brosnan, 41, in beard and long hair for his current role of Robinson Crusoe, said he wanted to "shake up" the Bond image by playing up his darker and more humorous sides. "It's a magnificent role but it's time to clean the slate and start again," said the Irish-born actor.
NEWS
June 9, 1994 | by Matt Wolf, Associated Press Reuters and other Daily News wire services contributed to this report
The name is Brosnan, Pierce Brosnan, and he's finally got a license to kill. The former star of TV's "Remington Steele" was named Wednesday as the new James Bond, the fifth actor to play 007 since Sean Connery donned a white dinner jacket for "Dr. No" in 1962. Devotees of political correctness will have to deal with the return of 007's suave, sexist ways in "Goldeneye," the first Bond film since 1989. "You're dealing with fantasy, so political correctness has to be eased up a little," Brosnan told reporters at the Regent Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1992 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Nobody could kill James Bond, but a combination of legal wrangling and the end of the Cold War has put him in limbo. In 1971, Sean Connery returned to the series for his fifth Bond film, Diamonds Are Forever, after a wooden Australian named George Lazenby almost did in 007 in On Her Majesty's Secret Service. Diamonds Are Forever, which brings the suave secret agent to Las Vegas, is by no means the best of Connery's Bond adventures, but it is a reminder of why he remains the definitive 007. "Diamonds Are Forever" will be shown at the Philadelphia City Institute Library, 19th and Locust Streets, at 2:30 and 7 p.m. Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In stories marking the 25th anniversary of the James Bond films, you will find the names of the four actors - Sean Connery, George Lazenby, Roger Moore and Timothy Dalton - who have played Bond in the "official" series and occasional mentions of David Niven's 007 in the weak spoof Casino Royale. But on Oct. 21, 1954, another James Bond made his first screen appearance. Admittedly, it was on the little screen, on CBS's Climax Mystery Theater. The one-hour show was a highly abridged version of Casino Royale, the first 007 novel by Ian Fleming, and concentrated on the baccarat game between Bond and that card-carrying villain Le Chiffre.
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