CollectionsGeorge Thorogood
IN THE NEWS

George Thorogood

NEWS
August 20, 2009 | By Amy S. Rosenberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
His audience stretches out in front of him: six people at the bar. A dozen or two in the pool. Nine people lined up across the street at the hot-dog cart. A few folks unloading their cars in the parking lot. A handful out on the balconies, hanging towels. And, depending on the direction of the wind and the stage of the tide, sometimes even the people sunbathing on the Third Avenue beach can hear the strumming. Yup, Johnny Cash and George Thorogood covers from a one-man band, poolside in the afternoon at the Acropolis Motel in North Wildwood, the toasted and tattooed crowd bopping their noodles in the shallow end. Really, does the Jersey Shore get any sweeter than this?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | BY JONATHAN TAKIFF, Daily News Staff Writer
NEW YORK had Max's Kansas City and CBGB's. Los Angeles boasted the Roxy. Liverpool, England, had its Cavern Club. Here in Philadelphia, the pre-eminent rock 'n' roll club for many moons was J.C. Dobbs, a long chute of a room and hangout on the "hippest street in town," a/k/a lower South Street. Hot and happening from 1975 to 1996, Dobbs was the place where local heroes such as Wilmington's George Thorogood and Robert Hazard were discovered, where bands like Pearl Jam, Nirvana, Oasis, Green Day and Rage Against the Machine kick-started a buzz, and solo talents like Sarah McLachlan and Beck first faced and conquered a Philly contingent.
NEWS
August 6, 1986 | By MARY FLANNERY, Daily News Staff Writer
Internationally renowned rock music artists with roots in Philadelphia - including the Hooters, Patti LaBelle and Chubby Checker - will headline a fund-raising concert in February to benefit the new Philadelphia Music Foundation. Creation of the Philadelphia Music Foundation, which is to focus attention on present and past local recording artists, was announced at a press conference this morning by LeBaron Taylor, vice president of CBS Records, and Larry Magid of Electric Factory Concerts.
NEWS
February 8, 1988 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
Ornette Coleman, an alto saxophonist who led one of the first avant-garde jazz groups, will be featured at 9 tonight on a WRTI (FM/90) Black History Month tribute to black jazz musicians. Texas-born and reared, Coleman, 58, is a self-taught musician with roots in rhythm and blues. After a stint as a bebopper, he moved into free-form jazz in the 1950s with his quartet. The hour-long record show will be heard at the same time that one of Coleman's key former sidemen, drummer Billy Higgins, is playing live with the Timeless All-Stars in a live concert at the Afro- American Historical and Cultural Museum.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | By Jim Gladstone, Special to The Inquirer
Fighting a case of the flu, legendary rock guitarist Jeff Beck did not return to the stage for a highly anticipated jam session with fellow axman Stevie Ray Vaughan at the end of the pair's double-billed Spectrum show Tuesday night. Despite a pre-performance announcement of the jam by WMMR-FM (93.3) disc jockey Michael Tearson, Beck - who opened the concert with an hour-long instrumental set - failed to reappear after Vaughan's spotlighted 70 minutes. Epic Records spokesman Vivian Piazza confirmed reports that Beck had been suffering from the flu, and contradicted previous publicity that the jam was intended to be fixture of the Beck-Vaughan tour.
NEWS
May 1, 2001 | By Rashod D. Ollison INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The summer season at Penn's Landing promises to be just as hot as the weather. James Brown, Cheap Trick, Marcia Ball and 21 other performers will Jam on the River. Nanci Griffith, the North Mississippi All-Stars, and others will express themselves at the Independence Blue Cross-WXPN Singer/Songwriter Weekend. Jam starts on May 26, running from noon until 9 p.m., and will wrap up May 28. Tickets for all performances are $10 in advance and $15 at the gate. Singer/songwriter concerts will be July 21 and 22, and tickets are $5 in advance, $10 at the gate.
NEWS
September 18, 1992 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
1. Former home of Douglass "Jocko" Henderson, Emlen Street near Lincoln Drive, Germantown. One night in 1957, the legendary disc jockey was awakened by the doorbell. It was Sam Cooke, a 22-year-old gospel singer, and his manager, Bumps Blackwell, pushing Cooke's new single, "You Send Me. " As a result of the encounter, Henderson played the record and put Cooke on a show at the Apollo Theater in Harlem. Cooke soon had his first secular hit. 2. Lincoln Drive near Rittenhouse Street, Germantown.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2010 | By CHUCK DARROW, darrowc@phillynews.com 215-313-3134
The June 1976 JFK Stadium concert bill topped by Yes and Peter Frampton was the first of the long-gone venue's rock-'n'-roll mega-shows, but it was neither the last nor the most historic. Other memorable musical events included: Live Aid, July 1985 Any discussion of music at JFK has to begin with the American part of the three-city (London and Sydney, Australia) charity event held to raise money for Ethiopian famine relief. While London's Wembley Stadium hosted Paul McCartney, David Bowie, Phil Collins, the Who, U2 and Queen, South Philly welcomed Madonna (then arguably the world's biggest pop star)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1988 | By Jack Hurst, Special to The Inquirer
Patty Loveless, the rising country vocalist who will open a concert for George Strait on Saturday at LaCrosse, Wis., has just completed her third MCA album, scheduled for release in September. Loveless said that the forthcoming album has an acoustical sound. The singer's first Top 10 single was a remake of George Jones' "If My Heart Had Windows" - the title song of her current LP - and she has done another old song on the new album. It's the Carter Stanley (of the bluegrass Stanley Brothers)
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|