CollectionsGeorge Wallace
IN THE NEWS

George Wallace

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
It's amazing to me that so many people feign surprise that David Duke is such a popular figure in Louisiana politics. The sad truth is that David Duke is popular in the hearts of many Americans. Years ago, just after he shed the white sheets of the Ku Klux Klan for a yellow sweater, white shirt and tan slacks, I talked with him. He came off as just a nice guy who sort of reminded me of singer Pat Boone without the white shoes. It wasn't what Duke said that reminded me of Boone, but the way he said it. He was transformed to a soft-spoken, articulate man with an all-American, boy- next-door demeanor.
NEWS
May 20, 1992 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
In May 1972, I was traveling in Osaka, Japan. I recall awakening in the morning and looking at the front page of the shinbun (newspaper) outside my hotel room door. On it was a picture of George Corley Wallace, the controversial governor of Alabama. I was unable to read the story as my knowledge of Japanese was extremely limited, but I sensed that something terrible had happened to the man who had been an avowed segregationist and racist. With newspaper in hand, I approached a Japanese woman in the hotel lobby.
NEWS
September 14, 1998 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This article contains information from the Associated Press
George Wallace, the combative, cigar-chomping ex-governor of Alabama, a vivid symbol of stern segregation who four times ran for the presidency, died yesterday. He was 79. Gov. Wallace in recent years had battled Parkinson's disease as well as the lingering effects of wounds from an assassination attempt a quarter-century ago. He had been hospitalized repeatedly. Gov. Wallace entered the hospital Thursday, suffering from breathing problems and septic shock caused by a severe bacterial infection.
NEWS
September 16, 1998 | By George Zucker
George Curley Wallace always worried reporters. The once-segregationist Alabama governor, who died Sunday at age 79, was a magnet for trouble. I first covered Wallace in Indiana in the spring of 1964, the year after the newly elected governor made his defiant stand in the schoolhouse door. Then in his feisty prime at 44, Wallace entered Democratic primaries in Indiana, Wisconsin and Maryland, hoping to "shake the eyeteeth of liberals. " I watched him stroll through a restaurant in Gary, shaking hands with delighted diners.
NEWS
April 17, 1986 | BY NICHOLAS VON HOFFMAN
These last few days, the Democratic Party has been looking like a man bending over trying to pick leeches off his body; these particular leeches are the followers of Lyndon H. LaRouche Jr., who have filed for nomination in Democratic primaries across the nation. Party bigwigs awoke to the danger after two of them won the Illinois primary, and were slated as Democratic nominees for lieutenant governor and secretary of state. It's a measure of how vaporously thin a political party the Democrats are that scores of people can enter their primaries without anybody knowing who they are or what they stand for. The LaRouchites are widely believed to be fascistic anti-semites, though they just as easily might have been Marxists for all anybody knew.
NEWS
September 15, 1998
George Wallace, who died Sunday night at 79, altered American politics from the early 1960s to the present. Of all the Southern pols who stood in the way of integration, he was the most notorious - a reactionary role he later tried to live down. Other parts of his campaign spiel became politically respectable during his long strut on the national stage. Even some who loathed him for vowing "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever" in 1963 ended up echoing him on some other issues.
NEWS
September 19, 1998 | By David S. Broder
George Wallace, who died Sunday, had as much impact on American politics as anyone who never worked in Washington. From the none-too-sturdy platform of the Alabama governorship, Wallace forced his troubling view of the race issue into the center of the national debate and made his abrasive voice a lever that fundamentally changed both the Democratic and Republican parties. Quite an achievement for a man who was - for all his public bravado - as consumed by private anxieties as any public figure I ever covered.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jefferson B. Fordham, 88, an educator who was dean of the University of Pennsylvania Law School from 1952 until 1970 and a leader in the struggle for racial equality, died Friday in Salt Lake City. A. Leo Levin, a professor emeritus at the law school, said Dr. Fordham "was absolutely a leading force in building the Penn Law School up to great heights. " A six-footer with sparkling blue eyes and enormous energy, Dr. Fordham was called on by everyone from the President to Penn law students for advice.
NEWS
May 20, 2013
BALTIMORE - Benjamin Lipsitz, a lawyer who defended the man who tried to kill George Wallace, died May 10. He was 94. Lipsitz was chosen to defend Arthur Bremer, accused of shooting Wallace, a Democratic presidential candidate, and three others, including a Secret Service agent, at a Laurel, Md., shopping center on May 15, 1972. Bremer called his lawyer "my only friend. " With his daughter, Eleanor J. Lipsitz, as co-counsel, he conducted a strong defense in Prince George's Circuit Court.
NEWS
April 7, 1986 | By Claude Lewis, Inquirer Editorial Board
There are only a few photographs on the walls of my home library. One that I treasure is a picture of a thinner, younger me, walking and talking with Alabama Gov. George Wallace, who announced last week that he won't seek another term. The picture of him walking seems strange because Wallace has been confined to a wheelchair ever since 1972, when assassin Arthur Bremer shot Wallace five times while he was speaking at a shopping center in Laurel, Md. Wallace has been in the political arena so long, it was front-page news last week when he announced that he was not running.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
WHO KNEW that wealthy Wall Street types were so sensitive? According to TheWrap.com, an unhappy broker has filed a $25 million defamation suit against the producers of "The Wolf of Wall Street. " Paramount Pictures and Red Granite Productions are asking a New York federal judge to dismiss the suit by Andrew "Wigwam" Greene , a former employee of Stratton Oakmont, noting that just because the character Nicky "Rugrat" Koskoff has a receding hairline doesn't mean it was inspired by him. Greene said in his February filing that the character of Nicky is clearly based on him due to jokes about the character's toupee and certain biographical details.
NEWS
August 23, 2013
We only have to look back over the past 50 years, five eventful decades filled with anger and jubilation, riot and reconciliation, trespass and redemption. The struggle that started well before the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. looked out upon the National Mall and said "I have a dream" was marked with legendary words. Words of triumph. Words of fury. Words of defiance. Words like those written by the great American Langston Hughes. This was a fierce yet simple voice that spoke on behalf of the silent millions who saw their dreams deferred if not dashed on the rocks of a racist reality.
NEWS
May 20, 2013
BALTIMORE - Benjamin Lipsitz, a lawyer who defended the man who tried to kill George Wallace, died May 10. He was 94. Lipsitz was chosen to defend Arthur Bremer, accused of shooting Wallace, a Democratic presidential candidate, and three others, including a Secret Service agent, at a Laurel, Md., shopping center on May 15, 1972. Bremer called his lawyer "my only friend. " With his daughter, Eleanor J. Lipsitz, as co-counsel, he conducted a strong defense in Prince George's Circuit Court.
NEWS
January 20, 2013
James Hood, 70, one of the first two black students to enroll at the University of Alabama a half-century ago in defiance of racial segregation, died Thursday. Then-Alabama Gov. George Wallace made his infamous "stand in the schoolhouse door" in a failed effort to prevent Mr. Hood and Vivian Malone from registering for classes in 1963. Mr. Hood and Malone were accompanied by Deputy U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach when Wallace confronted them. Wallace backed down later that day and Mr. Hood and Malone registered.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
It's amoment of darkness and doom: A doctor sits opposite Adam Sandler's Funny People character, the big star George Simmons, and tells him, "I can't predict how this will play out, but I feel we have a rough road ahead. " The famous funnyman - played by the famous funnyman - has a rare type of leukemia. There are experimental drugs, but the odds are not in George's favor. And so Judd Apatow's long and winding, often wildly funny and sometimes mawkish movie begins. For a while, it's hard to predict how things will play out, and there's the feeling - especially deep in that second hour - that the rough road ahead is right under foot.
NEWS
October 14, 2008
John McCain is no George Wallace. But John McCain may be desperate. How else do you explain McCain's having let his campaign wander down roads that have raised comparisons to a dead bigot whose very name is synonymous with racist politics? This is the same McCain who lost the 2000 Republican primary in South Carolina in part because he criticized, then waffled, on the appropriateness of flying the Confederate flag over the state Capitol. Eight years ago, McCain blamed then-Texas Gov. George W. Bush's campaign for stoking up resentment among those South Carolinians who saw the Stars and Bars as part of their proud heritage.
NEWS
September 4, 2007 | By Harold Jackson
The man who tried to assassinate George Wallace will soon be free after spending 35 years in a Maryland prison. Arthur Bremer could be released before December because of time earned for good behavior. The announcement last week ignited a flood of memories for me. Wallace was shot in a suburb near Washington while running for president in 1972. About three months later, the racist governor of Alabama was brought to a Birmingham hospital where I had a summer job. Spain Rehabilitation Center was known nationally for its work with spinal-cord-injury victims.
NEWS
November 29, 2006 | By HOWARD LURIE
FIFTY-TWO years ago, the Supreme Court ruled that racial segregation in public schools was unconstitutional. Three years later, Arkansas Gov. Orval Faubus sought to defy the court's ruling by calling out the Arkansas National Guard to prevent the integration of Little Rock's Central High School. To enforce obedience to the law of the land, President Dwight Eisenhower federalized the guard, ordered them back to their armories and sent in federal troops. A few years later, in 1962, George Wallace was elected governor of Alabama by the largest popular vote in state history with the defiant declaration: "I draw the line in the dust and toss the gauntlet before the feet of tyranny, and I say, segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever.
NEWS
January 4, 2005
WITH Congress debating whether to relax the rules that would punish representatives for accepting bribes and having sex with pages, it's easy to disparage politicians. But some of them in that chamber were giants, serving the country with distinction. We just lost two: former Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm and Congressman Robert Matsui. Both were champions for the rights of minorities and progressive politics. In a hall filled with puffed shirts, these two mattered. Chisholm, of New York, was a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus, but refused to let her color dictate her decisions.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2004 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Just as Olympians train to prepare for an event, so voters train to prepare for the November election. From the satirical to the reverential, "Acting Presidential," a compelling movie program at International House today and Saturday, offers a variety of perspectives on past candidates and chief execs. Millhouse (1971, 8 tonight), Emile de Antonio's scathing compilation film of Richard Nixon speeches and TV interviews, lets its subject hoist himself on his own petard. Preceding de Antonio's political vaudeville is LBJ (1967)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|