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George Williams

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NEWS
June 16, 1995 | By Thomas Turcol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Democratic State Assemblyman George Williams is planning to switch parties in a move that could boost the Republicans' chances of reclaiming two Assembly seats in one of New Jersey's most politically competitive areas. The stakes are so high that Garabed "Chuck" Haytaian, the Assembly Speaker and new GOP state chairman, is aggressively courting Williams in an attempt to exploit the opposition's disarray when it can do the most damage - in this fall's general-election campaign. "I didn't quit them; they quit me," Williams said, referring to Democratic leaders, in an interview this week.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | By Galina Espinoza, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
When George Williams was just 10 years old, he learned about knocking on doors. As the fifth oldest in a family of 16 children, Williams went from house to house in his Maple Shade neighborhood, selling the aprons his mother had hand-sewn to help bring in some extra money. Williams was supposed to sell the aprons for 75 cents each. But he quickly figured out he could get a dollar for them and make a small profit for himself. The experience would come in handy when, at age 49, Williams once again found himself knocking on doors in the old neighborhood this year, hearing the familiar cries of "Hi, Georgie" from the same women who used to buy his mother's aprons.
NEWS
March 30, 2005
An editorial in Monday's edition on the Youth Violence Reduction Partnership erred in identifying the last name of a YVRP street worker. His name is George Williams.
NEWS
April 7, 1998 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bucks County District Attorney Alan Rubenstein says he will not charge a 44-year-old Bensalem woman in the shooting of her husband during a violent confrontation in which she was beaten and her life was threatened. Deciding that Donna Marie Williams' actions were "justifiable and in self-defense," Rubenstein said yesterday that he told Bensalem Police that they could prepare assault charges against Williams' husband. George Williams, also 44, is in critical condition at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia recovering from a gunshot wound to the abdomen.
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | By Juan C. Rodriguez and Jennifer Farrell, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Eighty-seven people - including one juvenile - were arrested Friday in South Camden after buying $5 bags of imitation crack cocaine from undercover agents as part of a drug sting involving county, state and federal law enforcement agencies, authorities said yesterday. The would-be buyers approached agents posing as drug dealers at Morse and Thorndyke Streets, said Greg Reinert, spokesman for the Camden County Prosecutor's Office. "Typically, they would walk up and purchase," Reinert said.
NEWS
April 4, 1998 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Bensalem woman shot and critically wounded her husband Thursday night during a violent confrontation in which she was beaten and her life threatened, police said yesterday. George Williams, 44, remained in critical condition yesterday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital with a gunshot wound of the abdomen. Williams' wife, Donna Marie Williams, also 44, was questioned and released after the 7:15 p.m. shooting at the couple's Lima Avenue home in Trevose, police said. Bucks County District Attorney Alan Rubenstein said yesterday that he would decide once he received a full report from police on whether charges would be filed.
SPORTS
May 19, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
Frank Thomas delivered shots with his bat. Albert Belle used his elbow. Thomas got four more hits against Oakland, and the visiting Chicago White Sox won, 10-4, yesterday in a game marked by Belle throwing an elbow at the face of A's catcher George Williams. Williams was preparing to receive a relay throw after Norberto Martin's sixth-inning single when he got smacked by Belle, who scored as the ball got past Williams. "The throw was off to the left side," Williams said.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | By Peter Landry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Homicide detectives last night were investigating the death of a 1-year-old Point Breeze boy who died yesterday afternoon after being left alone in the bathtub while his mother ran an errand, police said. Investigators said George Williams was found dead in the tub in his family's apartment in the 1600 block of South 19th Street when the mother returned about 12:30 p.m. He was floating in the tub, police said, and appeared to have sustained scalding burns. The boy's mother, Lynda Brown, 34, was questioned by homicide investigators.
NEWS
March 20, 1992 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The judge dumped on the trash hauler for illegally using Poplar Street as a transfer station. Municipal Judge Louis J. Presenza told George Williams, 41, that he had to be punished, and placed him on two years' probation, fined him $16,000, and ordered him to clean up the 1500 block of Poplar Street and 12 other littered spots in North Philadelphia. Two trash trucks confiscated from Williams will be kept until he produces their titles and proper insurance. Assistant District Attorney William Heiman said Williams ignored a city warning not to dump in the block.
NEWS
December 31, 1991 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Pauline Fleming said Michael Rainey, 20, got what he deserved for murdering her husband in 1989. Her daughter, Patricia, said she was "satisfied" with yesterday's jury decision to sentence Rainey to die for the robbery and murder of her father, Carroll Fleming, 72, on Dec. 7, 1989. "He took a life," she said. "It's something he didn't have to do. " Common Pleas Judge John J. Poserina Jr. imposed sentence. "The punishment fits the crime," said Assistant District Attorney Thomas Perricone.
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NEWS
August 30, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
A 40-YEAR-OLD man was jailed yesterday on charges that he preyed upon a 12-year-old runaway, forcing the girl to commit a burglary and then raping her in a Northeast Philadelphia motel earlier this month. On Aug. 9, police arrested the traumatized girl for the burglary and found a motel-room key she had been carrying, leading authorities to unravel the details of her sickening ordeal, according to an affidavit obtained by the Daily News . The girl told police she ran away from home in Atlantic City in late July and took public transit to Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Contributing Art Critic
William Trost Richards, a Philadelphia landscape painter of some renown during the late 19th century, enjoyed a working situation that few artists today are lucky enough to fall into. A wealthy patron, Philadelphia industrialist and art collector George Whitney, not only subsidized Richards and bought dozens of his oils and watercolors, but he also promoted the work among other collectors. The two were friends who corresponded regularly for about 10 years when Richards was out of the city.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By DAVID GAMBACORTA, gambacd@phillynews.com 215-854-5994
Imagine the stories you'd hear if you could somehow travel back in time and have a beer with George Williams. He could talk sports, especially baseball. He had been a helluva ballplayer once upon a time, manning spots all over the diamond for all-black teams in Philadelphia, his hometown, and New York. The game was different then. Jackie Robinson hadn't been born yet. Neither had Babe Ruth. Philly was different, too. Williams was one of the city's few black cops, and his job was to keep an eye on the neighborhood around 8th and Lombard streets, where a heavy concentration of black residents lived.
NEWS
September 16, 2010
George C. Williams, 83, an evolutionary biologist who helped shape modern theories of natural selection, died last Wednesday at his home in South Setauket on Long Island, near Stony Brook University, where he taught for 30 years. The cause was Parkinson's disease, said his wife, Doris Williams. Mr. Williams played a leading role in establishing the now-prevailing, though not unanimous, view among evolutionary biologists that natural selection works at the level of the gene and the individual and not for the benefit of the group or species.
NEWS
April 23, 2010 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They are senior citizens, some with gray hair, a few with bulging waistlines and receding hairlines. Yet a half-century ago, they were part of the youthful, original sound of Philadelphia - doo-wop. On Thursday, in the parking lot of a Mount Airy diner, members of the Tymes and the Neighbor's Complaint deftly belted out hit sounds of the 1950s and early '60's in crisp, a cappella harmony. They gathered in the lot of the Trolley Car Diner at 7619 Germantown Ave. for the dedication of a mural honoring the two groups and marking the diner's 10th anniversary.
NEWS
March 30, 2005
An editorial in Monday's edition on the Youth Violence Reduction Partnership erred in identifying the last name of a YVRP street worker. His name is George Williams.
SPORTS
August 20, 2004 | By Ashley McGeachy Fox INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Reluctantly, but very eloquently, George Williams acknowledged what most observers of track and field in the United States have thought for a while now. Various drug and doping scandals involving some of the most popular and biggest names in the sport have overshadowed these Olympic Games. Now people are skeptical. Is anything we will see on the track and in the field actually real? "There's a cloud out there," Williams, the men's coach of the U.S. contingent in Athens, said yesterday on the eve of the Olympic track and field competition.
NEWS
April 21, 2004 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George Williams, 69, of Medford Lakes, a retired professor of philosophy at Burlington County College who led antiwar teach-ins, amassed an extensive movie library, and taught philosophy to incarcerated youths, died of colon cancer last Wednesday at home. When the men in the family gathered to watch sports on television, Dr. Williams sometimes sat quietly among them, engrossed in a good book about philosophy, daughter KC Williams said. His interests were eclectic. He cared about global warming, the dangers of religious fundamentalism, and Disney animation.
SPORTS
September 28, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Villanova scored one of the biggest wins in the history of its women's soccer program last night, beating visiting Notre Dame, 2-1. The Irish (6-3-0) entered the game ranked ninth in the nation. Senior Julie Battista and sophomore Laura Johnson scored goals a minute apart in the second half as the Wildcats (6-1-3) rallied from a 1-0 halftime deficit. Junior goalkeeper Chrissy Dolan recorded 16 saves for the Wildcats. NCAA passing leader Kliff Kingsbury threw for a school- and Big Twelve-record six touchdowns as visiting Texas Tech beat New Mexico, 49-0.
NEWS
May 6, 2001 | By Marc Levy INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
William H. Pettit Sr. told his son to get out of New Jersey and go live somewhere else. Preferably somewhere out West, some 2,000 miles away, or farther. Pettit, a longtime corn and soybean farmer in Springfield Township, Burlington County, wasn't being cruel, but as a dairy farmer, Pettit, 75, was just serving up a dose of reality. "I told him that if he wanted to stay in dairy farming, 'you've got to go to where the cows are,' " said Pettit, explaining that land, equipment and cows would all be cheaper in the sprawling Western states, where there are more dairy farmers.
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