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Germ Warfare

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NEWS
May 8, 1988 | By Bob Garfield, Special to The Inquirer
Enterprise, Alphonso F. Williams Jr. knows, is the cornerstone of success. Henry Ford took a simple notion - the assembly line - and built an immense fortune. Steven Jobs and Steve Wozniak tinkered their way to Apple Computer riches. Debbi Fields built a better cookie, and the world beat a path to her door. What they all had in common was an idea, and the conviction to pursue it, damn the obstacles and deaf to the naysayers. So, too, Al Williams. Two years ago, he and his wife resolved to build their own business, and they have risked everything to make it happen.
NEWS
February 1, 1994 | by Leonard A. Cole, From the New York Times
Sen. John Glenn's Committee on Governmental Affairs, which begins hearings on radiation experiments involving human subjects today, should also consider the effects of past and present biological warfare testing on unwary citizens. Energy Secretary Hazel R. O'Leary, who prompted the attention about radiation experiments, has no formal jurisdiction over the Army's biological testing program. But she might have an interest in an early germ-warfare test. It took place in 1951 near Newport News, Va., where she was growing up. The Army released an organism called Aspergillus fumigatus at the Norfolk Naval Supply Center because most workers were black.
NEWS
December 29, 1990 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau The Los Angeles Times contributed to this article
Defense officials announced yesterday that U.S. troops in the Middle East soon will be vaccinated against possible Iraqi germ warfare, and the United States turned up the pressure on Saddam Hussein by dispatching 17 more warships to the region. The added naval forces, led by the carriers America and Theodore Roosevelt, will put 16,000 more sailors and Marines in the Persian Gulf region in about two weeks. They will join 35,000 Americans aboard 50 ships already there and constitute the largest American armada since Vietnam.
NEWS
November 20, 2001 | Daily News wire services
The United States yesterday accused Iraq, North Korea and four other countries of building germ-warfare arsenals, and said it worried one of them might be helping Osama bin Laden in his quest for biological weapons. "We are concerned that [bin Laden] could have been trying to acquire a rudimentary biological weapons capability, possibly with support from a state," said John R. Bolton, undersecretary of state for arms control. The existence of Iraq's program is "beyond dispute," he said, stopping short of making a direct linkage to bin Laden.
NEWS
January 11, 1993 | Daily News wire services
BUENOS AIRES 55 KILLED IN BUS COLLISIONS Three tour buses collided and burned on a narrow provincial highway, killing at least 55 people and injuring about 70 others, authorities said yesterday. The accident occurred about 10:30 p.m. Saturday in Santo Tome, a town in the northeast corner of Argentina between Brazil and Paraguay, 372 miles from Buenos Aires, Argentina. "Our bus tried to pass another. I don't know if it speeded up, but we couldn't pass it," said survivor Andres Vazquez, 23, of Paraguay.
NEWS
September 18, 1986 | By Aaron Epstein, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A former prisoner of war testified yesterday that he was one of hundreds of Americans used as guinea pigs in Japanese germ warfare experiments from 1941 to 1945. And other witnesses told a House subcommittee that the U.S. government is covering up medical data about the experiments, which Rep. Pat Williams (D., Mont.) called "the best-kept secret of World War II. " The veterans affairs subcommittee is weighing, for the first time, whether U.S. survivors are entitled to compensation for ailments traced to the prison camps in Manchuria, where Japanese scientists used humans for experimental injections, dissections, freezing of body parts, and infections of typhoid, cholera, plague bacillus and dysentery.
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
An administration proposal to expand a germ-warfare laboratory in Utah and allow work there on the most deadly microbes known drew criticism yesterday from opponents who said the risk of accidents was too high. "We need only think for a moment about the AIDS epidemic to envision some of the awful consequences of an accident at a facility or site where untreatable, deadly pathogens are stored, grown" and turned into aerosol mist, said Dr. Jay A. Jacobsen of the University of Utah Medical School's division of infectious diseases.
NEWS
August 3, 2001
"If we're an arrogant nation, [others] will resent us. . . . That's why we've got to be humble and yet project strength in a way that promotes freedom. " What wise words those were, spoken by someone who obviously had a vision for how the United States could lead in an interconnected world. The assessment was uttered by none other than George W. Bush, presidential candidate, during a debate with Al Gore. It is based on a truth that applies in world affairs as much as in school yards: Bullies make enemies, not friends.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
A century ago, Americans so vehemently hated the wolves of their Western states that they attacked them with germ warfare. Veterinarians deliberately infected coyotes with a disease called mange, hoping it would spread to the wolves, which it did, causing many of them to lose so much fur that they froze to death in the harsh winters. Now, according to a recent study by Penn State University researchers, mange survived in other animals long after the wolves were gone. And it has resurfaced in wolf packs reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the 1990s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
A century ago, Americans so vehemently hated the wolves of their Western states that they attacked them with germ warfare. Veterinarians deliberately infected coyotes with a disease called mange, hoping it would spread to the wolves, which it did, causing many of them to lose so much fur that they froze to death in the harsh winters. Now, according to a recent study by Penn State University researchers, mange survived in other animals long after the wolves were gone. And it has resurfaced in wolf packs reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the 1990s.
NEWS
April 18, 2003 | By Aparna Surendran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Plymouth Meeting podiatrist, using a false name, is giving away antibiotics to people who want to "be prepared for biological war. " The foot doctor's actions are illegal, says the Pennsylvania Department of State, which oversees the State Board of Podiatry. Physicians and ethicists have also condemned the giveaways, saying the podiatrist, John Mangano, 51, is preying on the public's fears and giving medicine that, if taken inappropriately, could build resistance to the drugs.
NEWS
January 6, 2003 | By Linda Rosenstock
It may come as a surprise to some that we don't make health policy in the United States based on portentous warnings from behind closed doors. There is actually a science to calculating risk. Making such sweeping decisions as President Bush has done on smallpox vaccination - keeping the public and experts in the dark - is simply indefensible. The limited support of medical and public health professional organizations for the vaccination campaign may lead people to surmise, incorrectly, that the mainstream of expert opinion is behind the President.
NEWS
October 2, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Revelations that the U.S. government shipped directly to Iraq samples of germs that could be made into biological weapons raises some obvious questions: How could we have done such a thing? And are we still doing it, if not to Iraq then elsewhere? The answer to the second question is no - but we were until recently. As for the first, scientists say that what seems clear in hindsight wasn't even on the radar screen a few years ago. "It was not a good idea, but it was standard operating procedure," Jonathan Tucker, a U.N. weapons inspector in Iraq in 1995, said yesterday.
NEWS
December 25, 2001 | By Seth Borenstein INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
For the man who spent decades cooking up anthrax and other biological weapons for the U.S. military, the biggest unanswered questions in the anthrax investigation loom as large as the deadly bacteria do under a microscope. "How did they dry it and how did it get to that particle size?" William C. Patrick 3d asked in a recent interview. Until 1969, when President Richard M. Nixon renounced biological weapons, Patrick was the nation's top germ warrior; he is now a bioterrorism consultant.
NEWS
November 20, 2001 | Daily News wire services
The United States yesterday accused Iraq, North Korea and four other countries of building germ-warfare arsenals, and said it worried one of them might be helping Osama bin Laden in his quest for biological weapons. "We are concerned that [bin Laden] could have been trying to acquire a rudimentary biological weapons capability, possibly with support from a state," said John R. Bolton, undersecretary of state for arms control. The existence of Iraq's program is "beyond dispute," he said, stopping short of making a direct linkage to bin Laden.
NEWS
October 23, 2001
IN THE LONG and largely unmemorable history of your paper, you have treated your semi-literate readers, as well as innocent bystanders, to a variety of tasteless, crude, factually dubious, hideously offensive headlines. However, all past and future Hideously Offensive Headlines (HOH) will be measured against "Anthrax Baby. " I did not think it possible, even for the pea-brained nitwits who run your outfit, to come up with an HOH in taste so poor. I realize that the knuckle-draggers that you write down to expect this kind of filth, but must you sink below even their oh-so-lowbrow expectations?
NEWS
August 3, 2001
"If we're an arrogant nation, [others] will resent us. . . . That's why we've got to be humble and yet project strength in a way that promotes freedom. " What wise words those were, spoken by someone who obviously had a vision for how the United States could lead in an interconnected world. The assessment was uttered by none other than George W. Bush, presidential candidate, during a debate with Al Gore. It is based on a truth that applies in world affairs as much as in school yards: Bullies make enemies, not friends.
NEWS
July 27, 2001 | By Steven Thomma and Warren P. Strobel INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Bush administration's rejection Wednesday of a U.N. agreement to prevent germ warfare left the United States isolated for the second time in less than a week on a major international issue. It was also the latest example of a unilateral approach to foreign policy that is disturbing America's allies and perhaps undermining the nation's role as world leader. On issues such as arms control, the environment and international crime, President Bush is fashioning his own version of his father's "new world order" to replace the Cold War balance between the United States and the Soviet Union.
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
The government of Iraq has said that it recently jailed a prominent, U.S.-trained scientist who helped create Iraq's germ-warfare program after determining that he was preparing to leave the country carrying sensitive documents about the program. The report reflects a major change in fortune for Nassir Hindawi, a microbiologist and former head of an Iraqi scientific society who had successfully urged the senior leadership of the ruling Baath party in the early 1980s to transform its small-scale germ research program into a major effort to produce pathogens and toxins.
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