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NEWS
January 21, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Watching Michael Haneke accept his best foreign film Golden Globe for "The White Ribbon" the other night was a bit strange. Strange because the slender, smiling, polite, white-haired Haneke looked like a kindly retiree pleased to have just made it to the early-bird special, and not the notorious purveyor of austere horror and cruelty of "Cache," "Funny Games" and now "Ribbon. " The Austrian filmmaker's latest is his most highly regarded, in part because he purportedly uses his knack for creepy atmospherics in the service of a Big Idea - that there was something in the repressive German culture of the early 20th century that gave rise to the horrors unleashed in subsequent world wars.
NEWS
July 15, 2001 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Rev. Ernest A. Spangler bangs his hand on the table and decries that fabled "one vote. " "This country was one vote away from making German the national language," Spangler said, referring to colonial lore that says in 1795, Congress came within one vote of making German the national language. The much-quoted anecdote is not entirely accurate. The vote was actually to translate federal laws into German. But it's probably better for Spangler that Americans did not adopt the language of Deutschland.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2009 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
German food isn't sexy, unless the thought of liver dumplings and pig knuckles gets you all in a bother to go for a hot polka. So I guess it's little wonder that Bavaria hasn't yet inspired contemporary American chefs quite in the same way France, Italy, Spain, and Asia have. This is a tradition built for belly-filling schnitzel comfort, not foamy molecular fusion. But while the slow fade of German flavors on the national stage is no surprise as we go light, seasonal, and trendy, the near disappearance of it from Philadelphia is hard to grasp.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | By Petria May, Inquirer Staff Writer
A clown named Scooter was decked out in paisley suspenders, plaid pants and a shock of curly, orange hair. Riding around on his bike, he commanded plenty of attention from the children. "Hello, Mr. Clown," said one. Scooter the clown held out his horn so the little boy could push it to create a moment of music. "This is my first year in this parade," said Scooter. "I used to watch it on television. " The 19th annual Steuben Day Parade, in honor of Baron Frederick William Augustus von Steuben, the Prussian soldier praised for transforming George Washington's Continental Army into an effective fighting force during the American Revolution, was held yesterday in Center City.
NEWS
March 23, 1986 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
It happens every year in late winter. The Colonial Ethnic Societies of Philadelphia get the colors out of the mothballs and gather 'round the festive boards to honor their heritage. Three societies celebrated their roots this month. The Welsh Society, founded in 1729, held its annual St. David's Day dinner, honoring the patron saint of Wales, on March 1. The Friendly Sons of St. Patrick toasted the patron saint of Ireland on March 17. And, sandwiched in between, was the 221st anniversary dinner of the German Society of Pennsylvania, founded in 1764, on March 15. There are other Colonial Ethnic Societies, of course - the St. Andrew Society, the Society of the Sons of St. George, the Scotch-Irish Society and the Daughters of the British Empire, to name a few. And they're all part of one of America's greatest blessings - a little thing called tradition, the glue of this pluralistic society.
NEWS
March 19, 1999 | by Jack Mathews, New York Daily News
Think of it as a German version of "Pennies from Heaven," a musical drama whose cheerful, whimsical, sometimes downright silly lyrics fly in the face of the grim reality of its pre-World War II setting, and you have a fair notion of the tone of Joseph Vilsmaier's "The Harmonists. " Now, realize it's a true story being told, of a beloved, internationally known singing group - five vocalists and a pianist (or three Aryans and three Jews, as the Third Reich counted them) - which was disbanded during Hitler's purge of "degenerate art," and you can appreciate the irony of the group's full name, the Comedian Harmonists.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
For the six members of the Jewish-German Dance Theater, it is simply "the issue. " It is an experience they grapple with every day. It forms the crux of their identities. It informs their relationships with other people. It figures so large that it cannot have a name - not the Holocaust, not World War II, not the War Against Fascism. So they call it "the issue," and when they say that, at least they know what they mean. However subterranean their language, these dancer-actors grab "the issue" by the horns in their dance-theater piece But What About the Holocaust?
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | By Sara Kennedy, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the little bell at the door of Walter Rieker's meat shop in Fox Chase announced new arrivals, the customers waiting for their orders in front of the counter good-naturedly passed the time in small talk about the weather, mutual acquaintances and the heavy loads of smoked meats spread before them in bountiful array. It was a normal day and a normal gaggle of shoppers, but to fully appreciate the banter, it helped to know your leberkase from your gundelsheimer: The conversation was carried on in German.
NEWS
April 23, 1989 | By Dan DeLuca, Special to The Inquirer
Otto Leukert is a time traveler. On the third Saturday of each month, he takes a group of more than 150 people away from where they are, and back to the place they came from. Leukert doesn't work his wonders with fancy tricks or formulas. He doesn't do it with mirrors. All he has up his sleeve is a commitment to preserve his culture, a big screen and a projector. It's the magic of the movies. Leukert runs the German Filmfest, a monthly series of German-language films that has a devoted following among German-Americans - primarily senior citizens - in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For South Jersey high school students taking German, the springtime Sprachfest celebration is an annual tradition. Schalick High School's German Club hosted this year's event on March 24 at the Pittsgrove high school. "It's an opportunity for German students to hone their German-speaking skills and to learn more about German culture," said Christine Webb, a German teacher at Schalick and the German Club adviser. Sponsored by the South Jersey chapter of the American Association of Teachers of German, the Swiss Institute in New York City, the German Embassy, the Austrian Cultural Institute, the Goethe-Institute, and other groups, the event centered on German recitations of original and published works.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 25, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Visitors to the region's museums will have a rare opportunity this spring to explore the many-faceted aspects of fraktur, the sharp-angled design employed largely in German letters and printing, and much favored in the past by area communities. Multiple institutions will be participating in the fraktur extravaganza, a reflection of the region's Pennsylvania Dutch backstory. If letters and related everyday objects are not something you fancy, perhaps a mammoth prehistoric snake will do, or the witticisms of Oscar Wilde, or a full-scale model of an 18th-century schooner.
NEWS
January 21, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
Watching Michael Haneke accept his best foreign film Golden Globe for "The White Ribbon" the other night was a bit strange. Strange because the slender, smiling, polite, white-haired Haneke looked like a kindly retiree pleased to have just made it to the early-bird special, and not the notorious purveyor of austere horror and cruelty of "Cache," "Funny Games" and now "Ribbon. " The Austrian filmmaker's latest is his most highly regarded, in part because he purportedly uses his knack for creepy atmospherics in the service of a Big Idea - that there was something in the repressive German culture of the early 20th century that gave rise to the horrors unleashed in subsequent world wars.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2009 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
German food isn't sexy, unless the thought of liver dumplings and pig knuckles gets you all in a bother to go for a hot polka. So I guess it's little wonder that Bavaria hasn't yet inspired contemporary American chefs quite in the same way France, Italy, Spain, and Asia have. This is a tradition built for belly-filling schnitzel comfort, not foamy molecular fusion. But while the slow fade of German flavors on the national stage is no surprise as we go light, seasonal, and trendy, the near disappearance of it from Philadelphia is hard to grasp.
NEWS
July 15, 2001 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Rev. Ernest A. Spangler bangs his hand on the table and decries that fabled "one vote. " "This country was one vote away from making German the national language," Spangler said, referring to colonial lore that says in 1795, Congress came within one vote of making German the national language. The much-quoted anecdote is not entirely accurate. The vote was actually to translate federal laws into German. But it's probably better for Spangler that Americans did not adopt the language of Deutschland.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | By Andrew Bender FOR THE INQUIRER
I enter the J?dengasse from the north, between a bookstore and a wine shop, wondering what I will find. This cobblestone alley is barely six feet across, and the sidewalk varies from a couple of feet on each side to nil. The buildings are a mix of brick, stucco and half-timbered, two to four stories tall; in some places the stucco has broken off, and I can see where arches once stood. I turn around and notice that shops have been built over the alley entrance, making the whole space seem rather narrow and lacking for sky. In short, it looks like many other side streets in this beautiful and remarkably well-preserved old town of 31,500, the center of the Saale-Unstrut wine country.
NEWS
April 1, 2001 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For South Jersey high school students taking German, the springtime Sprachfest celebration is an annual tradition. Schalick High School's German Club hosted this year's event on March 24 at the Pittsgrove high school. "It's an opportunity for German students to hone their German-speaking skills and to learn more about German culture," said Christine Webb, a German teacher at Schalick and the German Club adviser. Sponsored by the South Jersey chapter of the American Association of Teachers of German, the Swiss Institute in New York City, the German Embassy, the Austrian Cultural Institute, the Goethe-Institute, and other groups, the event centered on German recitations of original and published works.
NEWS
March 19, 1999 | by Jack Mathews, New York Daily News
Think of it as a German version of "Pennies from Heaven," a musical drama whose cheerful, whimsical, sometimes downright silly lyrics fly in the face of the grim reality of its pre-World War II setting, and you have a fair notion of the tone of Joseph Vilsmaier's "The Harmonists. " Now, realize it's a true story being told, of a beloved, internationally known singing group - five vocalists and a pianist (or three Aryans and three Jews, as the Third Reich counted them) - which was disbanded during Hitler's purge of "degenerate art," and you can appreciate the irony of the group's full name, the Comedian Harmonists.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1995 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The material culture of the Germans who settled in southeastern Pennsylvania has remained close to the surface in the region, in part because it remains dynamic. The historical aspect of that culture is enshrined in various museums and archives all around us. One of the more significant of these repositories is the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art at Ursinus College in Collegeville. The museum owes its prominence in the field to a 5,000-object collection of Pennsylvania German artifacts and the Alfred L. Shoemaker Folk Culture card file, 120,000 entries dealing with a variety of folklife subjects.
NEWS
August 9, 1994 | By Gloria A. Hoffner and Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENTS
Christian A. Williams, who will be a senior at the Haverford School, received the United German-American Committee of the USA Award for distinguished achievement in German for his excellence in the language. In a German proficiency exam administered nationwide by the American Association of Teachers of German, Williams scored in the 99th percentile. At a spring ceremony, he was honored with 22 other high school students nationwide. The award recognizes third-year students who have achieved distinction in the study of the German language and who have demonstrated an interest in international/cross-cultural relations.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | By Petria May, Inquirer Staff Writer
A clown named Scooter was decked out in paisley suspenders, plaid pants and a shock of curly, orange hair. Riding around on his bike, he commanded plenty of attention from the children. "Hello, Mr. Clown," said one. Scooter the clown held out his horn so the little boy could push it to create a moment of music. "This is my first year in this parade," said Scooter. "I used to watch it on television. " The 19th annual Steuben Day Parade, in honor of Baron Frederick William Augustus von Steuben, the Prussian soldier praised for transforming George Washington's Continental Army into an effective fighting force during the American Revolution, was held yesterday in Center City.
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