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October 3, 2003 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Germany scored three goals in a five-minute span of the second half yesterday to rout Russia, 7-1, in the quarterfinals of the Women's World Cup last night. The Germans, who have outscored their World Cup competition by 20-3 while going 4-0, play the United States in the semifinals on Sunday, also at Portland's PGE Park. Birgit Prinz and Kerstin Garefrekes each scored twice for Germany, which had six second-half goals. Sandra Minnert began Germany's goal flurry with a header off a corner kick by Stefanie Gottsclich that made it 2-0 in the 57th minute.
SPORTS
July 1, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
BOCHUM, Germany - Although France and host Germany qualified for the Women's World Cup quarterfinals yesterday, only one team was celebrating before the two meet to decide which tops Group A. France eliminated Canada with a resounding 4-0 victory to advance for the first time, while Germany stumbled over the line with a hard-fought, 1-0 win over Nigeria. Like Canada in the earlier game, Nigeria needed at least a point to stay in the tournament, and its players were given extra incentive with their regular match bonus doubled if they managed to beat the tournament host.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Germany issued six stamps Wednesday, including a commemorative on the famous Rendsburg Railway Bridge that spans the Kiel Canal. The 100-pfennig stamp, which continues Germany's significant-bridge series, depicts the bridge, also called a viaduct, which was considered a technical marvel when completed in 1913. In addition to the regular denomination of 100 pfennigs, the stamp is printed with the corresponding value in 51 euros. Other European nations also are including the euro values on stamps to prepare their people for the conversion to euros on Jan. 1, 2002.
NEWS
November 11, 2003 | By Ralph A. Herman
After crossing the Atlantic on the Queen Mary in February 1945 with 15,000 other soldiers, I went into combat as a rifleman in Germany. Within a month, I was wounded, and spent a month in a hospital in Paris. Then I spent time in various cities in occupied Germany. After VJ Day, I arrived in Stolberg, Germany. Very soon I met a lovely German girl, Mary, and we became very close. I was 19, and she was 17. But in mid-1946, after I had spent four months in Stolberg, it was my turn to return to the United States to be discharged.
SPORTS
June 25, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
Second part in a series previewing the top prospects coming to Philadelphia for this week's NHL draft .   MAKING HIS way to Madison Square Garden in New York 2 weeks ago to take in his first-ever NHL game - and Game 3 of the Stanley Cup final, at that - Leon Draisaitl was surprised to see the number of Rangers shirts and hats lining the street. In his native Germany, the streets are filled with soccer paraphernalia. "It's all about soccer," Draisaitl said with a laugh.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2004 | By Thilo Knott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just 10 years ago, the German unions were a source of power in the country's economy, setting the European standard for wages and work time, putting politicians into office. Now, the nation's seven unions are crippled, having lost clout and members. That's because Germany's once-thriving economy has faltered and its unions are losing ground as they face issues long familiar to unions in the United States: How do unions push for worker-friendly policies in government and on the job when the economy has soured?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2001 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
Just as the deutsche mark nears the end of its existence, Germany has struck its first gold coin in 86 years, a replica of the circulating one-mark piece. Germany, like other European Union nations, will change to the euro next year. The new coin will be identical in size to the mark but will be struck from 0.999 pure gold. The words on the reverse of the circulating mark, Deutsche Bundesbank, will be replaced by Bundesrepublik Deutschland, a reminder that Germany exists even after European currencies are merged in the euro.
NEWS
July 2, 1995 | By Carlin Romano, Inquirer Book Critic
AFTER THE WALL Germany, the Germans and the Burdens of History By Marc Fisher Simon & Schuster. 350 pp. $25 Marc Fisher's After the Wall promises a book-length take on recent Germany by the Washington Post's Bonn and Berlin bureau chief from 1989 to 1993. As such, it adds to a checkered, yet hallowed genre, the valedictory book by a returned American foreign correspondent. Like many books by journalists, "FCVs" receive disproportionate review attention from other journalists, beneficiaries of the false principle that if a book treats a subject prominent in the news, it must be high-priority news to book people (in fact, book people are more likely to care about a fresh translation of Robert Musil's The Man Without Qualities than, say, another second-rate book about politics)
SPORTS
May 7, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Venus Williams hammered fellow American Meghann Shaughnessy, 6-3, 6-0, yesterday in Hamburg, Germany, to capture the Betty Barclay Cup in her first tournament since winning the Ericsson Open in Key Biscayne, Fla., a month ago. Williams has a chance in the French Open later this month to pass Martina Hingis and become the world's top female player. Andy Roddick overpowered South Korea's Hyung-Taik Lee, 7-5, 6-3, to win his second title in as many weeks at the U.S. Men's Clay Court Championships in Houston.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | By DOROTHY STORCK
Albert Hodkinson told me to watch for him. He'd be in the second group marching, the one forming at Downing Street behind the first brigade, which was the seriously wounded from World War II. He was tall, he said, and he would be wearing an English cap. He was in London again this year, as he'd come back for so many years, to march in the Remembrance Day parade with - as he put it - "the lads. " Albert Hodkinson, retired engineer and now U.S. citizen living in Philadelphia, was once a navigator in the British Bomber Command, Royal Air Force.
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NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lieselotte Ursula Amalie Shuster, 95, of Hatboro, a mother and traveler who never forgot her homeland in Germany, died Sunday, April 19, of cardiovascular disease at home. Mrs. Shuster was born in Erpfingen, Germany, the daughter of Georg and Berta Hoch Lenz. She grew up in Goenningen, where her father was a teacher and her mother was active in church. In 1939, she arrived in the United States for a visit with an aunt who lived near New York City. After World War II began, it was too dangerous for her to return home.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The other Merck said Monday that it would spend $17 billion to buy the chemical company Sigma-Aldrich Corp., based in St. Louis. Merck KGaA of Darmstadt, Germany, made Monday's announcement. Merck & Co. is based in Whitehouse Station, N.J., and has a big operation in Montgomery County. Both companies make pharmaceutical products. They are separate corporations now, but it was not always so. Amid the death, destruction, and fear of foreigners during World War I, the U.S. government announced in 1917 that it would seize several companies with German connections.
SPORTS
July 16, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Soccer's 20th World Cup ended in a magic moment for Germany, which needed extra time but scored just enough goals on Sunday afternoon to hoist the trophy for the fourth time. The tournament was also, from the perspective of the United States, a pretty successful run for Germans as well. Not only did head coach Jurgen Klinsmann, the legendary German striker and team manager, lead the United States out of group play and into the round of 16, a pleasant surprise itself, but three of the five goals scored by the United States in its four matches were netted by players who were raised within the German national team system.
NEWS
July 15, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
After nearly two hours of grinding, scoreless soccer between Germany and Argentina on Sunday, deep into the second period of overtime in the World Cup, Germany's Mario Goetze finally knocked in a goal. A huge crowd watching a huge screen TV in the middle of the closed 700 block of South Street erupted with cheers. And then began to chant: "Deutschland!" "Deutschland!" "Deutschland!" The massive block party, organized by Brauhaus Schmitz, a restaurant and beer hall on the block and the unofficial epicenter of German soccer fandom in Philadelphia, showered itself with confetti.
SPORTS
July 11, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Alex Seldin of Chestnut Hill didn't have to run into Tim Howard to make his World Cup trip memorable. (Although he did; Howard's mother, too.) Seldin also spent time with Captain America and Miss Liberty and the rest of the American Outlaws roaming all over Brazil. A lawyer and entrepreneur, and a big soccer fan since his high school playing days in the '80s, Seldin went to one previous World Cup, in Germany in 2006. Seeing another American in Nuremberg that year was usually cause to stop and have a chat, find out who he was and how he got there, trading tales.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ & CINDY STANSBURY, Daily News Staff Writers madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
AT HALFTIME, with Germany leading Brazil 5-0, Tim Stegmann of Muenster, Germany, ran to a Philly Dunkin' Donuts to find Wi-Fi to get a hold of his family and talk about the good news. "It's like a dream," said Stegmann, 22, who is traveling from New York to Miami on vacation. He was referring to yesterday's 2014 World Cup soccer semifinal. The game in Brazil ended 7-1, keeping the home country from the finals. The Netherlands and Argentina meet today in the other semifinal. The final is Sunday.
SPORTS
June 27, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
THERE MAY come a moment in today's final Group G match between the United States and Germany when both teams determine it would be prudent to settle for a draw. It will not, as some cynics have suggested, be a predetermined conspiracy to ensure that both nations get the valuable point that will push them into the round of 16 of the 2014 World Cup. Depending on how the game plays out, there could come a point late in the second half when, if the score is even, the USA and Germany reach the same conclusion - that the bird already secured in the basket is too valuable to risk losing it by chasing after another bird.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like others who share his heritage, Ralf Wiedemann agonizes over what for German Americans is the pressing question of the day: Whom to root for during Thursday's critical World Cup game between the United States and Germany? The winner advances, the loser could be out, and a tie benefits both. That set of circumstances, enhanced by the unusual connections between the teams - beginning with the Americans' German coach - provokes a sense of anxious ambiguity among fans who would surely cheer for one team if they weren't cheering for the other.
SPORTS
June 25, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
Second part in a series previewing the top prospects coming to Philadelphia for this week's NHL draft .   MAKING HIS way to Madison Square Garden in New York 2 weeks ago to take in his first-ever NHL game - and Game 3 of the Stanley Cup final, at that - Leon Draisaitl was surprised to see the number of Rangers shirts and hats lining the street. In his native Germany, the streets are filled with soccer paraphernalia. "It's all about soccer," Draisaitl said with a laugh.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Long, grueling months of World Cup planning and preparation paid off big for the Germans this week. For the soccer team, sure. It thrashed Portugal. But on a local level, too - for the Brauhaus Schmitz restaurant on South Street. Before the doors opened Monday, the venue's owners devised and implemented a special flat-fee admission plan. Work schedules were checked and rechecked, advertising booked and delivered. Staffers hung extra big-screen TVs and decorated the restaurant in Deutschland banners of black, red, and gold.
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