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SPORTS
October 3, 2003 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Germany scored three goals in a five-minute span of the second half yesterday to rout Russia, 7-1, in the quarterfinals of the Women's World Cup last night. The Germans, who have outscored their World Cup competition by 20-3 while going 4-0, play the United States in the semifinals on Sunday, also at Portland's PGE Park. Birgit Prinz and Kerstin Garefrekes each scored twice for Germany, which had six second-half goals. Sandra Minnert began Germany's goal flurry with a header off a corner kick by Stefanie Gottsclich that made it 2-0 in the 57th minute.
SPORTS
July 1, 2011 | Daily News Wire Services
BOCHUM, Germany - Although France and host Germany qualified for the Women's World Cup quarterfinals yesterday, only one team was celebrating before the two meet to decide which tops Group A. France eliminated Canada with a resounding 4-0 victory to advance for the first time, while Germany stumbled over the line with a hard-fought, 1-0 win over Nigeria. Like Canada in the earlier game, Nigeria needed at least a point to stay in the tournament, and its players were given extra incentive with their regular match bonus doubled if they managed to beat the tournament host.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Germany issued six stamps Wednesday, including a commemorative on the famous Rendsburg Railway Bridge that spans the Kiel Canal. The 100-pfennig stamp, which continues Germany's significant-bridge series, depicts the bridge, also called a viaduct, which was considered a technical marvel when completed in 1913. In addition to the regular denomination of 100 pfennigs, the stamp is printed with the corresponding value in 51 euros. Other European nations also are including the euro values on stamps to prepare their people for the conversion to euros on Jan. 1, 2002.
NEWS
November 11, 2003 | By Ralph A. Herman
After crossing the Atlantic on the Queen Mary in February 1945 with 15,000 other soldiers, I went into combat as a rifleman in Germany. Within a month, I was wounded, and spent a month in a hospital in Paris. Then I spent time in various cities in occupied Germany. After VJ Day, I arrived in Stolberg, Germany. Very soon I met a lovely German girl, Mary, and we became very close. I was 19, and she was 17. But in mid-1946, after I had spent four months in Stolberg, it was my turn to return to the United States to be discharged.
SPORTS
June 25, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
Second part in a series previewing the top prospects coming to Philadelphia for this week's NHL draft .   MAKING HIS way to Madison Square Garden in New York 2 weeks ago to take in his first-ever NHL game - and Game 3 of the Stanley Cup final, at that - Leon Draisaitl was surprised to see the number of Rangers shirts and hats lining the street. In his native Germany, the streets are filled with soccer paraphernalia. "It's all about soccer," Draisaitl said with a laugh.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2004 | By Thilo Knott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just 10 years ago, the German unions were a source of power in the country's economy, setting the European standard for wages and work time, putting politicians into office. Now, the nation's seven unions are crippled, having lost clout and members. That's because Germany's once-thriving economy has faltered and its unions are losing ground as they face issues long familiar to unions in the United States: How do unions push for worker-friendly policies in government and on the job when the economy has soured?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2001 | By Henri Sault FOR THE INQUIRER
Just as the deutsche mark nears the end of its existence, Germany has struck its first gold coin in 86 years, a replica of the circulating one-mark piece. Germany, like other European Union nations, will change to the euro next year. The new coin will be identical in size to the mark but will be struck from 0.999 pure gold. The words on the reverse of the circulating mark, Deutsche Bundesbank, will be replaced by Bundesrepublik Deutschland, a reminder that Germany exists even after European currencies are merged in the euro.
NEWS
July 2, 1995 | By Carlin Romano, Inquirer Book Critic
AFTER THE WALL Germany, the Germans and the Burdens of History By Marc Fisher Simon & Schuster. 350 pp. $25 Marc Fisher's After the Wall promises a book-length take on recent Germany by the Washington Post's Bonn and Berlin bureau chief from 1989 to 1993. As such, it adds to a checkered, yet hallowed genre, the valedictory book by a returned American foreign correspondent. Like many books by journalists, "FCVs" receive disproportionate review attention from other journalists, beneficiaries of the false principle that if a book treats a subject prominent in the news, it must be high-priority news to book people (in fact, book people are more likely to care about a fresh translation of Robert Musil's The Man Without Qualities than, say, another second-rate book about politics)
SPORTS
May 7, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Venus Williams hammered fellow American Meghann Shaughnessy, 6-3, 6-0, yesterday in Hamburg, Germany, to capture the Betty Barclay Cup in her first tournament since winning the Ericsson Open in Key Biscayne, Fla., a month ago. Williams has a chance in the French Open later this month to pass Martina Hingis and become the world's top female player. Andy Roddick overpowered South Korea's Hyung-Taik Lee, 7-5, 6-3, to win his second title in as many weeks at the U.S. Men's Clay Court Championships in Houston.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | By DOROTHY STORCK
Albert Hodkinson told me to watch for him. He'd be in the second group marching, the one forming at Downing Street behind the first brigade, which was the seriously wounded from World War II. He was tall, he said, and he would be wearing an English cap. He was in London again this year, as he'd come back for so many years, to march in the Remembrance Day parade with - as he put it - "the lads. " Albert Hodkinson, retired engineer and now U.S. citizen living in Philadelphia, was once a navigator in the British Bomber Command, Royal Air Force.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
As Germany struggles to integrate a million or so immigrants from Muslim lands, a once-taboo question has gone public: Are Islamic precepts compatible with the West? The government has emphasized economic opportunity as an antidote to radicalization, but has paid less attention to who will fund the mosques and imams to serve the refugees. Trudy Rubin writes from Berlin.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
BERLIN - On a trip to the beach, a German friend recently saw two teenage Afghan refugee boys stare in shock at female bathers in scanty bikinis. She overheard one youth agitatedly ask the German volunteer accompanying him: "Where are their fathers? Where are their fathers?" The good news is that the boy spoke German and had a German friend who could explain the culture gap between Afghanistan and Europe. The bad news is obvious: Germany has an overwhelming task trying to integrate many of the million or so Muslim migrants who arrived in 2015.
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
BERLIN - Shortly before the Brexit vote, Germany's Der Spiegel magazine ran a cover story that urged the Brits: "Please don't go. " For Germans, long the most loyal supporters of the European Union, it was unthinkable that the British would leave them. After the Brexit shock, Der Spiegel has a new plea: "If we don't become more passionate about the European Union, we will lose it," writes columnist Stefan Kuzmany. There is widespread agreement that the future of a united Europe will be decided more by emotions than facts.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
BERLIN - Should anyone require further proof that the promises of populists are worthless, they need only watch the latest psychodrama in London. Boris Johnson, the ex-London mayor and mop-haired Donald Trump clone who led the Conservative Party's "Leave" faction, just dropped his bid to become Britain's next prime minister. This was almost as shocking as the voters' decision to leave the European Union, since Johnson was the face of the Brexit campaign. But every glowing promise Johnson made before the Brexit vote has been walked back since by leading Brexiteers.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
BERLIN - Whatever happened to all those refugees? Last summer, TV screens were filled with horrific stories of Syrian (and Iraqi and Afghan) refugees risking their lives on sea and land to reach Germany. Chancellor Angela Merkel welcomed them as a matter of principle, but her decision angered other European nations. It also helped fuel a wave of European hostility toward immigrants and the European Union's policy of open borders. That hostility in turn fueled Britain's Brexit vote.
NEWS
June 30, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
DRESDEN, Germany - About 2,000 Germans gathered in the market square in this elegant old town to denounce Angela Merkel as a traitor - and to cheer Britain on for deciding to leave the European Union. They were taking part in the regular Monday demonstrations of Pegida, the German acronym for Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamization of the West. The Pegida crowd was waving the banners of Germany and the free state of Saxony along with signs saying "Thank you, Brexit. " I asked a group of middle-aged men in polo shirts, slacks, and sandals, all workers in a machinery plant, why they were there.
NEWS
June 27, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
BERLIN - If there is anyone even more upset about the Brexit vote than the British Remain camp, it is the Germans. Especially Angela Merkel. When she went on television after the results came in, she was visibly straining to maintain her usual stoic expression. "We need to stay calm and composed," she said, as if to convince herself. The German chancellor knew that the British decision had set Europe on the road to political disaster - including a possible breakup of the European Union - and that the hopes for preventing a disaster rest mainly on her. I heard the word shock used by every German I spoke with on the phone from London and on the flight from Heathrow to Berlin.
TRAVEL
March 14, 2016 | By Ellie Slott Fisher, For The Inquirer
I'm not one to let grass grow under my feet, so when my anything-on-the-water-hating boyfriend approvingly commented on a TV ad for a Viking River Cruise, I had it booked the next day. We spent eight stress-free days on the Danube River, departing Budapest, where we witnessed Hungary's brilliantly lighted Parliament Building from our ship - as captivating as watching a Broadway musical from the front row. From there, we navigated the still waters...
NEWS
December 22, 2015
CHINA Trash-pile collapse leaves 85 missing Rescuers searched Monday for 85 missing people a day after the collapse of a mountain of excavated soil and construction waste that had been piled up over two years in China's manufacturing center of Shenzhen. Authorities said the landslide buried or damaged 33 buildings in the industrial park in Shenzhen, a city near Hong Kong that makes products ranging from cellphones to cars. Residents blamed the government while officials cited human error, with one ministry saying, "The pile was too big, the pile was too steep.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
In recognition of the substantial trade between their two regions, Mayor Nutter and Frankfurt, Germany, Mayor Peter Feldmann on Wednesday formally announced a "sister city" relationship. The ceremony took place at the Center City offices of Morgan Lewis L.L.P., which itself has an office in Frankfurt, Europe's preeminent banking and finance center. Philadelphia is a significant U.S. entry point for German companies seeking to do business in the American market. "It's the perfect match," Nutter said in a short address at a reception for German and U.S. dignitaries and business leaders at the law firm's Market Street location.
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