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Geronimo

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NEWS
October 17, 2000 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than a quarter-century, the legendary Apache leader Geronimo eluded the U.S. Army in a guerrilla war defending his Southwest homeland. Today, 91 years after he died a prisoner of war on an Oklahoma military reservation, Geronimo is again the center of a dispute pitting the government, the Apaches and the Comanches against one other. The case, U.S. v. One Eagle-feathered War Bonnet, has been filed in federal court in Philadelphia. Its outcome will decide who is the rightful owner of an Indian headdress studded with 48 one-foot-long eagle feathers and valued at up to $1.2 million.
NEWS
December 10, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Read the credits to "Geronimo: An American Legend," and you'll notice the Native American actor who plays Geronimo is fourth in the cast list. Fourth behind the three white actors, showing just how hard it is for Indians to get a fair shake, even in politically correct Hollywood. The more things change . . . In the old days, many movies presented Indians as one-dimensional because they made convenient antagonists and nobody in the motion picture industry cared if they were offended.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1993 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There is contempt in Robert Duvall's voice as the actor, playing a grizzled cavalry scout who's survived umpteen gunshot and arrow wounds in his crusade against the Apaches, eyeballs Jason Patric and calls him "a sick case. " Patric, as an Army lieutenant from the South who talks in a fruity monotone that suggests he's just come from a Marlon Brando - The Early Years retrospective, offers his Prozac-stare in response. "You don't love who you're fighting for," continues Duvall's Al Sieber, "and you don't hate who you're fighting against.
NEWS
May 5, 2011 | By Susan Montoya Bryan, Associated Press
Geronimo was a legendary Apache warrior whose purported ability to walk without leaving footprints allowed him to evade thousands of Mexican and U.S. soldiers, much like Osama bin Laden evaded capture for the last decade. But for American Indians, there's an important difference: Geronimo was a hero - not a terrorist. So to them, the U.S. military's use of the revered leader's moniker as a code name for bin Laden was appalling - a slap in the face that prompted statements of disapproval from tribal leaders, a flurry of angry comments on social-network sites, and a letter from the leader of Geronimo's tribe asking President Obama to apologize.
NEWS
December 11, 1993 | by Bob Strauss, Los Angeles Daily News
"Geronimo: An American Legend" is the name of the film, but it's not the life story of the legendary Apache leader who waged the last significant Indian war in the mid-1880s. Rather, the film focuses on the final 18 months of that struggle, during which Geronimo and approximately 35 Chiricahua Apache warriors raided the desert Southwest with relative impunity, eluding some 5,000 U.S. and 3,000 Mexican troops assigned to stop them. "This is a war movie," admitted the film's producer-director, Walter Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1993 | By Lee Winfrey, INQUIRER TV WRITER
Geronimo must have gotten a new agent. This month the immortal Apache will star in a theatrical film, a cable telemovie and a cable documentary. Geronimo: An American Legend will open in theaters Friday, with Wes Studi in the title role. On Dec. 16, the A&E cable channel will present "Geronimo: The Last Renegade," an installment of its documentary series The Real West. The Geronimo triple play begins at 8 tonight on TNT with a telemovie notable for the large and impressive cast of American Indian actors it employs.
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ninety-two years ago, the war bonnet, studded with 48-foot-long eagle feathers, sat on the head of the United States' most famous prisoner of war. Geronimo, the Apache leader who eluded the Army for more than a quarter-century defending his Southwestern homeland, wore the headdress at a ceremonial farewell of surviving Native American chiefs called "The Last Pow-wow. " The five-day summit was in Collinsville, Indian Territory, shortly before it became the state of Oklahoma.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A lawyer arrested in Philadelphia last year when he tried to sell the eagle-feathered war bonnet that Apache warrior Geronimo wore to the historic "Last Pow-wow" pleaded guilty yesterday to a misdemeanor charge and was sentenced to six months of probation. By agreeing to plead guilty and cooperate with federal prosecutors, Georgia lawyer Leighton Deming, 56, escaped spending up to six months in prison and being fined $15,000 for violating the U.S. Migratory Bird Protection Act, part of which prohibits trafficking in golden eagle feathers.
NEWS
November 9, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has taken the first step to return to American Indians an eagle-feather ceremonial headdress worn 94 years ago by the legendary Apache leader Geronimo at the "Last Pow-wow" of surviving Indian chiefs. U.S. District Judge Berle M. Schiller on Monday ordered the transfer of the striking body-length headdress, studded with 48 foot-long eagle feathers and valued at $1.2 million, from the custody of the FBI and the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia to the U.S. Department of the Interior.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The Apache and Comanche Indian tribes are fighting in federal court in Philadelphia over a war bonnet that Geronimo, a legendary Apache chief, wore to the "Last Powwow," 93 years ago, in the Oklahoma Territory. The eagle-feathered war bonnet was seized in Philadelphia by the FBI last year after its owner and a broker tried to sell it, illegally, for $1 million, to an undercover FBI agent. Such a proposed sale was illegal because bald and golden eagles once were endangered species and their feathers can't be sold - even feathers that were harvested long before the Bald Eagle Protection Act was enacted by Congress in the 1930s to save the majestic birds.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 4, 2011 | By Linda Deutsch, Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt, 63, a former Black Panther Party leader who spent 27 years in prison on a California murder conviction that was later overturned, died Friday in his adopted home of Tanzania. Mr. Pratt died at his home in Imbaseni village, 15 miles from Arusha, where he had lived for at least half a decade, said a friend in Arusha, former Black Panther Pete O'Neal. Mr. Pratt's name and his long-fought case with its political backdrop became emblematic of a tumultuous era in American history when the beret-wearing Panthers raised their fists in defiance and carried big guns, striking fear in white America.
NEWS
May 5, 2011 | By Susan Montoya Bryan, Associated Press
Geronimo was a legendary Apache warrior whose purported ability to walk without leaving footprints allowed him to evade thousands of Mexican and U.S. soldiers, much like Osama bin Laden evaded capture for the last decade. But for American Indians, there's an important difference: Geronimo was a hero - not a terrorist. So to them, the U.S. military's use of the revered leader's moniker as a code name for bin Laden was appalling - a slap in the face that prompted statements of disapproval from tribal leaders, a flurry of angry comments on social-network sites, and a letter from the leader of Geronimo's tribe asking President Obama to apologize.
LIVING
January 19, 2007 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Indigenous peoples will be in the spotlight next week at two auctions: A classic photo of the Apache warrior Geronimo will be featured at Freeman's sale of fine books, manuscripts, maps and prints, and a collection of African and tribal art will be offered at Barry S. Slosberg Inc. The 5?-by-4-inch photo of Geronimo, which he signed on the back, was taken by H.W. Wyman at the 1904 St. Louis Exposition for Edward Ballard Lodge. One of Lodge's direct descendants consigned it to Freeman's.
NEWS
March 16, 2003 | By Cynthia J. McGroarty INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Perhaps you've heard of Geronimo but never of Lozen, of Langston Hughes but never of Jessie Redmon Fauset, of Daniel Defoe but never of Aphra Behn. Not surprising. Those unfamiliar names - all belonging to women - are rarely, if ever, mentioned in history books, despite the significant cultural contributions of their owners, female scholars said last week in observance of Women's History Month. Take Aphra Behn, the first woman writer to be published in England, said Jo Parker, an associate professor of English at St. Joseph's University who lives in Narberth.
NEWS
November 9, 2001 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has taken the first step to return to American Indians an eagle-feather ceremonial headdress worn 94 years ago by the legendary Apache leader Geronimo at the "Last Pow-wow" of surviving Indian chiefs. U.S. District Judge Berle M. Schiller on Monday ordered the transfer of the striking body-length headdress, studded with 48 foot-long eagle feathers and valued at $1.2 million, from the custody of the FBI and the U.S. Attorney's Office in Philadelphia to the U.S. Department of the Interior.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than a quarter-century, the legendary Apache leader Geronimo eluded the U.S. Army in a guerrilla war defending his Southwest homeland. Today, 91 years after he died a prisoner of war on an Oklahoma military reservation, Geronimo is again the center of a dispute pitting the government, the Apaches and the Comanches against one other. The case, U.S. v. One Eagle-feathered War Bonnet, has been filed in federal court in Philadelphia. Its outcome will decide who is the rightful owner of an Indian headdress studded with 48 one-foot-long eagle feathers and valued at up to $1.2 million.
NEWS
October 17, 2000 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
The Apache and Comanche Indian tribes are fighting in federal court in Philadelphia over a war bonnet that Geronimo, a legendary Apache chief, wore to the "Last Powwow," 93 years ago, in the Oklahoma Territory. The eagle-feathered war bonnet was seized in Philadelphia by the FBI last year after its owner and a broker tried to sell it, illegally, for $1 million, to an undercover FBI agent. Such a proposed sale was illegal because bald and golden eagles once were endangered species and their feathers can't be sold - even feathers that were harvested long before the Bald Eagle Protection Act was enacted by Congress in the 1930s to save the majestic birds.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A lawyer arrested in Philadelphia last year when he tried to sell the eagle-feathered war bonnet that Apache warrior Geronimo wore to the historic "Last Pow-wow" pleaded guilty yesterday to a misdemeanor charge and was sentenced to six months of probation. By agreeing to plead guilty and cooperate with federal prosecutors, Georgia lawyer Leighton Deming, 56, escaped spending up to six months in prison and being fined $15,000 for violating the U.S. Migratory Bird Protection Act, part of which prohibits trafficking in golden eagle feathers.
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ninety-two years ago, the war bonnet, studded with 48-foot-long eagle feathers, sat on the head of the United States' most famous prisoner of war. Geronimo, the Apache leader who eluded the Army for more than a quarter-century defending his Southwestern homeland, wore the headdress at a ceremonial farewell of surviving Native American chiefs called "The Last Pow-wow. " The five-day summit was in Collinsville, Indian Territory, shortly before it became the state of Oklahoma.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1994 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A tale of hustling in Manhattan and a portrayal of a famed Apache warrior top this week's list of new movies on video. SIX DEGREES OF SEPARATION (1994) (MGM/UA) 112 minutes. Stockard Channing, Will Smith, Donald Sutherland, Mary Beth Hurt. You can be a hustler living large in a penthouse high above Fifth Avenue or you can be a hustler scrounging in the bowels of Central Park; the principal difference is location. That is the epiphany of the nervy moral parable Six Degrees of Separation, a film adaptation of John Guare's award-winning play about art, race, class and imposture brought to the screen, crisply, by director Fred Schepisi.
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