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Gerry Dinardo

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SPORTS
December 9, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Penn State's Kerry Collins, who led the nation's top scoring offense, edged Colorado running back Rashaan Salaam last night for the Maxwell Award as the country's outstanding college football player. Collins also won the Davey O'Brien Award as the nation's finest quarterback. "I'm surprised," Collins said. "I'm very fortunate . . . I'm just thrilled. " In balloting by 1,171 football writers and broadcasters for the prestigious Maxwell Award, Collins received 98 more votes than Salaam, the fourth player in NCAA Division I history to rush for 2,000 yards in a season.
SPORTS
November 16, 1999 | Daily News Wire Services
Drug testing has reached a cerebral corner of the sports world: chess. Players at a Spanish team championship tournament under way on the Mediterranean island of Menorca were stunned to learn Sunday they had to provide a urine sample under doctor's supervision, the daily El Mundo said yesterday. The Spanish Chess Federation said it was acting on orders from the government body that oversees sports in Spain and regularly submits athletes to spot checks for use of banned performance-enhancing substances.
SPORTS
January 9, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
William "The Refrigerator" Perry will make his pro boxing debut Feb. 2 against Eric "Butterbean" Esch. Perry is 39, Esch 35. The fight will take place at the Grand Casino in Gulfport, Miss., the casino announced. Perry, the popular former NFL defensive tackle, became a household name during his rookie year with the Chicago Bears in 1985. He went on to play for the Eagles in 1993 and '94. In other boxing news: It appears the long-awaited bout between Oscar De La Hoya and Fernando Vargas for the WBC and WBA junior middleweight championships will be held May 4 in Las Vegas.
SPORTS
January 8, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Bob Stoops has decided to stay as Oklahoma's football coach, ending speculation that he would replace Steve Spurrier at Florida. Spurrier resigned Friday to pursue an NFL job. Stoops met briefly with Florida athletic director Jeremy Foley yesterday in Norman, Okla., and told him of his decision. Foley then left for Colorado, where he met with Denver Broncos coach Mike Shanahan, now the leading contender for the Florida job. Penn State coach Joe Paterno, who has more major-college wins than any other football coach in history, will receive the Amos Alonzo Stagg award today during the American Football Coaches Association convention in San Antonio, Texas.
SPORTS
December 2, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Tyrone Willingham blamed himself yesterday for his firing as Notre Dame coach, saying he failed to meet the school's expectations of producing an elite team. But Willingham, whose 3-year tenure was the shortest of any non-interim coach at the school in 70 years, wouldn't say whether he was given enough time to turn the storied program back into a football power. "I don't get into what's fair and what's not fair. I am an optimist by nature, but I am also a realist, and that makes you deal with the events as they occur," he said.
SPORTS
July 24, 2003 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Big Ten Conference commissioner Jim Delany estimated that a league championship game in football would generate $10 million to $15 million, a sum that could ease the strain on universities struggling to meet their growing athletic budgets. But would it be worth it? Judging from responses by coaches yesterday at the annual Big Ten media session, the answer is no. Among the reasons given: Such a game would add to the academic burden on players, make it more difficult for their teams to qualify for the national championship game, and take the luster off some of the conference's storied late-season rivalries.
SPORTS
November 27, 1999 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The National Hockey League Players' Association has filed a grievance on behalf of Ottawa Senators holdout center Alexei Yashin, the Ottawa Sun said yesterday. The paper said the association has asked an independent arbitrator to rule on whether Yashin would be a restricted free agent next summer if he does not honor the final year of his contract. The Senators insist that Yashin will have to play for them next season at his current $3.6 million salary. Association head Bob Goodenow told the Toronto Sun that Yashin should become a restricted free agent at the end of the season, even if he does not honor the deal.
SPORTS
November 20, 1996 | by Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Writer
Now that Lou Holtz finally has announced he will step down as Notre Dame football coach at the conclusion of his 11th season, the speculation turns to his successor. Athletic director Mike Wadsworth and the Rev. William Beauchamp, the school's executive vice president, will recommend a successor to the Rev. Edward Malloy, university president, who will give his final approval. You'll know they have reached a decision when white smoke rises above Touchdown Jesus. Wadsworth said yesterday he will consider just a half-dozen candidates.
SPORTS
February 28, 1996 | Daily News Wire Services
Ronnie Fields, one of the nation's top prep basketball stars, is expected to make a full recovery from a neck fracture sustained in a car accident, his doctor said after a three-hour operation in Chicago yesterday. Fields, who turns 19 today, had bone fragments from his pelvis fused with three vertebrae in his neck, Dr. Paul Meyer of Northwestern Memorial Hospital said. A halo-shaped brace was embedded into Fields's skull and attached to a vest around his chest and back to restrict his movement.
SPORTS
December 11, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Federal investigators are trying to determine if some of baseball's greatest hitters failed to report income generated at autograph sessions. According to reports, promoters William J.F. Hongach and Michael Bertolini, who ran a 1989 baseball show in Atlantic City that featured 11 sluggers, have testified they made payments in cash. "I paid them moneys in the form of cash with the understanding that it wouldn't be reported to the IRS," Bertolini said in an Oct. 28 plea statement.
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NEWS
October 13, 2012 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It looked like a risky move at the time, when Bill O'Brien decided to resign as offensive coordinator of the New England Patriots, a perennial NFL contender, and become the successor to the iconic Joe Paterno to lead a Penn State program rocked by shame and scandal. So much has happened since O'Brien accepted his new post on that cold, early January day: former Penn State assistant Jerry Sandusky's trial and conviction on 45 counts of child sexual abuse; Paterno's death from lung cancer; the Freeh report critical of Paterno and university officials for not acting decisively to stop Sandusky; and severe NCAA sanctions designed to affect the team through the 2017 season.
SPORTS
December 2, 2004 | Daily News Wire Services
Tyrone Willingham blamed himself yesterday for his firing as Notre Dame coach, saying he failed to meet the school's expectations of producing an elite team. But Willingham, whose 3-year tenure was the shortest of any non-interim coach at the school in 70 years, wouldn't say whether he was given enough time to turn the storied program back into a football power. "I don't get into what's fair and what's not fair. I am an optimist by nature, but I am also a realist, and that makes you deal with the events as they occur," he said.
SPORTS
December 2, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
A federal judge in San Francisco said yesterday that she would not immediately dismiss charges against four men accused of distributing steroids to top athletes. The ruling by Judge Susan Illston came in a case that has cast a cloud of suspicion over records set by Barry Bonds and other athletes in recent years. Her decision was in response to accusations that prosecutors illegally searched a nutritional supplement laboratory and the house and car of the trainer for Bonds.
SPORTS
November 13, 2004 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Penn State coach Joe Paterno and Indiana coach Gerry DiNardo are a couple of guys from Brooklyn, so it would seem more appropriate if they discussed their football-related problems on a street corner rather than the plastic turf of Memorial Stadium, where their teams will meet today in a Big Ten Conference game that will bring the Nittany Lions' miserable season one week closer to a merciful conclusion. DiNardo can lift Paterno's spirits by telling him the Hoosiers' porous defense could be the cure for a Penn State offense that has found the opponents' end zone only four times in the last six games, all conference losses, and is ranked 113th out of 117 Division 1-A teams in scoring.
SPORTS
July 24, 2003 | By Ray Parrillo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Big Ten Conference commissioner Jim Delany estimated that a league championship game in football would generate $10 million to $15 million, a sum that could ease the strain on universities struggling to meet their growing athletic budgets. But would it be worth it? Judging from responses by coaches yesterday at the annual Big Ten media session, the answer is no. Among the reasons given: Such a game would add to the academic burden on players, make it more difficult for their teams to qualify for the national championship game, and take the luster off some of the conference's storied late-season rivalries.
SPORTS
January 9, 2002 | Daily News Wire Services
William "The Refrigerator" Perry will make his pro boxing debut Feb. 2 against Eric "Butterbean" Esch. Perry is 39, Esch 35. The fight will take place at the Grand Casino in Gulfport, Miss., the casino announced. Perry, the popular former NFL defensive tackle, became a household name during his rookie year with the Chicago Bears in 1985. He went on to play for the Eagles in 1993 and '94. In other boxing news: It appears the long-awaited bout between Oscar De La Hoya and Fernando Vargas for the WBC and WBA junior middleweight championships will be held May 4 in Las Vegas.
SPORTS
January 9, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Ron Zook, defensive coordinator of the New Orleans Saints and a former assistant coach at Florida under Steve Spurrier, will be introduced today as the Gators' new football coach, the Orlando Sentinel reported. Sources said Zook will get a five-year deal estimated at $1.5 million per season. Florida's first two choices were Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops and Denver Broncos coach Mike Shanahan. Reached at his New Orleans-area home last night, Zook, 47, said he could not confirm that he had accepted the job. The San Jose Mercury News reported that Florida assistant Buddy Teevens, 45, would be introduced at a Stanford news conference today as the successor to Tyrone Willingham, who left for the Notre Dame job. Former Louisiana State and Vanderbilt coach Gerry DiNardo became Indiana's football coach, a month after Cam Cameron's firing.
SPORTS
January 8, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Bob Stoops has decided to stay as Oklahoma's football coach, ending speculation that he would replace Steve Spurrier at Florida. Spurrier resigned Friday to pursue an NFL job. Stoops met briefly with Florida athletic director Jeremy Foley yesterday in Norman, Okla., and told him of his decision. Foley then left for Colorado, where he met with Denver Broncos coach Mike Shanahan, now the leading contender for the Florida job. Penn State coach Joe Paterno, who has more major-college wins than any other football coach in history, will receive the Amos Alonzo Stagg award today during the American Football Coaches Association convention in San Antonio, Texas.
SPORTS
February 7, 2001 | by Bernard Fernandez, Daily News Sports Writer
When Louisiana State hired Nick Saban away from Michigan State after the 1999 season, with a five-year contract averaging $1.2 million annually, it wasn't just because the Southeastern Conference school liked the way he charted X's and O's. In Saban, the Tigers knew they were getting a premier recruiter. Saban provided an instant return on LSU's substantial investment last season as the Tigers, 3-8 in 1999, their final season under Gerry DiNardo, went 8-4, including an impressive 28-14 Peach Bowl victory over favored Georgia Tech.
NEWS
September 11, 2000 | By Gilbert M. Gaul and Frank Fitzpatrick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Beechcraft turboprop jet sped down the runway and rapidly climbed into the Louisiana sky, banking west toward Dallas. Hours earlier, Louisiana State University Chancellor Mark A. Emmert had fired the school's football coach, Gerry DiNardo, after back-to-back losing seasons. Now, seated comfortably in a $3 million, nine-seat plane owned by LSU boosters, Emmert was on a mission: He was looking to hire a new coach. Ordinarily, a university chancellor wouldn't have gotten so deeply involved in such a search, but students and boosters at football-crazed LSU were desperate to win. The school had gone through seven head coaches in 19 years, posting only a handful of winning seasons.
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