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Gerry Mulligan

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1991 | By Nels Nelson, Daily News Jazz Columnist
It's about time somebody produced a whole book about Gerry Mulligan, the titan of the baritone saxophone who began his professional career in Philadelphia three years short of half a century ago and became one of the truly singular voices in jazz. Such a book has now appeared. Published by Schirmer Books at $24.95, it bears the ungainly title of "Listen: Gerry Mulligan - an Aural Narrative in Jazz. " It is neither biography nor discography - nor even bio-discography. I guess its closest kin in the taxonomy of jazz literature is "Milestones," the two-volume set on Miles Davis sired in 1983 by Jack Chambers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1997 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A picture is worth a mere thousand words. But A Great Day in Harlem, a moving picture about the making of a 1958 photograph of all the living jazz greats, is worth a million stories. When Esquire photographer Art Kane assembled jazz legends one Sunday morning in front of a Harlem brownstone, he didn't realize he was calling a historic convention. As with the best jazz, Kane made the most of serendipity and improvisation, and the documentary inspired by his photo is affectionate, gossipy - and it swings.
NEWS
November 25, 1987 | By Ann Kolson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Their contributions range from opera (Anna Moffo) to pop (Frankie Avalon) to classical (Samuel Barber) to jazz (Gerry Mulligan). Among them are gospel singers (Clara Ward), conductors (Eugene Ormandy) and crooners (Eddie Fisher). They are the 41 nominees to Philadelphia's Walk of Fame/Hall of Fame for 1988, announced yesterday by the Philadelphia Music Foundation. Of those 41, 10 will be inducted into the Walk of Fame in front of the Academy of Music on March 31 at noon and then will be inducted into the Hall of Fame during an awards dinner at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel.
NEWS
October 17, 2006 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John J. Keenan, 75, of Bryn Mawr, professor emeritus of English at La Salle University, died Saturday of cancer at Bryn Mawr Terrace. Professor Keenan taught English at La Salle for 36 years. He chaired the English department for seven years. In 1968 he received the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. "He was an engaging and challenging teacher and the epitome of what it means to be part of La Salle University," said his former student and La Salle president, Brother Michael McGinniss.
NEWS
August 17, 1992 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
To hear Pete Souders tell it, he missed being a preacher by the skin of his teeth. Souders is the proprietor, talent coordinator and resident tenor saxophonist of a Northern Liberties saloon named Ortlieb's Jazzhaus, and how he escaped not only the cloth but a lucrative career in computer science is the nub of this instructive life's adventure for the '90s. This lanky, blond, somewhat self-effacing fellow of Teutonic ancestry would indeed look perfectly at home in the pulpit of a Lutheran church.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1993 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As a young man in Philadelphia - where he moved with his family at age 16 and then graduated from West Catholic High School - Gerry Mulligan was not really serious about the saxophone. He had all the horns - the tenor, alto, baritone and so on, and it would be established soon enough that he was highly skilled on these instruments - but playing wasn't his main love at the time. "I just didn't think much about the saxophone back then," said Mulligan, who will perform on a bill with Ahmad Jamal at Glenside's Keswick Theatre in Sunday night's finale of the Mellon PSFS Jazz Festival.
NEWS
May 28, 2010
By Paul Jablow I don't recall whether I told my friend Ted about the Hank Jones concert in New York or whether he told me. (Such lapses occur more and more these days.) But I do recall what I said next: "I have to go. I think it's going to be my last chance to see him. " The two of us went, and it was wonderful. That was about three years ago. Not long afterward, Jones stopped playing because of poor health. This month, he died at the age of 91. Jones was a marvelous pianist, and one of the last of the jazzmen - and jazzwomen - who have enriched my life over the decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1993 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lionel Hampton is somewhere between 80 and 85, depending on which source you put your trust in. Hampton himself contributes nothing to clearing up the matter. "I'm old enough to know better," he said when the question of age was put to him. Whatever, Hampton is still "trying to make it . . . aiming straight ahead. " He's not interested in taking it easy at this stage of his life. Oh, sure, there was a little setback about a year ago. "Yeah, they had me grounded," Hampton said on the phone from his New York apartment a few days before bringing his 17-piece band to Glenside's Keswick Theatre for a concert Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2006 | By SHAUN BRADY For the Daily News
From the diversity of sounds that emanate from his kit, Ari Hoenig's latest CD, "Inversations," could almost serve as a sonic resum? - if that wasn't rendered unnecessary by the fact that the Philadelphia-born drummer is already one of the most in-demand sidemen on the New York jazz scene. The Mount Airy native has played with names like Joe Lovano, Joshua Redman, Gerry Mulligan, Pat Metheny and Wynton Marsalis. "Who doesn't like to feel wanted?" posed Hoenig from Vermont, enjoying some holiday down time after a two-week tour of Italy and shortly before returning to New York to resume his packed schedule.
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SPORTS
December 1, 2011
Observations, Insinuations, Ruminations and unvarnished opinions . . .   'MY FUNNY Valentine" is one of the great standards of our rich popular-music culture. The timeless Rodgers and Hart classic has been performed by every major artist, vocally by the likes of Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, Linda Ronstadt, Billy Eckstine - even actress Michelle Pfeiffer crooned it in "The Fabulous Baker Boys. " But its real staying power and endless musical possibilities have been interpreted by just about every jazz great from boppers Miles Davis, Chet Baker and Gerry Mulligan to smooth-jazz star Chris Botti . . . "My Funny Valentine" ceased to be funny to the rest of the American League East yesterday when the Boston Red Sox segued from the final dysfunctional season of unfocused manager Terry Francona to the brilliant baseball mind and firm hand of Bobby Valentine.
NEWS
May 28, 2010 | By Paul Jablow
I don't recall whether I told my friend Ted about the Hank Jones concert in New York or whether he told me. (Such lapses occur more and more these days.) But I do recall what I said next: "I have to go. I think it's going to be my last chance to see him. " The two of us went, and it was wonderful. That was about three years ago. Not long afterward, Jones stopped playing because of poor health. This month, he died at the age of 91. Jones was a marvelous pianist, and one of the last of the jazzmen - and jazzwomen - who have enriched my life over the decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2006 | By SHAUN BRADY For the Daily News
From the diversity of sounds that emanate from his kit, Ari Hoenig's latest CD, "Inversations," could almost serve as a sonic resum? - if that wasn't rendered unnecessary by the fact that the Philadelphia-born drummer is already one of the most in-demand sidemen on the New York jazz scene. The Mount Airy native has played with names like Joe Lovano, Joshua Redman, Gerry Mulligan, Pat Metheny and Wynton Marsalis. "Who doesn't like to feel wanted?" posed Hoenig from Vermont, enjoying some holiday down time after a two-week tour of Italy and shortly before returning to New York to resume his packed schedule.
NEWS
October 17, 2006 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John J. Keenan, 75, of Bryn Mawr, professor emeritus of English at La Salle University, died Saturday of cancer at Bryn Mawr Terrace. Professor Keenan taught English at La Salle for 36 years. He chaired the English department for seven years. In 1968 he received the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching. "He was an engaging and challenging teacher and the epitome of what it means to be part of La Salle University," said his former student and La Salle president, Brother Michael McGinniss.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1997 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A picture is worth a mere thousand words. But A Great Day in Harlem, a moving picture about the making of a 1958 photograph of all the living jazz greats, is worth a million stories. When Esquire photographer Art Kane assembled jazz legends one Sunday morning in front of a Harlem brownstone, he didn't realize he was calling a historic convention. As with the best jazz, Kane made the most of serendipity and improvisation, and the documentary inspired by his photo is affectionate, gossipy - and it swings.
NEWS
January 25, 1996 | By John Keenan
It was late in the afternoon in the auditorium of the old West Catholic High at 49th and Chestnut. The year was 1945, and the school dance band, "the Sirens," was rehearsing. I was a wide-eyed freshman, a novice clarinet and saxophone player, whose greatest dream was to someday play in a band like this one. A tall, thin red-headed boy came in and began to fool around laughingly with the other players. He sat down and played with the sax section for a while, but the next time I looked he was playing trumpet.
NEWS
November 26, 1995 | By Richard Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the fraction of a second that it takes for a camera shutter to close, bebop was back yesterday. So was the beret. They were probably perched atop more heads on North 33d Street than anyplace else west of the Champs-Elysees. The lingo came back, too. A "cat" wasn't just the Felix variety anymore. And people could call each other "baby" without fear of being labeled politically incorrect or worse. So it was yesterday morning when 175 of the Philadelphia area's best-known jazz musicians gathered in front of the rowhouse where John Coltrane once lived for a photograph to honor him and the city's contributions to the art form.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1993 | By Jack Lloyd, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lionel Hampton is somewhere between 80 and 85, depending on which source you put your trust in. Hampton himself contributes nothing to clearing up the matter. "I'm old enough to know better," he said when the question of age was put to him. Whatever, Hampton is still "trying to make it . . . aiming straight ahead. " He's not interested in taking it easy at this stage of his life. Oh, sure, there was a little setback about a year ago. "Yeah, they had me grounded," Hampton said on the phone from his New York apartment a few days before bringing his 17-piece band to Glenside's Keswick Theatre for a concert Saturday.
NEWS
November 9, 1993 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Robert M. Gallagher, an advertising salesman for the Daily News and Inquirer for nearly 30 years, died Saturday. He was 66 and lived in Roslyn, Montgomery County. Gallagher, who worked for the Daily News for 22 years and six for the Inquirer, retired in 1991. He was widely regarded as a successful salesman because he liked people and he liked the product he was selling. Gene Williams, executive vice president of the Charlotte Observer, in Charlotte, N.C., and a former supervisor of Gallagher's, said he could never forget "his wit and his dogged persistence . . . He was an outstanding salesman and he brought a great deal of humor to the office.
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