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NEWS
November 9, 1988 | By JOSEPH BAMBERGER
Kristallnacht - Crystal Night - the night hundreds of German and Austrian synagogues were ruthlessly assaulted by Nazis, occurred 50 years ago today. Many who lived through that sleepless night remember the terrible sounds of shattered glass as the beautiful stained-glass windows of synagogues were smashed. Others remember the flames. But the thing I remember most vividly, as a 10-year-old boy, was the clomping of two Gestapo men's hard leather boots against the wooden floors of our Hamburg apartment.
NEWS
April 8, 1987 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
It was a coincidence at last week's Academy Awards that the two major contenders for best foreign-language film addressed, in very different ways, the decline of western civilization. In a lighter mode, Denys Arcand's Decline of the American Empire argued that in times of decadence and lost purpose, people seek refuge in personal gratification. Fons Rademakers' The Assault, which took the Oscar in a rare outburst of justice within the foreign division, offers an infinitely more sobering and Olympian view of the course of our century.
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Say what you will about Pennsylvania's Tom Corbett, and plenty of people have, at least he's not known as "Governor Flintstone. " That would be Maine's Paul LePage, a fellow Republican that national pundits have listed alongside Corbett as an incumbent governor likely to lose in 2014. "Dead men walking," Politico recently called the two. And there are some similarities. Both have underwater approval ratings, and each has a frosty relationship with his legislature. But LePage, a bedrock tea party warrior, has earned his Stone Age nickname with a hard-edged and sometimes vulgar approach to politics that makes Corbett seem like a cuddly and softspoken centrist.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Willy Herbst, 93, of Philadelphia, a Holocaust survivor who later helped free prisoners from the Dachau concentration camp, died Tuesday, March 10, of complications from a hip fracture at the Hearth at Drexel in Bala Cynwyd. Mr. Herbst was born in Zaberfeld, Germany, and trained as a baker in Heidelberg. In 1939, at 18, he was among the Jewish men sent to the Paderborn concentration camp by the Nazis to perform forced labor. According to an oral history Mr. Herbst gave the Jewish Virtual Library, he collapsed while being marched to a quarry in late 1939.
NEWS
December 4, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Dramatic irony" is the device whereby the audience at a play or film knows more than a character - a woman blithely chatting on the phone, for example, when we know she is about to be a murder target. I can think of no film more fitting of the term than "The Wansee Conference," an 85-minute drama from West Germany that opens today at the Roxy Screening Rooms. The film's length is significant. It is a recreation, based on documents unearthed by its producer, Manfred Korytowski, of an actual meeting that took place on a winter's day in 1942 in the Berlin suburb of Wansee.
NEWS
July 10, 2012
Texas refuses key health-care items LOS ANGELES - Texas turned down an expansion of Medicaid coverage and said it would not create a state-run health-care insurance exchange. In a letter to U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius released Monday, Texas Gov. Rick Perry laid out his objections. "I will not be party to socializing health care," said Perry, whose bid for the GOP presidential nomination fell flat this year, "and bankrupting my state in direct contradiction to our Constitution and our founding principles of limited government.
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CANBERRA, Australia - Australian Nancy Wake, who as a spy became one the Allies' most decorated servicewomen for her role in the French Resistance during World War II, died in London Sunday, officials said yesterday. She was 98. Trained by British intelligence in espionage and sabotage, Wake helped to arm and lead 7,000 Resistance fighters in weakening German defenses before the D-Day invasion in the last months of the war. While distributing weapons, money and code books in Nazi-occupied France, she evaded capture many times and reached the top of the Gestapo's wanted list, according to her biographer, Peter FitzSimons.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ole Christian Madsen, the Danish director of the exquisitely shot, exciting World War II film Flame & Citron , knows his Hollywood. Set in Nazi-occupied Copenhagen during the final years of the war, Flame is a terrific, if sometimes monotonous, real-life thriller about two members of the Holger Danske resistance movement whose heroism earned them each a posthumous Medal of Honor. With its moody, noir lighting and poetic voice-over, Flame rehearses virtually every element of the classic genre piece: violence, sex and romance, gunplay, spies, betrayals, a femme fatale, and a murderous Gestapo officer.
NEWS
June 7, 1989 | BY JACK MCKINNEY
It's been three weeks since the arrest of France's last major war criminal, Paul Touvier. Despite some predictions of a cover-up after Touvier was found living in a monastery near Nice, however, there's nothing conspiratorial about the story's quick fade from the U.S. press. Records of Touvier's crimes as intelligence chief of the French Militia in Lyon go back at least 45 years. But media interest has been consumed of late by the more immediate issues of state terrorism in China, an electoral revolution in Poland and the death of an aged tyrant in Iran.
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NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Willy Herbst, 93, of Philadelphia, a Holocaust survivor who later helped free prisoners from the Dachau concentration camp, died Tuesday, March 10, of complications from a hip fracture at the Hearth at Drexel in Bala Cynwyd. Mr. Herbst was born in Zaberfeld, Germany, and trained as a baker in Heidelberg. In 1939, at 18, he was among the Jewish men sent to the Paderborn concentration camp by the Nazis to perform forced labor. According to an oral history Mr. Herbst gave the Jewish Virtual Library, he collapsed while being marched to a quarry in late 1939.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Few TV shows have caused such heated debate in Germany as last year's Generation War , a three-part, 279-minute mini-series about WWII that aired on the nation's public TV network. Distinguished by solid acting, high production values, and slick editing, the story follows five young friends as they travel very different paths through Germany from 1941, when the Nazis were at the height of their power, to the war's disastrous aftermath. The story is narrated by the group's idealist, Wilhelm, an infantry lieutenant with a promising military career who fights out of a sense of duty, not ideology.
NEWS
May 2, 2014
WELCOME TO Wonderland, home of Brotherly Love, Sisterly Affection and kowtowing to criminals - alleged, convicted, foreign and domestic. We start with a rogues' gallery of Philly cops who were videotaped with their hands in the cookie jars (or down women's pants) who didn't seem quite guilty enough for our D.A. to prosecute. (After an uproar, he is reviewing claims women were groped.) That's domestic. From abroad, we have "immigrants" (which is what language-abusing apologists call them, foreswearing the precedent "illegal")
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Say what you will about Pennsylvania's Tom Corbett, and plenty of people have, at least he's not known as "Governor Flintstone. " That would be Maine's Paul LePage, a fellow Republican that national pundits have listed alongside Corbett as an incumbent governor likely to lose in 2014. "Dead men walking," Politico recently called the two. And there are some similarities. Both have underwater approval ratings, and each has a frosty relationship with his legislature. But LePage, a bedrock tea party warrior, has earned his Stone Age nickname with a hard-edged and sometimes vulgar approach to politics that makes Corbett seem like a cuddly and softspoken centrist.
NEWS
July 10, 2012
Texas refuses key health-care items LOS ANGELES - Texas turned down an expansion of Medicaid coverage and said it would not create a state-run health-care insurance exchange. In a letter to U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius released Monday, Texas Gov. Rick Perry laid out his objections. "I will not be party to socializing health care," said Perry, whose bid for the GOP presidential nomination fell flat this year, "and bankrupting my state in direct contradiction to our Constitution and our founding principles of limited government.
NEWS
August 9, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CANBERRA, Australia - Australian Nancy Wake, who as a spy became one the Allies' most decorated servicewomen for her role in the French Resistance during World War II, died in London Sunday, officials said yesterday. She was 98. Trained by British intelligence in espionage and sabotage, Wake helped to arm and lead 7,000 Resistance fighters in weakening German defenses before the D-Day invasion in the last months of the war. While distributing weapons, money and code books in Nazi-occupied France, she evaded capture many times and reached the top of the Gestapo's wanted list, according to her biographer, Peter FitzSimons.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ole Christian Madsen, the Danish director of the exquisitely shot, exciting World War II film Flame & Citron, knows his Hollywood. Set in Nazi-occupied Copenhagen during the final years of the war, Flame is a terrific, if sometimes monotonous, real-life thriller about two members of the Holger Danske resistance movement whose heroism earned them each a posthumous Medal of Honor. With its moody, noir lighting and poetic voice-over, Flame rehearses virtually every element of the classic genre piece: violence, sex and romance, gunplay, spies, betrayals, a femme fatale, and a murderous Gestapo officer.
NEWS
February 11, 2007 | By Mark Fazlollah and Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
In 1999, all over Pennsylvania, thousands of people strapped for cash lined up at the storefront offices of a short-term loan company. They got money, fast, from a bank called Crusader, headed by a self-made millionaire named Tom Knox. The loans averaged $250 apiece. But the interest was so steep that community activists cried foul, and federal regulators zeroed in on the bank. Eighteen months after it began making these so-called payday loans, Crusader, under pressure from regulators, agreed to stop.
NEWS
September 3, 1999 | By Deirdre Shaw, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Mayor Paula M. Brown said yesterday that she had suspended Police Chief Robert F. Smythe without pay until Oct. 6, saying he defied her order to keep her informed of Police Department activities when he asked state police to attend Wednesday night's council meeting. Two residents nearly came to blows at the meeting, but were restrained with help from a state officer, and the borough solicitor's Mercedes-Benz convertible was afterward found vandalized. Police from Darby and at least two surrounding towns also responded.
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