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NEWS
July 8, 1993 | For The Inquirer / ROGER TUNIS
Not all of the local Civil War re-enactors went to Gettysburg to mark the 130th anniversary of the famous battle of July 1863. One group went to Montgomery Cemetery in Norristown to visit the graves of four area Civil War heroes: William Bainbridge, Samuel Selah, Samuel Zook and Winfield Scott Hancock. Selah, Zook and Hancock all fought at Gettysburg; Selah and Zook died there.
NEWS
May 12, 2013
Gettysburg also will be the topic for historians Ted Widmer, Sean Wilentz, Carla Petersen, and Adam Goodheart at 6:30 p.m. June 17 at the National Constitution Center. At the Rosenbach Museum and Library an exhibit called "Voices of 1863 - Witnesses to the Civil War" reports on the year's events through the letters and dispatches of President Lincoln, Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, and others. The event extends through Jan. 5. At Laurel Hill Cemetery, a recreation of the 1868 Decoration Day service of the Grand Army of the Republic will be held at noon on May 26. Bronze markers will be dedicated at the graves of Civil War veterans.
NEWS
April 28, 2010
Since the state Gaming Control Board in 2006 rejected a proposed slots parlor several miles from the Civil War battlefield in Gettysburg, it's hard to see how a full-blown casino just a half-mile south of the hallowed ground is an improvement. Former Conrail chairman David M. LeVan is back with another proposal to build a casino near where thousands of Union and Confederate soldiers fought and died during the pivotal battle. Like his failed bid for a gambling license, LeVan's new proposal has rekindled the dispute between civic leaders, merchants, Civil War buffs, and conservationists over whether gambling can coexist with the historic site.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
One hundred and twenty-five years ago, the Union and Confederate Armies met at the crossroads town of Gettysburg, where they fought the decisive battle of the Civil War. Beginning Friday and continuing through Sunday, thousands of Civil War buffs will stage the most ambitious Civil War re-enactment ever. Today through Monday, The Inquirer will provide reports of this event, including dispatches written as they would have been in those turbulent, fateful days during the summer of 1863.
NEWS
June 11, 2013
Gettysburg: By the Numbers The four-day reenactment, July 4-7, will be held along Table Rock Road north of Gettysburg, at a total cost of $900,000. The event will include: 80,000 spectators including 245 from 18 countries 15,000 reenactors from all 50 states including 300 from 16 countries 1,000 feet of fencing 800 acres of battle grounds and camps 500 reporters from around the world 400 horses Six 6,000-gallon water tankers 2,000 bales of hay 400 workers 300 porta-johns 135 artillery pieces 100 cords of camp firewood $35 for a one day spectator ticket; $90 for all four days.
NEWS
October 8, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Watching "Gettysburg," Ted Turner's epic-length saga of perhaps the most pivotal moment in American history, you can't help wondering . . . Is the Phillies' right-handed platoon better than its left-handed platoon? Why do pitchers walk base-stealers like Otis Nixon when he hits less than .270? Could Dave Hollins and Mitch Williams have a catch without hurting someone? Yes, the mind does wander during "Gettysburg," a sluggish FOUR-HOUR rehash of the famous Civil War battle pitting Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia against the Army of the Potomac, commanded by Gen. George G. Meade, who looks suspiciously like Oscar Goldman from "The Six Million Dollar Man. " As you've probably heard, "Gettysburg" originally was intended for television, and will wind up there eventually as a five-hour mini-series.
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Michael Carolan
A few years ago a distant cousin contacted me with the news that our ancestor was wounded at Gettysburg. I had been seeking a connection ever since I played a soldier at a reenactment 20 years ago. On Aug. 1, 1861, a few months after the war started, Robert Cooey joined the 29th Pennsylvania - an outfit of Philadelphians from neighborhood firehouses. With dark hair and dark eyes, my paternal great-great-grandfather was 5-feet-61/2, a 21-year-old immigrant from Ireland. He thought a few months of military service a fair trade for expedited citizenship.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1994 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
The charge seemed to come out of nowhere and caught video stores unaware. "We were blindsided," said Frank Slugaski of Clark, N.J., a franchise operator of 27 Blockbuster Video stores. "It was totally unexpected. " The sudden attack left a sobering sight in its wake: empty shelves. Slugaski's copies of Gettysburg were gone with the wind, as it were. And the rout wasn't caused by rental customers alone, for whom he had stocked about 400 copies throughout his stores. Surprisingly, some 60 of his customers had bought the video outright - with a price tag of about $90. A similar phenomenon occurred at Movies Unlimited in Philadelphia, where an employee in the Castor Avenue store said he saw four customers walk in within an hour of one another and buy the double-cassette tape soon after its March 16 release.
NEWS
June 5, 1994 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Your run-of-the-mill high school history class doesn't prepare you for the wonders of Michael Shaara's The Killer Angels, the story of the Civil War battle at Gettysburg. This book is a shock: It makes the battle fascinating. I could have listened to my high school teachers blather on forever about how the generals from each side were friends. But it just didn't sink in until Shaara placed me at Gen. Robert E. Lee's side, and I saw him get almost teary over the death of a general - from the other side.
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NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neumann-Goretti fought past Imhotep Charter last week to repeat as District 12 Class AAA boys' basketball champion, but Dhamir "DaDa" Cosby-Roundtree was less than satisfied with his own performance. "I played real timid," the 6-foot-8, 195-pound sophomore center said. "I wasn't mentally prepared. That's unacceptable. " Cosby-Roundtree was considerably more locked in Friday night in a PIAA state opener against District 3's Gettysburg. The sophomore netted 14 points and nine rebounds, including five on offense, as the Saints cruised to a 77-29 victory at Archbishop Ryan.
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - For almost a century, the small, historic stone house on Chambersburg Road has been obscured by the commercial buildings surrounding it. But in 1863, it occupied a prominent position at the epicenter of fighting on Day One of the nation's best-known Civil War battle. That night, it would be seized and used as the headquarters of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. On Tuesday - exactly 151 years after the start of the Battle of Gettysburg - the Civil War Trust will announce the purchase of the four-acre parcel and the restoration of the site to the way it looked in 1863.
NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Ashley Trawick, the dilemma was purely academic. "The hardest thing is coming up with the title of my major," Trawick, 19, told Ruth De Jesus, associate dean of intercultural advancement at Gettysburg College. The sophomore from Southwest Philadelphia is eyeing a mix of developmental psychology and education. First-generation graduates from Philadelphia public high schools like Trawick once faced much bigger obstacles: How to get into college, how to afford it, and once among the largely white student bodies, how to fit in. But with a boost from Philadelphia Futures, a nonprofit that helps inner-city students get into and through college, Trawick is on a free ride at the school.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan and Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writers
GETTYSBURG - One of the enemies at the Gettysburg reenactment did not take sides. The weather - heat and humidity - affected reenactors and spectators alike. But there was help. In a reenactment site that resembles a small city, complete with security, traffic controllers, sanitation crews, and ticket sellers, there were three staffed medical aid stations and an impressive mobile emergency room. As of late Sunday, they had treated about 260, with 19 taken to area hospitals. One of them was evacuated by helicopter Saturday, Miller said.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - One-hundred-fifty years ago last week, the Confederate Army retreated from blood-soaked fields here with their numbers depleted by catastrophic casualties. But in 2013, as visitors, spectators, and reenactors left Gettysburg following a 10-day sesquicentennial celebration, the activities in this rural town were decidedly more positive. Carl Whitehill, a spokesman for the Gettysburg Convention & Visitors Bureau, said total attendance was well over 100,000. A final tally will be unavailable for several weeks, he added.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2013 | By Genaro C. Armas, Associated Press
GETTYSBURG, Pa. - The commemoration of this year's 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg and subsequent events includes amenities that soldiers would have relished 150 years ago. A groomed path to the top of Little Round Top. Expanded cellphone coverage. Dozens of portable toilets. The National Park Service and a cadre of community organizers were well-prepared for the commemoration of the pivotal battle of the American Civil War that cemented this small Pennsylvania town's place in U.S history.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - The sky was streaked with clouds of gun smoke, and fierce Rebel yells pierced the air as a long gray wave of shock troops closed in on the blue-clad soldiers outside Gettysburg. The sight was mesmerizing to Chris Howell, who watched and felt the thunderous exchanges of musket and cannon fire. "You can see pictures and paintings, but it's difficult to imagine," said Howell, 56, part-owner of an aircraft parts company in Rochester, N.Y. "Here we're seeing it live, unfolding in front of us. " On Saturday, a fight that raged across the Klingle Farm on the second day of the Battle of Gettysburg was portrayed by reenactors who thrilled tens of thousands of spectators with the spectacle of 19th-century warfare - flags fluttering, bugles blowing, columns of troops colliding, the land boiling with smoke and fire.
NEWS
July 7, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - There are rows of canvas tents here, thousands of soldiers outfitted in wool, and cast-iron pans set atop campfire enders. When it comes to re-creating the lifestyle of 1863, most reenactors at the 150th Anniversary Reenactment of the Battle of Gettysburg this weekend aren't messing around. But even the event's most fanatical participants will admit it: They're still citizens of 2013. "You try and keep it hidden as much as possible," said Rick Hubbard, 55, from Stafford, Va., filling up his cooler with a bag of ice, a decidedly modern undertaking.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
The most mistaken passage of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address predicted: "The world will little note nor long remember what we say here. ... " Of course, remembering Lincoln's 272 words proved to be far easier than preserving the great battlefield he stood upon. One hundred fifty years after the Civil War's most pivotal and bloody battle, government officials and preservationists have not only expanded the hallowed ground dramatically, from the 17-acre cemetery Lincoln dedicated to the nearly 6,000 historic acres the national park encompasses today.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - Stare hard at a line of soldiers marching to the battlefield reenactments here, and you'll likely spot a ponytail or two tucked under an infantryman's cap. "There are a lot of girl soldiers here," said Courtney Yoder, 17, clad in Union blue. "You just have to look for them. " Hundreds of women did fight incognito in the Civil War, and thousands more supported troops on the home front or at the battlefield, cooking or working for field hospitals and aid societies.
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