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Gettysburg Address

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NEWS
November 19, 1988
Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure. We are met on a great battle field of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as the final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live.
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
WHEN POPE FRANCIS steps in front of Independence Hall in September, he not only will pontificate at the birthplace of the United States of America, he also will speak at the lectern from which President Abraham Lincoln delivered one of the most enduring speeches in our nation's history - the "Gettysburg Address. " Pope Francis will be the first known public figure to use the hallowed lectern since Lincoln gave his famous speech at Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg on Nov. 19, 1863.
NEWS
November 21, 2003 | By RON MANUTO & SEAN PATRICK O'ROURKE
PRESIDENT Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address 140 years ago this week. Although one of the shortest speeches in our history, it is one that continues to instruct, challenge and provoke - even today. On July 3, 1863, 50,000 men, wounded and dead, lay scattered outside a small town in Pennsylvania. The Civil War had brought the nation to its knees in a three-day battle. It was a catastrophe in the ugliest kind of war, a civil war. The rot and stench of the battlefield was inconceivable to those who walked among the dead and wounded.
NEWS
August 6, 1992 | By GEORGE F. WILL
"France," wrote F. Scott Fitzgerald, "was a land, England was a people, but America, having about it that quality of the idea, was harder to utter. " Garry Wills, in his new book, Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words That Remade America, says Lincoln uttered it in 272 words. By doing so, Wills argues, Lincoln finished the long founding of the United States. He made this a nation defined by the idea - "dedicated to the proposition" - that all men are created equal. It is, surely, no accident that Wills' book about the most potent presidential rhetoric in American history has become a best seller in this political season.
SPORTS
September 29, 2015 | Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Columnist
THERE ARE bound to be countless stories emanating from the pope's weekend visit. Most figure to last a lifetime. So why shouldn't one of them involve golf? It seems his holiness needed a way to get around the grounds at St. Charles Seminary, where he stayed during his time here. And it happened that a member of the Union League of Philadelphia, who prefers to remain unnamed, was part of the group responsible for helping bring Pope Francis to Philly. Since that organization recently purchased Torresdale-Frankford Golf Club in the Greater Northeast (now known as the Union League G.C. at Torresdale)
NEWS
March 28, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The only known signature made by President Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg will be sold at auction next week in New York City. The signature, A. Lincoln, is on a page that was part of an autograph book from the dedication of the Gettysburg soldiers' cemetery on Nov. 19, 1863 - the day Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address. Selby Kiffer, a senior vice president at Sotheby's, said yesterday that while photographs, diaries and newspaper accounts document Lincoln's presence at Gettysburg that day, the autographed book leaf is the only surviving item that Lincoln himself handled on that historic day. "It's tangible evidence of his being there," said Kiffer, who handles historical books and manuscripts for Sotheby's, which is holding the sale Thursday.
NEWS
August 31, 2010 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - Nearly 150 years ago, with Confederate troops upon them, Gettysburg citizens united in their support of the Union cause. Today a decidedly uncivil war over a proposed casino a half-mile outside the boundaries of the Gettysburg National Military Park has divided this historic community. Since the casino plan - the second in five years - was unveiled in December, battle lines have hardened and deepened, pitting neighbors, businesses, preservationists, and veterans against one another as the debate has gained national attention.
NEWS
July 3, 2013
By Phillip Price Jr. The attention being paid to Gettysburg this week for the 150th anniversary of the battle is a reminder that our national parks serve as outdoor classrooms, where history comes alive. If we want our children and grandchildren to learn the stories of the Civil War, we must continue to protect and preserve these national treasures. Growing up in Philadelphia, I was told heroic tales about my great-great-grandfather, Gen. George Gordon Meade, colorfully described by some of his troops as that "old goggle-eyed, snapping turtle.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2013 | By Genaro C. Armas, Associated Press
GETTYSBURG, Pa. - The commemoration of this year's 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg and subsequent events includes amenities that soldiers would have relished 150 years ago. A groomed path to the top of Little Round Top. Expanded cellphone coverage. Dozens of portable toilets. The National Park Service and a cadre of community organizers were well-prepared for the commemoration of the pivotal battle of the American Civil War that cemented this small Pennsylvania town's place in U.S history.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* THE ADDRESS. 9 p.m. tomorrow, WHYY12.   KEN BURNS spent years hoping someone would make "The Address. " An intimate, uplifting film about a Vermont boarding school for students with learning disabilities for whom memorizing and reciting Abraham Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address" is a rite of passage, "The Address" struck Burns ("Baseball," "The War") as a great idea - for someone else. "They asked me about 10 years ago to be a judge" at the school's annual competition, said Burns, who lives and works in New Hampshire, not far from the Greenwood School, in Putney, Vt. "And I went and I just wept like a baby.
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SPORTS
September 29, 2015 | Mike Kern, Daily News Sports Columnist
THERE ARE bound to be countless stories emanating from the pope's weekend visit. Most figure to last a lifetime. So why shouldn't one of them involve golf? It seems his holiness needed a way to get around the grounds at St. Charles Seminary, where he stayed during his time here. And it happened that a member of the Union League of Philadelphia, who prefers to remain unnamed, was part of the group responsible for helping bring Pope Francis to Philly. Since that organization recently purchased Torresdale-Frankford Golf Club in the Greater Northeast (now known as the Union League G.C. at Torresdale)
NEWS
August 28, 2015
ONE OF MY favorite movies is "Jurassic Park. " Actually, that's not true. One of my 6-year-old nephew's favorite movies is "Jurassic Park," which means we watch it on a loop, which means that unless I want to engage a therapist, I embrace my inner T. Rex and pretend this was entirely my own idea. Deep breath. Right about the point of my 82nd viewing, it occurred to me that technology can sometimes be a dangerous thing. Resurrecting dinosaurs, assuming that were even possible, is not a great idea when the poor creatures would be coexisting with humans (and truly unfair to the dinos if some of those humans were members of the Kardashian genus)
NEWS
August 10, 2015 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
WHEN POPE FRANCIS steps in front of Independence Hall in September, he not only will pontificate at the birthplace of the United States of America, he also will speak at the lectern from which President Abraham Lincoln delivered one of the most enduring speeches in our nation's history - the "Gettysburg Address. " Pope Francis will be the first known public figure to use the hallowed lectern since Lincoln gave his famous speech at Soldiers' National Cemetery in Gettysburg on Nov. 19, 1863.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Ellen Gray
* THE ADDRESS. 9 p.m. tomorrow, WHYY12.   KEN BURNS spent years hoping someone would make "The Address. " An intimate, uplifting film about a Vermont boarding school for students with learning disabilities for whom memorizing and reciting Abraham Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address" is a rite of passage, "The Address" struck Burns ("Baseball," "The War") as a great idea - for someone else. "They asked me about 10 years ago to be a judge" at the school's annual competition, said Burns, who lives and works in New Hampshire, not far from the Greenwood School, in Putney, Vt. "And I went and I just wept like a baby.
NEWS
January 3, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
There's an unofficial rule in the Pennsylvania General Assembly that freshman legislators don't speak on the floor. Rep. Madeleine Dean doesn't care for that rule. "Why wouldn't we? We don't know if we're going to get to be a sophomore," Dean said. "I'm not a kid. Time's a-wasting. " The Abington Democrat was sworn into the House on May 8, 2012, and made her first floor speech 29 days later, urging fellow legislators to reject a bill on payday lending. "What this legislation really does is make legal steep and grievous interest rates on the very people who can least afford it," she said of House Bill 2191.
NEWS
December 31, 2013
AND NOW . . . (I know you've been waiting for it) . . . my annual confession. Bless me, readers, for I have sinned. I have not on every occasion offered flawless analysis. I have on some occasions gotten facts wrong. So here's a list of lapses from my columns and from my Baer Growls blog during 2013. For penance, I openly share such transgressions and pledge to reduce their number in the coming year. Here we go. Due to my lower-than-low confidence in the Pennsylvania Legislature's ability to do anything and my slightly lower confidence in the political acumen of the incumbent governor, I strongly suggested on multiple occasions that the ham-handed hacks of Harrisburg are incapable of addressing significant issues.
NEWS
November 22, 2013
IN RESPONSE to Stuart Caesar's letter and his comment about JFK being a "conservative Republican," allow me to quote the former president defending liberalism: "If by a 'Liberal' they mean someone who looks ahead and not behind, someone who welcomes new ideas without rigid reactions, someone who cares about the welfare of the people - their health, their housing, their schools, their jobs, their civil rights and their civil liberties - someone who...
NEWS
November 20, 2013
Much as it doubts the power of language while proving the enduring strength of carefully considered words, Lincoln's Gettysburg Address casts individual liberty as inseparable from the collective enterprise of the nation. H.L. Mencken touched on both paradoxes in 1920, suggesting that the address' "pellucid and almost childlike perfection" disguises its "fundamental nonsensicality. " Of Lincoln's argument that thousands of Union soldiers had died at Gettysburg for "government of the people, by the people, for the people," Mencken wrote, "It is difficult to imagine anything more untrue.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2013 | By Genaro C. Armas, Associated Press
GETTYSBURG, Pa. - The commemoration of this year's 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg and subsequent events includes amenities that soldiers would have relished 150 years ago. A groomed path to the top of Little Round Top. Expanded cellphone coverage. Dozens of portable toilets. The National Park Service and a cadre of community organizers were well-prepared for the commemoration of the pivotal battle of the American Civil War that cemented this small Pennsylvania town's place in U.S history.
NEWS
July 6, 2013
The most mistaken passage of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address predicted: "The world will little note nor long remember what we say here. ... " Of course, remembering Lincoln's 272 words proved to be far easier than preserving the great battlefield he stood upon. One hundred fifty years after the Civil War's most pivotal and bloody battle, government officials and preservationists have not only expanded the hallowed ground dramatically, from the 17-acre cemetery Lincoln dedicated to the nearly 6,000 historic acres the national park encompasses today.
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