CollectionsGettysburg College
IN THE NEWS

Gettysburg College

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 1, 2001 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The FBI is investigating a white substance found on a greeting card mailed from central New Jersey to a Gettysburg College student. The student called campus security yesterday morning because she had seen a white residue when she opened the envelope in her dormitory room Tuesday. It was mailed by a friend attending Princeton University. "The substance was on the card inside the envelope," said Mary Dolheimer, a spokeswoman for Gettysburg College. "The fact it was from New Jersey elevated the concern.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gordon A. Haaland, president of the University of New Hampshire since 1984, was named president yesterday of Gettysburg College, a private liberal arts school in Gettysburg, Pa. Haaland, 49, who is to begin his new job in March, replaces Charles E. Glassick, who resigned in May to become a senior fellow and vice president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. "I look forward to the challenge of leading Gettysburg College into the forefront of private higher education," Haaland said in a statement released by college officials.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gettysburg College has received a $475,000 grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts to develop a new model for undergraduate education that emphasizes critical thinking rather than rote learning, school officials announced yesterday. L. Baird Tipson, the school's provost, said the model will likely include a requirement that seniors produce a research paper, work of art, or even a community service project that brings together what they have learned throughout their college careers.
NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Ashley Trawick, the dilemma was purely academic. "The hardest thing is coming up with the title of my major," Trawick, 19, told Ruth De Jesus, associate dean of intercultural advancement at Gettysburg College. The sophomore from Southwest Philadelphia is eyeing a mix of developmental psychology and education. First-generation graduates from Philadelphia public high schools like Trawick once faced much bigger obstacles: How to get into college, how to afford it, and once among the largely white student bodies, how to fit in. But with a boost from Philadelphia Futures, a nonprofit that helps inner-city students get into and through college, Trawick is on a free ride at the school.
NEWS
May 12, 2006 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An impulsive hug could land a student in serious trouble at Gettysburg College, or at least that is the interpretation of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, which yesterday challenged the school to change its "arbitrary and overbroad" sexual misconduct policy. Most colleges have such policies, but Gettysburg's is unusual in identifying "physical contact of a lewd type such as brushing, touching, grabbing, pinching, patting, hugging and kissing" as violations. Gettysburg also requires that verbal consent be given before engaging in sexual conduct, reminiscent of a policy at Antioch College in Ohio that became the butt of late-night television jokes in 1993.
NEWS
November 21, 1996 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brian C. Peterson Jr., the Gettysburg College freshman accused of murdering his girlfriend's newborn son, was expected to turn himself in to authorities today, according to the young man's attorney. A brief statement issued yesterday by the attorney, Joseph A. Hurley, said the surrender likely would be between 9 and 11 a.m. at the federal office building in Wilmington. The surrender would end a nationwide manhunt that began in earnest Tuesday when Newark, Del., police and the Delaware Attorney General's Office issued a federal warrant for Peterson's arrest.
NEWS
May 24, 1995 | By Peter Landry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Civil War general was no stranger to controversy - his men had backed out of the first battle of Bull Run, and he was later given the undesirable task of protecting the conspirators said to have killed President Abraham Lincoln in 1865. One hundred and thirty years later, another controversy involving Brevet Maj. Gen. John Frederick Hartranft has been resolved with an out-of-court settlement among his heirs, Gettysburg College and the National Archives. At issue in the latest dispute was a diary, or "day book," Hartranft kept of the treatment and trial of the 16 people charged in the conspiracy to kill Lincoln in the summer of 1865.
NEWS
August 8, 2016
Kathleen Iannello is associate professor of political science at Gettysburg College I have been teaching courses in American government for more than 25 years. I enjoy getting students interested in and excited about politics. I especially love engaging with them during a presidential election. Their interest is at a high point - most of them voting for the first time. My goal is to pull them into the process and get them hooked on real politics, making them eager to study political science.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry S. Belber II, 88, of Malvern, a custom-home builder who developed several communities in Chester County and on the Main Line, died Thursday, Dec. 25, at Paoli Memorial Hospital from complications of pneumonia. Mr. Belber, known as "Hank," spent six decades in the building business, at first under the tutelage of his father, Edmond, and then as president of Trico Construction, where he was responsible for such communities as Rabbit Run Road and Kings Circle in Malvern, and Sugar Knoll in Devon.
NEWS
March 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Joseph S. Georgiana, 82, of Cherry Hill, head of the board of trustees at the Center for Family Services in Camden from 2000 to 2002, died of cancer Saturday, Feb. 20 at Samaritan HealthCare & Hospice in Mount Holly. The center, among other things, helps in "preventing those at risk from becoming victims of child abuse or neglect," a message on its website states. In 2011, Mr. Georgiana was named an honorary board member of the organization. A lawyer, he joined the board of directors of the Family Counseling Service, a predecessor of the center, in 1983.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 8, 2016
Kathleen Iannello is associate professor of political science at Gettysburg College I have been teaching courses in American government for more than 25 years. I enjoy getting students interested in and excited about politics. I especially love engaging with them during a presidential election. Their interest is at a high point - most of them voting for the first time. My goal is to pull them into the process and get them hooked on real politics, making them eager to study political science.
NEWS
May 2, 2016
Darren Glass is associate professor of mathematics at Gettysburg College I recently saw the film The Man Who Knew Infinity , which was released in many American cities this weekend, and was struck by the beautiful telling of an inspirational story. The film, which stars Jeremy Irons and Dev Patel, is a biography of the mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan, who was born in India at the end of the 19th century. Though he flunked out of college twice, Ramanujan did mathematical research independently while working as a clerk in an accountant's office.
NEWS
March 16, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Joseph S. Georgiana, 82, of Cherry Hill, head of the board of trustees at the Center for Family Services in Camden from 2000 to 2002, died of cancer Saturday, Feb. 20 at Samaritan HealthCare & Hospice in Mount Holly. The center, among other things, helps in "preventing those at risk from becoming victims of child abuse or neglect," a message on its website states. In 2011, Mr. Georgiana was named an honorary board member of the organization. A lawyer, he joined the board of directors of the Family Counseling Service, a predecessor of the center, in 1983.
NEWS
December 21, 2015
Robert R. Garnett is a professor of English at Gettysburg College Seventy-five years ago Monday, F. Scott Fitzgerald was sitting in his lover's apartment in Hollywood, nibbling a chocolate bar and studying the Princeton Alumni Weekly. Suddenly he stood, clutched at the mantel, and fell to the floor, dead. He was 44. "The promise of his brilliant career was never fulfilled," the New York Times' obituary chided - meaning, however, the brilliant start of his career. Alcoholic, often drunk, "a cracked plate," Fitzgerald finished only one novel during his last 15 years.
NEWS
December 15, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Susan Hunsberger Stevenson, 84, of Buckingham, a mother, teacher and field hockey official, died Saturday, Nov. 28, of renal failure at home. Born in Norristown, she grew up on Tooth Acres, the family's farm in Collegeville. Her father, Russell Baily Hunsberger, was a well-known area dentist. After his death, her mother, Jeannette Buckland Hunsberger, donated the farm property as a borough park, now called Hunsberger Woods. Ms. Stevenson graduated from Collegeville-Trappe High School in 1948.
NEWS
June 30, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The stories that Bruce A. Mahon told about combat, when he was an infantry officer during the Korean conflict, "were amazing," his daughter Katharine Krassan said. But one, without a moment of combat, was no less striking. "It was just before the war was about to end," she said, "and the soldiers knew that the war was about to end. " Still, they had to go out on their nightly patrols. One night, Mr. Mahon and his infantrymen "were going down this hill, and the North Koreans were going down the other hill," she said.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry S. Belber II, 88, of Malvern, a custom-home builder who developed several communities in Chester County and on the Main Line, died Thursday, Dec. 25, at Paoli Memorial Hospital from complications of pneumonia. Mr. Belber, known as "Hank," spent six decades in the building business, at first under the tutelage of his father, Edmond, and then as president of Trico Construction, where he was responsible for such communities as Rabbit Run Road and Kings Circle in Malvern, and Sugar Knoll in Devon.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bryn Mawr College, the small private women's school on the Main Line, this week joined a growing number of schools around the country that no longer require the SAT or other standardized test scores for admission. The college instead will rely on high school grades, essays, and other factors - a move officials hope will attract a broader applicant pool. "We know there are students all around the country who, when they see 'test scores,' they see it as a barrier to applying," said Peaches Valdes, Bryn Mawr's director of admissions.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2014
The Greater Philadelphia Alliance for Capital and Technologies has elected Jonathan Brassington , CEO of LiquidHub, its new chairman. The Eastern Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce named Rose Siegel , vice president at National Penn Bank, Abington, and Carolyn Hirsh , director of operations at Lindy Communities, Jenkintown, to its board. Richard L. Scheff , partner and chairman of the Philadelphia law firm Montgomery McCracken, was elected to the board of trustees of Gettysburg College.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert D. Risley Jr., 86, of Souderton, a Philadelphia-area businessman and later a fund-raiser for a business lobbying organization, died Friday, July 4, at Grandview Hospital in Sellersville from complications of heart failure. Mr. Risley spent 25 years in the refractory and chrome-plating industries as a salesman working for E.J. Lavino & Co. in Philadelphia; a local salesman for the A.P. Green Co., based in the Midwest; and a plant manager for the Tibon Plating Co. in Norristown.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|