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NEWS
November 1, 2001 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The FBI is investigating a white substance found on a greeting card mailed from central New Jersey to a Gettysburg College student. The student called campus security yesterday morning because she had seen a white residue when she opened the envelope in her dormitory room Tuesday. It was mailed by a friend attending Princeton University. "The substance was on the card inside the envelope," said Mary Dolheimer, a spokeswoman for Gettysburg College. "The fact it was from New Jersey elevated the concern.
NEWS
December 2, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gordon A. Haaland, president of the University of New Hampshire since 1984, was named president yesterday of Gettysburg College, a private liberal arts school in Gettysburg, Pa. Haaland, 49, who is to begin his new job in March, replaces Charles E. Glassick, who resigned in May to become a senior fellow and vice president of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. "I look forward to the challenge of leading Gettysburg College into the forefront of private higher education," Haaland said in a statement released by college officials.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gettysburg College has received a $475,000 grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts to develop a new model for undergraduate education that emphasizes critical thinking rather than rote learning, school officials announced yesterday. L. Baird Tipson, the school's provost, said the model will likely include a requirement that seniors produce a research paper, work of art, or even a community service project that brings together what they have learned throughout their college careers.
NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Ashley Trawick, the dilemma was purely academic. "The hardest thing is coming up with the title of my major," Trawick, 19, told Ruth De Jesus, associate dean of intercultural advancement at Gettysburg College. The sophomore from Southwest Philadelphia is eyeing a mix of developmental psychology and education. First-generation graduates from Philadelphia public high schools like Trawick once faced much bigger obstacles: How to get into college, how to afford it, and once among the largely white student bodies, how to fit in. But with a boost from Philadelphia Futures, a nonprofit that helps inner-city students get into and through college, Trawick is on a free ride at the school.
NEWS
May 12, 2006 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An impulsive hug could land a student in serious trouble at Gettysburg College, or at least that is the interpretation of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, which yesterday challenged the school to change its "arbitrary and overbroad" sexual misconduct policy. Most colleges have such policies, but Gettysburg's is unusual in identifying "physical contact of a lewd type such as brushing, touching, grabbing, pinching, patting, hugging and kissing" as violations. Gettysburg also requires that verbal consent be given before engaging in sexual conduct, reminiscent of a policy at Antioch College in Ohio that became the butt of late-night television jokes in 1993.
NEWS
November 21, 1996 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brian C. Peterson Jr., the Gettysburg College freshman accused of murdering his girlfriend's newborn son, was expected to turn himself in to authorities today, according to the young man's attorney. A brief statement issued yesterday by the attorney, Joseph A. Hurley, said the surrender likely would be between 9 and 11 a.m. at the federal office building in Wilmington. The surrender would end a nationwide manhunt that began in earnest Tuesday when Newark, Del., police and the Delaware Attorney General's Office issued a federal warrant for Peterson's arrest.
NEWS
May 24, 1995 | By Peter Landry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Civil War general was no stranger to controversy - his men had backed out of the first battle of Bull Run, and he was later given the undesirable task of protecting the conspirators said to have killed President Abraham Lincoln in 1865. One hundred and thirty years later, another controversy involving Brevet Maj. Gen. John Frederick Hartranft has been resolved with an out-of-court settlement among his heirs, Gettysburg College and the National Archives. At issue in the latest dispute was a diary, or "day book," Hartranft kept of the treatment and trial of the 16 people charged in the conspiracy to kill Lincoln in the summer of 1865.
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
October marks the high point of this year's Eisenhower celebrations in his hometown of Gettysburg. Gettysburg College is observing the 100th anniversary of the birth of Dwight D. Eisenhower with an exhibit, "Eisenhower the Painter" at the Art Gallery in Schmucker Memorial Hall, highlighting Ike's more personal side. Landscapes, changes of seasons and portraits were his forte, and he stuck to those themes, sometimes putting figures in his landscapes. He painted about 260 oils, of which 26 are on view here, and he was not afraid to tackle an occasional subject that might daunt professional artists.
NEWS
October 4, 1990 | By John Corcoran, Special to The Inquirer
Marcus Hook was chosen a runner-up for the 1990 Outstanding Pennsylvania Community Award at the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry's annual dinner in Hershey Monday night. The borough was recommended for the award by the Delaware County Chamber of Commerce because of the strides it has made in economic growth and community spirit over the last 10 years, chamber president Jack Holefelder said. By the end of the 1970s the business community in Marcus Hook had eroded to about 32 businesses, half of which were bars, and the town had had problems with a motorcycle gang, Holefelder said.
NEWS
March 5, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nina Williams Hillman, 78, an award-winning teacher and administrator at Temple University from 1976 until she retired in 2006, died of lymphoma on Saturday, Feb. 19, at Temple University Hospital. She was chairman of the biology department from 1984 to 1987, vice provost for the sciences from 1991 to 1994, and director of the College of Science and Technology from 1999 to 2006, according to a resumé supplied by her family. In the 1983-84 academic year, she was one of six Temple faculty members who won a Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching from the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation of Philadelphia.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Henry S. Belber II, 88, of Malvern, a custom-home builder who developed several communities in Chester County and on the Main Line, died Thursday, Dec. 25, at Paoli Memorial Hospital from complications of pneumonia. Mr. Belber, known as "Hank," spent six decades in the building business, at first under the tutelage of his father, Edmond, and then as president of Trico Construction, where he was responsible for such communities as Rabbit Run Road and Kings Circle in Malvern, and Sugar Knoll in Devon.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bryn Mawr College, the small private women's school on the Main Line, this week joined a growing number of schools around the country that no longer require the SAT or other standardized test scores for admission. The college instead will rely on high school grades, essays, and other factors - a move officials hope will attract a broader applicant pool. "We know there are students all around the country who, when they see 'test scores,' they see it as a barrier to applying," said Peaches Valdes, Bryn Mawr's director of admissions.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2014
The Greater Philadelphia Alliance for Capital and Technologies has elected Jonathan Brassington , CEO of LiquidHub, its new chairman. The Eastern Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce named Rose Siegel , vice president at National Penn Bank, Abington, and Carolyn Hirsh , director of operations at Lindy Communities, Jenkintown, to its board. Richard L. Scheff , partner and chairman of the Philadelphia law firm Montgomery McCracken, was elected to the board of trustees of Gettysburg College.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert D. Risley Jr., 86, of Souderton, a Philadelphia-area businessman and later a fund-raiser for a business lobbying organization, died Friday, July 4, at Grandview Hospital in Sellersville from complications of heart failure. Mr. Risley spent 25 years in the refractory and chrome-plating industries as a salesman working for E.J. Lavino & Co. in Philadelphia; a local salesman for the A.P. Green Co., based in the Midwest; and a plant manager for the Tibon Plating Co. in Norristown.
NEWS
December 3, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Ashley Trawick, the dilemma was purely academic. "The hardest thing is coming up with the title of my major," Trawick, 19, told Ruth De Jesus, associate dean of intercultural advancement at Gettysburg College. The sophomore from Southwest Philadelphia is eyeing a mix of developmental psychology and education. First-generation graduates from Philadelphia public high schools like Trawick once faced much bigger obstacles: How to get into college, how to afford it, and once among the largely white student bodies, how to fit in. But with a boost from Philadelphia Futures, a nonprofit that helps inner-city students get into and through college, Trawick is on a free ride at the school.
NEWS
July 4, 2013 | By John Rudy
Standing in the pleasant countryside of Gettysburg in the early summer of 1863, it might not have hit you just how quickly the world was changing. That blissful ignorance might have been doubly powerful if you were a young white student at Pennsylvania College (today's Gettysburg College). For decades, students from Pennsylvania had mingled with their peers from the South at the Gettysburg school. Sons of slave owners studied alongside sons of the commonwealth, cradle of liberty.
SPORTS
May 24, 2013 | BY JOSEPH SANTOLIQUITO, For the Daily News
ERIC GREGG knew exactly what he had brought back to his West Philly home. But everyone looked at it like it was something alien. Was it a tennis racket? A hockey stick? No, it was a lacrosse stick. Gregg had borrowed it to show his parents. That Christmas, Santa brought Gregg his own lacrosse stick. And so Gregg's love for lacrosse began, and later inspired him to introduce inner-city children to the sport. According to several surveys, lacrosse has been one of the nation's fastest-growing team sports for more than a decade, a trend that continued in 2012.
NEWS
July 7, 2012 | By Amy Worden, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Deliver the breaking news of the Battle of Gettysburg to the world in 140 characters or fewer. That's the goal of the first live team-tweeting effort by journalists covering this weekend's annual reenactment of the epic Civil War battle - or at least one pivotal skirmish. Four tweeters, armed with smartphones and recruited from two area newspapers, will deliver minute-by-minute coverage of the reenactment Saturday of the fighting at Devil's Den as part of the battle's 149th-anniversary event.
NEWS
March 5, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nina Williams Hillman, 78, an award-winning teacher and administrator at Temple University from 1976 until she retired in 2006, died of lymphoma on Saturday, Feb. 19, at Temple University Hospital. She was chairman of the biology department from 1984 to 1987, vice provost for the sciences from 1991 to 1994, and director of the College of Science and Technology from 1999 to 2006, according to a resumé supplied by her family. In the 1983-84 academic year, she was one of six Temple faculty members who won a Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching from the Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation of Philadelphia.
NEWS
October 24, 2010 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
GETTYSBURG - Under a full moon, her hoopskirt swishing, Sandy Kime lights her lantern and sets off down the brick-lined sidewalks of this historic town, leading a flock of 16 people. Then she pauses and begins to roll out her collection of ghost stories. Standing across from an old-schoolhouse-turned-field-hospital, she recounts the tale of the wounded Confederate officer's emerging from a second-story window and floating down to what was a cemetery across the street. A little farther along, Kime tells the group how students have witnessed an image of a freezing child known as the Blue Boy, appearing to cling to a dormitory window at Gettysburg College.
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