FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By ANTONIO JAMES Special to the Daily News
Even though it was early in the morning - about 1 or 1:30 a.m. last Wednesday, when our group arrived here - a troupe of African dancers and drummers was waiting to greet us after we got our bags at the airport. Everywhere, I saw and heard the word "Akwaba," which means welcome. And I did, indeed, feel welcome. As the drums pounded and the dancers swayed to the music, I began to feel something that up to that point I had not felt. In Egypt, I had felt that all these people were a part of my family.
SPORTS
May 11, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Trapped under a crush of dead and dying soccer fans in a stadium stairwell in Accra, Ghana, Thomas Akazara gasped for air and began reciting "my last prayer. " Finally, he stuck his head through a railing and was able to breathe. "It was so bad, we couldn't stand it. We just thought we were doomed," the 39-year-old Akazara said from his mattress on a hospital floor yesterday, the day after 126 people were killed in Africa's worst sports disaster. Ghana's government declared three days of national mourning.
NEWS
March 2, 2008 | By Sandra D. Long INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was chilling. Standing in the bowels of Elmina Castle, looking at the Door of No Return, I pictured shackled slaves shuffling through the narrow dungeon exit to the beach and ships set to sail to the New World. Some were branded before being forced out of the fort's dank dungeons. A man on the tour offered a prayer for their souls. Others had left behind wreaths honoring the memories of those who did not survive weeks of cruelty and torture that preceded the arduous trip across the Atlantic Ocean to North and South America.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | By Jennifer Wing, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Borders Books & Music at 1149 Lancaster Ave., Rosemont, will celebrate Ghana with storyteller Sandy Taylor, who has just returned from a trip to Africa, at 11 a.m. Monday. The Upper Merion Cultural Center, at 3000 Valley Forge Circle, is continuing its Members' Exhibition during Gallery hours on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; Wednesday from 1 to 4 p.m.; and Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon. The exhibition ends Oct. 28. Call 610-783-7655 for more information.
SPORTS
June 24, 2010
Now that England, Slovenia and Algeria are in the past, the United States' next opponent will be Ghana, in a second-round game Saturday afternoon (2:30, ABC) in Rustenberg, South Africa. The teams have played once before, in a first-round game during the 2006 World Cup in Nuremburg, Germany. Ghana won the game, 2-1, with Clint Dempsey scoring the only American goal during the tournament. Ghana played that game without its greatest player, Chelsea star Michael Essian, who sat out with a red-card suspension.
TRAVEL
March 28, 2016 | By Jilly Appleheimer, For The Inquirer
I was passing through Ghana, well, not exactly. See, I found myself passing through Africa, and I made a detour through Accra because I had become transfixed by stories I had heard of the coffins. There's this thing about the coffins in Ghana. The subject of death is uncomfortable - that is, to some people. But as an artist and storyteller, I've been fascinated with it since childhood. It is an adventure to a place I cannot see, touch, draw, or photograph. It is unconquered, unfathomable, unrecorded - I want to know what it is. The thought of it is terrifyingly liberating.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
During 28 years in West Africa, the Rev. Eugene E. Grau and his wife, Dorothy, witnessed dramatic political and social changes. They saw the Gold Coast, a colony administered as part of British Togoland, become the independent Republic of Ghana, a nation torn by coups, revolts and economic hardship. But it wasn't until last fall, 15 years after the Graus left Ghana, that they returned and saw the full measure of religious change - change for which they had worked so hard as Evangelical Presbyterian missionaries.
SPORTS
May 10, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
A stampede at a packed soccer match between two of Ghana's leading teams killed at least 100 people last night in Accra, hospital officials said. Accra Hearts was leading, 2-1, against Assante Kotoko with 5 minutes left when Assante supporters began throwing bottles and chairs onto the field. Police responded by firing tear gas, creating panic in the stands as spectators rushed to escape, witnesses said. The injured were rushed to hospitals, where officials said at least 100 people had been killed and many more injured.
NEWS
August 10, 2007 | By ANTONIO JAMES Special to the Daily News
On Monday, the d'Zert Club group had an extremely emotional experience visiting the Elmina and Cape Coast slave dungeons. This was perhaps the most spiritually and emotionally significant part of the trip. We had prepared for this moment by writing letters to our ancestors to remember why we had come here to Africa. We toured the Cape Coast dungeon. The tour guide said the once-hard stones of the floor had been softened by the accumulation of blood, feces and sweat of the slaves.
SPORTS
June 25, 2010 | by Frank Bertucci
What: Second-round World Cup game. When: Tomorrow, 2:30 p.m. Where: Royal Bafokeng Stadium, Rustenberg, South Africa. TV: 6ABC, Univision. Radio: ESPN (950). For kicks: The U.S. won Group C with a win and two ties, with four goals scored, three allowed. Ghana was second in Group D with one win, loss and tie, with two goals scored and allowed . . . Landon Donovan leads the U.S. with two goals; Asamoah Gyan has scored both Ghanian goals, on penalty kicks . . . The teams have played only once before, a 2-1 win by Ghana in the 2006 Cup in Germany . . . From here on, games tied at the end of regulation move on to two 15-minute overtimes (played out; there's no sudden death)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
March 28, 2016 | By Jilly Appleheimer, For The Inquirer
I was passing through Ghana, well, not exactly. See, I found myself passing through Africa, and I made a detour through Accra because I had become transfixed by stories I had heard of the coffins. There's this thing about the coffins in Ghana. The subject of death is uncomfortable - that is, to some people. But as an artist and storyteller, I've been fascinated with it since childhood. It is an adventure to a place I cannot see, touch, draw, or photograph. It is unconquered, unfathomable, unrecorded - I want to know what it is. The thought of it is terrifyingly liberating.
NEWS
November 18, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHENEVER Josephine Johnson traveled to Ghana, she felt that she had gone home. She was always interested in her African heritage - actually from the age of 6 when she searched a Philadelphia library for information about Africa and found very little. Josephine B. Johnson, known to family and friends as "Mom," devoted her life in Philadelphia to powerful civic endeavors, working with prisoners and gangs, housing, education and other issues, fighting nuisance bars and suing Yellow Cab for discriminating in black neighborhoods.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia professors Marcella McCoy-Deh and T.M Giggetts knew they wanted to share in a novel the often contradictory and hectic lifestyle of an adjunct professor, but they had no idea it would become The Search for Susu . Set in Philadelphia and in Accra, Ghana, the novel's main character, Dr. Francine Carty, is an adjunct professor with dreams of becoming a tenured educator, but she struggles to subsist on her meager adjunct-professor wages....
NEWS
August 14, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
HOW MANY PEOPLE living in North Philadelphia knew they were living with royalty? They might have known their neighbors as Franklin and Elvira Gibson, but to the people of Ghana, they were Nana Kofi Yeboah II and Queen Mother Nana Akosua Akyaamaah. The couple had been "enstooled" by the people of Bosofour, Ghana, in 2000, which means they were given the titles of royalty for the many services they rendered to the West African nation. The impressive ceremony had the couple seated on elaborately carved wooden stools while the incantations were entoned.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kwesi Koomson has spent his whole adult life teaching at Westtown School. He met his wife, Melissa, there. This month, the couple quit their jobs with the support of their Quaker school's community to head to a school in a small village in Ghana on the northwest coast of Africa. Koomson, 40, founded Heritage Academy in 2004 in Breman Essiam, the village where he grew up and where his family still lives. Its tin-roof homes are made of cinder blocks, and most of the families in the rural village of about 5,000 earn no more than $2 a day. The Koomsons usually visit twice a year.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Our greatest teachers sometimes appear just when we need them most. So it was for then-twentysomething Angeleno Tavis Smiley, who in 1991 had suffered a loss that ended his career in local L.A. politics. Rudderless, depressed, Smiley found himself, almost despite himself, on a life-altering journey to Africa with one of America's greatest African American artists as his tour guide: Maya Angelou. In his latest book, My Journey with Maya , Smiley, now 50, writes about his 28-year friendship with Angelou.
SPORTS
October 14, 2014 | BY AARON CARTER, Daily News Staff Writer cartera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5814
ERNEST AFLAKPUI might be a native of Ghana, but the 6-8, 225-pound forward for Archbishop Carroll will remain in his home away from home to play college basketball. Yesterday, Aflakpui committed to Temple University, joining an already talented duo of local players who have pledged allegiance to the Owls. "I just felt like I saw everything I needed to see and I felt like this was the right time to make the decision," Aflakpui said via phone from his home in Collegeville. At the end of last month, Haverford School senior guard Levan "Shawn" Alston followed in his dad's footsteps (Shawn Alston)
SPORTS
June 17, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
FINALLY, the talk no longer matters. There have been a lot of dramatic changes in United States soccer since the national team last played a game in the FIFA World Cup in 2010, sparking many discussions about the ever-evolving state of the game in this country and which decisions have been right and wrong in the movement forward. But that all falls to the back burner later this afternoon as the USA takes to the pitch to play Ghana in its opening match of the 2014 World Cup. Actions speak louder than words, and USA manager J├╝rgen Klinsmann and his 22 charges get to make the loudest statement about where they actually are and what they might be capable of accomplishing during this next month in Brazil.
NEWS
May 11, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Villanova students found neither running water nor electricity when they left their Main Line campus last summer for a school in rural Ghana. But what Lauren Colegrove and Andrew Balamaci discovered at Heritage Academy was a student body with a voracious appetite for learning. Their trip last summer was for credit. Their return in July will be personal: They're helping the students create their first school newspaper. "It's the idea of giving these students a voice," said Colegrove, 22, a journalism major from Warrenton, Va. The Villanova University students' journey will deepen a remarkable connection between Heritage, a pre-K-12 private school, and the Philadelphia region that started 10 years ago. The academy was founded by Kwesi Koomson, a Ghanian native, and his wife, Melissa Schoerke Koomson, both educators at Westtown, a Quaker school in West Chester.
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