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Ghost Town

NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By Elisabetta Povoledo, New York Times News Service
ROME - An earthquake struck the northern Italian region of Emilia Romagna on Sunday, killing at least five people, injuring dozens, leaving thousands homeless and damaging historic buildings as well as warehouses and factories, officials said. The earthquake, which the U.S. Geological Survey said had a magnitude of 6.0, crumbled church roofs and Renaissance-era towers, according to Italian television reports. Large cracks riddled apartment blocks in dozens of small towns. And Italy's national Civil Protection Department said that at least 3,000 had been left homeless.
NEWS
February 28, 1988 | By Carl DiOrio, Special to The Inquirer
The Ardmore business district is seeking to regain what it lost about a decade ago - curbside parking along Lancaster Avenue - as part of plans to rejuvenate the busy shopping area. Additional parking is high on the merchants' list and may be forthcoming by next year. The Ardmore Business Association is poised to hire an engineering consultant to make recommendations on architectural improvements and other renovations to the district in Lower Merion Township, according to Bob Grossman, a spokesman for the group.
NEWS
January 19, 1998
I've been going to the Mummers Parade for 20 years, standing at Broad and Pine with about 75-100 people. We enjoy it and we'll never stop going, but when the parade goes by and it's a designated area and all the units walk past it, you start losing interest. If it's a designated performance area, the bands and the brigades should all perform there. Leave the parade outside, but make sure they stop. People aren't going to stand in the cold for six and seven hours, as we do, if people are just going to walk by without playing music or performing.
NEWS
October 7, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR and JOHN C. WHITE, Daily News Staff Writers
Striking Temple University faculty members have picked up a formidable ally: Henry Nicholas, president of the hospital and health-care workers' union. Although the influential leader of District 1199C did not order his members at Temple to join the strike before the faculty union officially asks them, he told them at a meeting last night that if he were a worker at Temple, "I would indeed follow my conscience and not cross the picket line. " Nicholas' union - the National Union Of Hospital & Health Care Employees - represents 800 workers at Temple University Hospital and another 2,200 clerical and maintenance workers at the university.
NEWS
February 28, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
MARCUS HOOK has long been a quintessential company town, joined at the hip with the iconic Philadelphia company Sunoco for more than a century. With imminent closure of Sunoco's refinery there, most of the 590 workers get their last paychecks Wednesday. Now, fear is seeping into in this quaint, tight-knit, working-class burg in Delaware County - fear that it could turn into a modern-day ghost town. When Sunoco said in September that it would dump the last of its remaining refining operations and focus on oil pipelines and fuel retailing, local workers and residents hoped a buyer would emerge for the 110-year-old, 175,000-barrel-per-day refinery.
NEWS
August 2, 2006 | By Ronaldo Empke
What happened to the people of Riverside? Did they lose their minds? Did they mentally move to another country? Because as far as I know, this little township is still part of the Greatest Nation in the World, among whose proud citizens are immigrants from around the world. Did Riverside's entire population forget about the immigrant blood running through its veins? Or did that blood go through their cold hearts and freeze their brains? Instead of trying to solve the problem of illegal immigration with existing codes and laws, Riverside's people decided to come up with a new ordinance - a new order - that just proves their minds are surrounded by a wall of ignorance and lack of humanism.
NEWS
May 27, 2005 | By Nancy Viau
As the days begin to get warmer at the Jersey Shore, year-round residents are not happy. I stroll into one of my favorite stores and announce to my shopkeeper friend, "Summer is just around the corner!" She looks at me and moans, "Oh, no. " "What's wrong?" I ask. "Don't you miss the good ole summertime?" "Well," she sighs, "It's just that those of us who live here dread summer. " I know why she feels this way. Summer at the Shore means crowds galore. Gone are the parking spaces, the empty beaches and the peaceful waterways.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1999 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A touching story from Germany tops this week's list of new movies on video. Beyond Silence (1998) (Miramax) 106 minutes. Sylvie Testud, Tatjana Trieb, Howie Seago, Emmanuelle Laborit. German filmmaker Caroline Link's drama is a compelling, if somewhat conventionally told, tale of a daughter torn between love and loyalty for her deaf parents and a blossoming career in music. Trieb, who plays the protagonist as a child, and Testud, who plays her as a young woman, bring the story to life.
NEWS
March 24, 1991 | By Ovetta Wiggins, Special to The Inquirer
Beverly business leaders have decided that the best way to help themselves is to help their town. That's why last month they reorganized the Beverly Business Association (BBA), an organization that had been defunct for about five years. The BBA members believe that one of the ways to help their economically deprived city is to improve its image to outsiders and to its own residents. "We're still hashing around a lot of ideas, but we want a general sprucing up of the area," said John Schoen, the new chairman of the BBA, "especially on (Warren Street,)
NEWS
December 9, 1991 | BY YOAN H. KIM
Living in this country as an immigrant is a very big challenge. You must adopt a new culture and change your native tongue. But the American government gives long and serious thought in deciding who will benefit here. Now we have a new mayor-elect, along with new administrators and legislators. It is an awesome transition for Philadelphia - hopefully a revolution in the midst of serious financial and ethnic problems. Accepting different cultures, not by political rhetoric but by sincere action, is, I believe and everyone knows, the best method of building up the city.
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