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Ghost Town

NEWS
July 24, 2000 | By Rita Giordano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shortly after Tiger Woods made golfing history yesterday as the youngest player to win a career grand slam with victories in the Masters, U.S. Open, PGA and British Open, the balls started flying at the Long Knockers Golf Club at the Strawberry Mansion Driving Range. So did the pride. Proud to be American. Proud to be black. Proud to be Asian. Proud to be young. Proud to be just a part of the game of golf. "I watched it all. I just think it's incredible how he's head and shoulders over the rest of the field," said Vernon Sweet, 35, a restaurant manager, who said he was only moderately interested in golf before Woods came along.
NEWS
April 13, 2012
RE: Stu Bykofsky's column about his health: I have taken it upon myself as a mission to inform my friends for the last couple of years about going to the ER. If you feel something abnormal, go. It's best to get a battery of tests and get a follow-up referral than not address the feeling at all. Thank you for encouraging the men of our age (I'm 55)! This will save lives! Michael Black Philadelphia In the minority Re: James Lynch's letter about the article on minority contracting: You accuse the article of not offering an explanation for the lack of minority contractors.
NEWS
May 21, 2012 | By Elisabetta Povoledo, New York Times News Service
ROME - An earthquake struck the northern Italian region of Emilia Romagna on Sunday, killing at least five people, injuring dozens, leaving thousands homeless and damaging historic buildings as well as warehouses and factories, officials said. The earthquake, which the U.S. Geological Survey said had a magnitude of 6.0, crumbled church roofs and Renaissance-era towers, according to Italian television reports. Large cracks riddled apartment blocks in dozens of small towns. And Italy's national Civil Protection Department said that at least 3,000 had been left homeless.
NEWS
February 28, 1988 | By Carl DiOrio, Special to The Inquirer
The Ardmore business district is seeking to regain what it lost about a decade ago - curbside parking along Lancaster Avenue - as part of plans to rejuvenate the busy shopping area. Additional parking is high on the merchants' list and may be forthcoming by next year. The Ardmore Business Association is poised to hire an engineering consultant to make recommendations on architectural improvements and other renovations to the district in Lower Merion Township, according to Bob Grossman, a spokesman for the group.
NEWS
January 19, 1998
I've been going to the Mummers Parade for 20 years, standing at Broad and Pine with about 75-100 people. We enjoy it and we'll never stop going, but when the parade goes by and it's a designated area and all the units walk past it, you start losing interest. If it's a designated performance area, the bands and the brigades should all perform there. Leave the parade outside, but make sure they stop. People aren't going to stand in the cold for six and seven hours, as we do, if people are just going to walk by without playing music or performing.
NEWS
October 7, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR and JOHN C. WHITE, Daily News Staff Writers
Striking Temple University faculty members have picked up a formidable ally: Henry Nicholas, president of the hospital and health-care workers' union. Although the influential leader of District 1199C did not order his members at Temple to join the strike before the faculty union officially asks them, he told them at a meeting last night that if he were a worker at Temple, "I would indeed follow my conscience and not cross the picket line. " Nicholas' union - the National Union Of Hospital & Health Care Employees - represents 800 workers at Temple University Hospital and another 2,200 clerical and maintenance workers at the university.
NEWS
February 28, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
MARCUS HOOK has long been a quintessential company town, joined at the hip with the iconic Philadelphia company Sunoco for more than a century. With imminent closure of Sunoco's refinery there, most of the 590 workers get their last paychecks Wednesday. Now, fear is seeping into in this quaint, tight-knit, working-class burg in Delaware County - fear that it could turn into a modern-day ghost town. When Sunoco said in September that it would dump the last of its remaining refining operations and focus on oil pipelines and fuel retailing, local workers and residents hoped a buyer would emerge for the 110-year-old, 175,000-barrel-per-day refinery.
NEWS
June 22, 2015
Desaparecidos Payola (Epitaph ***1/2) Read Music/Speak Spanish , the first Desaparecidos album, came out in 2002. Conor Oberst had taken a break from Bright Eyes to join some friends from Omaha to play loud, pointed punk rock, and the record seethed with Bush-era political venom. The band soon went on hiatus, however, to let Oberst devote himself to other projects, until a few years ago, when a reunion show led to some topical new singles. And now we have Payola , the second Desaparecidos full-length.
NEWS
December 21, 2012 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer| narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
MANTOLOKING, N.J. - The bridge into town looked as if it led to nowhere, arching over a slim waterway before disappearing into darkness. There was no traffic Sunday night, no sign of life except for a few police cars that gave the mist an eerie glow. You couldn't tell, from atop the bridge, where the town ended and the Atlantic Ocean began. But after the bridge curved down into town, past the piles of debris and the house slumped in the shallow water, a large crowd appeared, anxiously staring at a pile of dirt.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph Miele sat in a living-room chair by the front window of his Lower Merion home and waved his hand toward St. Charles Borromeo Seminary across the street. "We've been here since 1954," Miele, 86, said. "All my four boys growing up, we used the grounds for playing ball. " That was years ago. He might have been upset then if there were no open space, "but not now," he said. Miele's serenity is just as well, considering the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's announcement last week that it would sell or lease the 45 acres of the 75-acre campus closest to City Avenue.
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