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Ghost Town

SPORTS
April 29, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
The lockout definitely is thawing, if that isn't too much of a mixed metaphor. Longtime Eagles safety Quintin Mikell, currently a free agent, visited Nova-Care yesterday, Mikell said (and tweeted). He said he spoke briefly with general manager Howie Roseman, at more length with new defensive coordinator Juan Castillo, and even bumped into Andy Reid in the parking lot as Mikell was leaving. "It was cool. It was a little weird, like a ghost town. I don't remember it ever being that quiet," said Mikell, who explained he wanted to fetch some items from his locker.
NEWS
March 21, 2011
By Paul R. Levy Before the Center City District started up 20 years ago today, the downtown area was perceived as dirty and dangerous. While major crimes were not very common, a sense of disorder undermined the confidence of property owners, would-be investors, workers, visitors, and residents. Whirlwinds of litter blew around, broken glass glittered in gutters, and graffiti marred buildings and benches. Thirty-foot-high "cobra head" streetlights created pools of light separated by long stretches of darkness.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010
GIMME FIVE "The Last Song" wasn't a blockbuster, but it was Greg Kinnear's highest-grossing movie in a while. His last five outings: 1. "The Last Song. " (2010) $62 million. 2. "Green Zone. " (2010) $35 million. Plays a Pentagon Special Intelligence officer in Baghdad. 3. "Flash of Genius. " (2008) $4 million. Kinnear takes on Detroit over the invention of intermittent windshield wipers. 4. "Ghost Town. " (2008) $13 million. He's a ghost, meddling in his widow's affairs.
NEWS
May 7, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com215-854-5573
WHEN THOMAS AND BETTY MAPP came home to a house rebuilt by an incompetent, or just plain crooked, contractor in the Osage Avenue neighborhood destroyed in the MOVE debacle, they found cedar siding sliding off the walls and fire spitting out of electrical outlets. But theirs was only one of the many horror stories told by the residents of the once-thriving and close-knit neighborhood near Cobbs Creek Park in West Philadelphia, destroyed in the MOVE confrontation. Insult was added to injury when the city hired a company headed by Ernest A. Edwards Jr. and his partner, Oscar Harris, to rebuild the 61 homes in the 6200 blocks of Osage Avenue and Pine Street.
NEWS
April 18, 2010 | By Emily Tartanella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Scott and Janet Turner pull over at a rest stop and climb off their 2000 Honda Goldwing motorcycle, they're surprised by the looks and remarks they get. "We meet new people all the time," Scott says, "from fellow travelers to local couples, to restaurant owners and more. And the typical response? " 'You're doing that? More power to you!' " Their ages may have something to do with it, though that hasn't stopped Scott, 69, and Janet, 80, from crossing the country on their Honda four times in the last decade.
NEWS
August 13, 2009 | By William Ecenbarger FOR THE INQUIRER
No one's waiting at the Cold Spring Railroad Station just now, and there are no guests at the Cold Spring Hotel. In fact, there hasn't been a train through in more than 100 years. Only the hotel's walls and foundation remain, and the station was leveled 20 years ago by vandals. This is a real, live ghost town - one of several in Stony Creek Valley, a remarkable 19-mile-long strip of wilderness without a single inhabitant or public road that lies just 90 bird-miles from Philadelphia City Hall and within two hours' drive of half of Pennsylvania's 12 million inhabitants.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2008
This distinctive documentary follows Hurricane Katrina survivors Scott Roberts and Kimberly Rivers Roberts, residents of New Orleans' Ninth Ward. Mixing camcorder and hand-held footage with news clips, the film lays bare the unthinkable human toll the 2005 storm took on those too poor or otherwise unable to evacuate the city. The film follows the couple through the storm, huddling in an attic without electricity, and in the months afterward as they become FEMA refugees.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Ghost movies, it seems, are nearly as old as ghosts themselves. But Ghost Town , despite being set in modern-day New York, feels downright ancient. Ostensibly a comedy, but one in which the (normally) brilliantly funny Ricky Gervais is more dull than he is droll, Ghost Town takes a familiar formula and goes nowhere with it. Gervais, affectless and aloof, is Bertram Pincus, a socially challenged Fifth Avenue dentist with a selfish, cynical view of the world. But when he awakens in a hospital room - having been anesthetized for a colonoscopy - Pincus suddenly finds that he can see, and communicate with, the dead.
NEWS
September 18, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
I would have bet that Hollywood would botch the job of finding the right project for offbeat Brit comic Ricky Gervais, but "Ghost Town" proved me wrong. It's a consistently funny comedy that exactly captures Gervais' gift for playing self-centered jerks with a barely visible softer side (if you get a chance to see him in the BBC import "Extras," take it). Gervais plays Bertram Pincus, a misanthropic Manhattan dentist. He gives most people - patients and colleagues included - a look that says "drop dead," which he comes to regret, because it turns out that dead people are even more irksome than the living.
NEWS
August 21, 2006
Below are readers' responses to a "Community Voices" invitation to discuss the impact of illegal immigration on them, and their reactions to articles on a Riverside ordinance that holds businesses and landlords liable for dealing with illegal immigrants. A second installment of letters on this topic will be published tomorrow. As a resident of Riverside I applaud Mayor Charles Hilton's stand on illegal immigration. The town is becoming overcrowded. Ronaldo Empke (Commentary, Aug. 2)
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