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Ghost Town

NEWS
August 4, 2005 | By Terri Akman
It's hard to believe it was 25 years ago that strains of Loggins & Messina's "Danny's Song" accompanied the first dance for my husband and me as man and wife. And is it possible that their rendition of "House at Pooh Corner" lulled my babies to sleep all those years ago? Hearing Kenny Loggins and Jim Messina singing these songs, and more, at the Tweeter Center recently, took me back to these special moments in my life. When friends asked if we wanted to see Loggins and Messina, we thought it would be fun but held out for the cheaper lawn seats.
NEWS
May 27, 2005 | By Nancy Viau
As the days begin to get warmer at the Jersey Shore, year-round residents are not happy. I stroll into one of my favorite stores and announce to my shopkeeper friend, "Summer is just around the corner!" She looks at me and moans, "Oh, no. " "What's wrong?" I ask. "Don't you miss the good ole summertime?" "Well," she sighs, "It's just that those of us who live here dread summer. " I know why she feels this way. Summer at the Shore means crowds galore. Gone are the parking spaces, the empty beaches and the peaceful waterways.
NEWS
September 4, 2004 | By Troy Graham and Anthony R. Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Central Florida, its coastal communities turned into boarded-up ghost towns by the threat of Hurricane Frances, braced for a nightmare today. The National Hurricane Center in Miami forecast that Frances would make landfall as a major hurricane, with winds up to 120 m.p.h., this afternoon and then become a dangerous inland rainstorm. The storm behaved erratically yesterday, and its precise destination remained uncertain, but the forecast track had it landing near or south of Melbourne.
NEWS
July 27, 2004 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Urged to stay away from downtown during the frenzy of the Democratic National Convention, Bostonians did precisely that yesterday. "It's like a ghost town, like there was a mass exodus," said Laura McNally, a waitress at the Harp Irish Pub, located right across from the FleetCenter and separated from it by tall metal barricades. At noon yesterday, instead of serving lunch to her regular dozens of office and construction workers, McNally found herself outside smoking a cigarette, watching the out-of-towners amble by. The same was true at the 5 North Square Italian restaurant in Boston's North End, where lunchtime came and went with just two dishes served, one grilled chicken, one meatball and ziti.
SPORTS
August 7, 2003 | By Frank Fitzpatrick INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During Veterans Stadium's final season, The Inquirer will look back weekly at memorable Phillies moments. Normally, on weekday mid-mornings, Pattison Avenue, just east of Broad Street, is as sleepy as a ghost town - though it's generally litter, not tumbleweeds, that blows along the urban thoroughfare. By then, the commuters who park in the sports complex's vast lots and hop on the Broad Street Subway are tucked away in their Center City offices. The produce-packed vehicles and cement trucks that rumble along this pothole-plagued topography are gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2003 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
If little green aliens popped into the multiplex this summer, they'd surely come away believing Americans to be atrociously bad drivers. Between 2 Fast 2 Furious, The Matrix Reloaded, Terminator 3, and today's Bad Boys II, there's more road rage out there than the Schuylkill Expressway sees in like, um, - OK, forget that. And if little green aliens popped into the multiplex, their eyeballs would glaze over like Krispy Kremes at the sight of those digitally enhanced stunts that make the Hulk leap city blocks and Angels go ballistic with their booties.
NEWS
September 19, 2002 | By Ovetta Wiggins INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It doesn't get much sweeter than this. After the charitable trust that controls Hershey Foods Corp. dropped plans late Tuesday to sell the candy-maker, this company town celebrated. "I really thought I was dreaming," said Lorie Gibson, who heard the announcement Tuesday night as she drifted off to sleep. "I am just so happy right now. " For residents and workers in this small central Pennsylvania town of Derry, it doesn't matter why the trust decided to ditch its plans to sell Hershey Foods.
NEWS
June 28, 2002
Solving problems at the Convention Center Let me make clear that Greater Philadelphia First (GPF) strongly supports expansion of the Pennsylvania Convention Center as critical to its future competitiveness (Editorial, June 23). Without expansion, the Convention Center will soon become known as a midsize, high-cost facility with a limited ability to attract repeat business and future bookings. At risk will be thousands of jobs, as well as the enormous economic benefits the Convention Center was developed to generate and has, in fact, already generated for a broad cross section of Philadelphia area interests.
NEWS
November 26, 2001 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the Taliban marched on this small farm village three years ago, most of the residents fled to a remote hamlet for safety. Sayed Sher Agha stayed behind to collect the last of his family's belongings. The delay saved his life. By the time Agha went to rejoin his family, the Taliban had blocked his path, and he ran away. He never saw the 27 male villagers who sought sanctuary that day, including two brothers, a son, and five other relatives. Yesterday, Agha sank a shovel into a mound of dirt in Qatar Haq, an abandoned village not far from Du Ob. After several shovelfuls of tan soil and rocks, he struck the bones of a human leg and a foot.
NEWS
October 29, 2001
I REALIZE THAT we are going through the most trying times in the history of our country. I realize that we all have much fear in our hearts and deservedly so. However, I feel we are allowing these cowardly bastards get the best of us. Case and point: I reside only a few miles from the Neshaminy Mall right outside of Philadelphia. The mall houses the largest movie theater on the East Coast. This place is always jammed with people. The lines of people are out the door - at least they were until Sept.
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