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Gifted Education

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NEWS
November 19, 2008 | By Del Siegle and Roberta Braverman
Multiple crises are forcing elected officials to focus almost exclusively on near-term challenges, ignoring areas that could lead to more vexing predicaments. Perhaps nowhere is this shortsightedness more apparent than in our nation's disregard for educating our most promising students. While emerging nations are redoubling their investments in their brightest minds, the United States has opted for neglect. Washington invests a pittance in gifted education - about 2.6 cents of every $100 in federal education funds.
NEWS
January 27, 1991 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the eight months since the Cheltenham school board decided to revise the district's gifted-education program, teachers, administrators and parents have been struggling to adjust to the changes. Replacing the district's gifted program, formerly called Challenge, has meant expanded duties for classroom and gifted-education teachers and a gifted-education curriculum that is not as tangible to students and parents. "We are trying to have teachers provide gifted education to gifted children all of the time," said Alice Johnson, the district's director of pupil personnel.
NEWS
March 30, 1997 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A panel reviewing gifted education in the Council Rock School District has good news for students and parents concerned about possible cuts to the program. "The committee strongly recommends the continuation of the current approach," said Don Ernsberger, a Council Rock gifted-education teacher who served on the committee. Details of the panel's report will be made public Thursday in a presentation to the school board, which will then decide on a course of action. The board asked the district to assemble the committee to seek potential "efficiencies" in gifted services for grades seven through 12. The panel is made up of parents, teachers and administrators.
NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every spring, Ed Stevens watches his academically talented sons waste valuable classroom time as their teachers drill slower learners for the important PSSA state tests. "High learners are being held down," said Stevens, whose two children attend schools in the Tredyffrin/Easttown district in Chester County. "They're not getting what they need to grow. " With public schools across the region focused on aiding struggling students to meet federal mandates, many area parents believe their gifted and talented children are being shortchanged.
NEWS
June 8, 1995 | By Laura Genao, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
State officials have given the Marple Newtown School District a mandate: Change your gifted-education program or risk losing state funds. The state's demands were the reason about 200 people attended an administration-sponsored public forum Tuesday to discuss the legal and educational ramifications of a change in the district's gifted-education program. "We want to do what's least disruptive to the children currently in the system," said Brenda Winkler, assistant superintendent.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
The parents group whose complaints prompted a state investigation of the Cheltenham School District's gifted-education program is upset because it won't have a say in writing a corrective action plan. Michael Bomstein, president of the Cheltenham Chapter of the Pennsylvania Association for Gifted Education (PAGE), said district officials had refused the group's offer of help to draft a plan that would bring the district in compliance with state guidelines. Bomstein said Thursday that Superintendent Dr. Charles Stefanski "has made it clear that we are being disinvited from the process.
NEWS
January 4, 2005
Gifted education essential for future leadership I was thrilled to see the Dec. 29 commentary by Kim Maguire on the merits of gifted education and the consequences of failing to nurture students who are smart but come from poor families ("Nurture gifted students' growth"). I am a retired school principal who not only took my master's degree in gifted education, but I personally was a recipient of its benefits. I came from two illiterate parents. Had it not been for Girls' High in Philadelphia, which at the time had the gifted program for girls, I would have had a totally different life.
NEWS
February 7, 1997 | By Todd Bishop, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Parents received assurances from administrators this week that the Council Rock School District's gifted education program is not in danger. But students and parents remain worried about a report that could determine the future of the program. "Why is it that everything good in this district gets challenged?" asked Holland resident Susan Tucker, one of more than 200 people gathered for a special meeting Wednesday night at Richboro Junior High School. The district has assembled a committee at the request of the school board to seek potential "efficiencies" in gifted services for grades seven through 12. The committee plans to report to the school board in March.
NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every spring, Ed Stevens watches his academically talented sons waste valuable classroom time as their teachers drill slower learners for the important PSSA state tests. "High learners are being held down," said Stevens, whose two children attend schools in the Tredyffrin/Easttown district in Chester County. "They're not getting what they need to grow. " With public schools across the region focused on aiding struggling students to meet federal mandates, many area parents believe their gifted and talented children are being shortchanged.
NEWS
August 9, 1990 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
For parent Beverly Segal, the Cheltenham School District's gifted education program had both good parts and bad parts. The good part was that her 12-year-old son, David, who will be starting the seventh grade in September, was feeling better about himself. For a couple of hours during the week, he and other gifted students were pulled out of their classrooms to learn about classical literature. The bad part was that after those scant few hours, he returned to his class and "the same old dittos," Segal said.
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NEWS
April 9, 2011 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Faced with a $629 million shortfall, the Philadelphia School District on Friday announced an early-retirement incentive program to try to reduce the number of layoffs. The district is offering employees 18 months of paid health coverage under their current insurance plans, including medical, dental, vision, and prescription services. The package is open to employees of any age who will have at least 35 years of service July 1; employees 60 or older with 30 years of service; and employees 62 or older with one year of service.
NEWS
November 19, 2008 | By Del Siegle and Roberta Braverman
Multiple crises are forcing elected officials to focus almost exclusively on near-term challenges, ignoring areas that could lead to more vexing predicaments. Perhaps nowhere is this shortsightedness more apparent than in our nation's disregard for educating our most promising students. While emerging nations are redoubling their investments in their brightest minds, the United States has opted for neglect. Washington invests a pittance in gifted education - about 2.6 cents of every $100 in federal education funds.
NEWS
May 27, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania is taking steps to make gifted education available to more students, but that has done little to quell long-standing tension between parents and school districts over how the state's brightest are educated. The proposed changes on course to become final this summer make clear that districts must use more than an IQ score to identify gifted students - as most other states do. The state sets a 130 IQ as the trigger for gifted education and allows districts to choose the other criteria, such as teacher recommendations and classroom work.
NEWS
March 16, 2008 | By Kate Levin FOR THE INQUIRER
Make-believe detectives examined fingerprints and scribbled clues in their notebooks. Nearby, children launched a rocket fueled by Alka Seltzer and water. Despite appearances, this was not the school science fair. Instead, it was a social mixer for an unusual peer group - youngsters often set apart by their high intelligence and sense of social unease. The 17th annual conference of the New Jersey Association for Gifted Children drew roughly 700 people to a hotel and conference center in Princeton two weeks ago. Among them were kindergartners to middle school students who learned together, and parents and teachers who attended workshops and listened to lectures.
NEWS
February 11, 2005 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Parents of special-needs children have become organized to improve services in their school districts - and are rallying other Montgomery County parents to do the same. Parents from Lower Merion and six other county districts with parent organizations - Abington, Jenkintown, Methacton, North Penn, Souderton and Wissahickon - have formed the Montgomery County Special Education Cooperative. The aim is to inform parents about the complexities of special-education law and improve special-education offerings in public schools.
NEWS
January 4, 2005
Gifted education essential for future leadership I was thrilled to see the Dec. 29 commentary by Kim Maguire on the merits of gifted education and the consequences of failing to nurture students who are smart but come from poor families ("Nurture gifted students' growth"). I am a retired school principal who not only took my master's degree in gifted education, but I personally was a recipient of its benefits. I came from two illiterate parents. Had it not been for Girls' High in Philadelphia, which at the time had the gifted program for girls, I would have had a totally different life.
NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every spring, Ed Stevens watches his academically talented sons waste valuable classroom time as their teachers drill slower learners for the important PSSA state tests. "High learners are being held down," said Stevens, whose two children attend schools in the Tredyffrin/Easttown district in Chester County. "They're not getting what they need to grow. " With public schools across the region focused on aiding struggling students to meet federal mandates, many area parents believe their gifted and talented children are being shortchanged.
NEWS
May 28, 2004 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every spring, Ed Stevens watches his academically talented sons waste valuable classroom time as their teachers drill slower learners for the important PSSA state tests. "High learners are being held down," said Stevens, whose two children attend schools in the Tredyffrin/Easttown district in Chester County. "They're not getting what they need to grow. " With public schools across the region focused on aiding struggling students to meet federal mandates, many area parents believe their gifted and talented children are being shortchanged.
NEWS
August 26, 2001 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two Moorestown teachers have been honored by the New Jersey Association for Gifted Children and the Moorestown PACE (Program of Acceleration, Challenge and Enrichment) Committee. The committee, which promotes gifted education in the township schools, and the state group cited Jane LaMarra and Linda Hall for their contributions to gifted education. LaMarra is the school district's mathematics supervisor, and Hall is a mathematics teacher at the William Allen Middle School. Cherokee High School Lee Ann Lowden, an English teacher who has taught at Cherokee for 19 years, has been named Burlington County teacher of the year for the 2001-02 school year.
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