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Gilda Radner

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1989 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once you start Gilda Radner's recording of her autobiography, It's Always Something, you won't want to stop. And that's probably an impulse worth following. Listening to the three- hour abridgment during a 20-minute commute, it would take a full work week to finish - and you'd be in a blue funk the whole time. You'd become morose and feel the need to call close friends for reassuring conversation. This is not to imply that the presentation is a failure. Quite the contrary.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | By T. Bitman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER This story contains information from the Associated Press, Life, New York Daily News and USA Today
Tributes to comedians Gilda Radner and Sam Kinison are in the works this month in opposite ends of the country. Gene Wilder, who was married to Radner, is setting up an annual tennis tournament to benefit "Gilda's Club," a free support group on the East Coast for cancer patients. Forming such a group was one of Radner's last wishes. Among those expected to play in the first tournament, to be held Saturday at Ivan Lendl's club in Bedford, N.Y., are actors Mel Brooks and wife Anne Bancroft; Mandy Patinkin; John Candy, and Steve Guttenberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1989 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
Most of the original Saturday Night Live crew from the years 1975 to 1980 have gone on to bigger, if not necessarily better, things. Looking back on the trend-setting skits and parodies of that seminal series, it's amazing how well the humor holds up. Even today, can you see the words samurai or Conehead without cracking a faint smile? As memorable as individual skits were, it's the Not-Ready-for-Prime-Time Players that we remember best. In the last couple of years, Warner Home Video has paid homage to the most popular - John Belushi, Chevy Chase and Dan Aykroyd - with individual The Best of . . . collections.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Long before the Manic Pixie Dream Girl - that flighty, unstable film and television trope beloved by sensitive young men, reviled by feminists - had a name, Saturday Night Live comedy writer Alan Zweibel had Gilda Radner. After the comedian's death from ovarian cancer at age 42 in 1989, Zweibel wrote Bunny Bunny , a memoir of their almost-relationship and long friendship, and later adapted it for the stage. The show premiered at Philadelphia Theatre Company in 1997. But with this more intimate revival, 1812 Productions - a company helmed by Jennifer Childs, another very funny woman - makes a better fit. Zweibel's script has some issues.
NEWS
September 27, 2013
THE FIRST staff meeting of what would eventually become "Saturday Night Live" was, in and of itself, a momentous occasion in show business annals. But that summer-of-1975 gathering in the office of "SNL" executive producer Lorne Michaels was a red-letter day in the life of comedy writer Alan Zweibel for reasons that transcend the 38-year-old comedy-variety show's pop culture importance. For that was the day he met the late, great Gilda Radner . It is that fateful occasion and its aftermath that are at the heart of the 1812 Productions presentation of Zweibel's "Bunny Bunny - Gilda Radner: A Sort of Romantic Comedy," which runs through Oct. 27 at Independence Studio on 3, at the Walnut Street Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1996 | By Douglas J. Keating, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Alan Zweibel never intended to write the play Bunny Bunny, which the Philadelphia Theatre Company is premiering. But then, neither did he intend to write the book Bunny Bunny, which preceded the play. What Zweibel wrote originally was a personal document, a catharsis to heal the emotional wound he suffered when his close friend comedian Gilda Radner died of ovarian cancer. "It was written at the behest of my wife, and Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner and Rob Reiner and a lot of my other friends who thought I needed closure, having lost a friend, so I wrote this.
NEWS
July 30, 1987 | Edited by Kathleen Shea from the New York Post, the Associated Press, Reuters, the New York Daily News and the New York Post
HOISTED ON HIS OWN PETARD Never kid a kidder. Crispin Glover, the young actor who plays the speed freak in "River's Edge," goofed on the David Letterman show the other night and the Prep Prince of Goof was not amused. Glover, decked out in '60s hippie clothes and platform shoes, got up in the middle of a bland rap about his new apartment, went into some nonsense about strength and wrestling and then let loose with a karate kick that ended a foot or so from Letterman's face.
NEWS
May 3, 1988 | By TOM SHALES, Special to the Daily News
"I haven't been on television for a while," Gilda Radner tells Garry Shandling. "Oh that, yeah," Garry says. "What was wrong?" "Oh, I had cancer," says Gilda. "What did you have?" "I just had a series of bad career moves," says Garry. And with that, Gilda Radner has come back to television and a grateful public eye. Her guest-star gig on the current edition of "It's Garry Shandling's Show," on Showtime cable last Friday, was supposed to happen two years ago but was postponed at the last minute.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1992 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Far more troubling than what happens to the political losers come Wednesday morning is what will happen to national treasure Dana Carvey should neither George Bush nor Ross Perot capture The Prize. Such losses would be disastrous for our republic, as Saturday Night Live's Presidential Bash amply demonstrates from 9 to 11 tonight on Channel 3. Not to slight Phil Hartman's Bill Clinton. Hartman does a very convincing Clinton, with his sandpaper-sore voice and mantra of change, change and more change.
NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Cat Coyle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jenny and Matt Stuetz have two things on their mind at all times: her cancer and their children. The Willow Grove couple were devastated when Jenny, 43, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. But their focus since then has been on keeping her healthy while also keeping the lives of their children - son Jackson, now 8, and daughter Madison, now 7 - as normal as possible. So for at least one week this summer, the children were able to shed some of their worries at Camp KIDS, a program of Gilda's Club in Warminster.
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NEWS
July 16, 2015 | By Cat Coyle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jenny and Matt Stuetz have two things on their mind at all times: her cancer and their children. The Willow Grove couple were devastated when Jenny, 43, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2011. But their focus since then has been on keeping her healthy while also keeping the lives of their children - son Jackson, now 8, and daughter Madison, now 7 - as normal as possible. So for at least one week this summer, the children were able to shed some of their worries at Camp KIDS, a program of Gilda's Club in Warminster.
NEWS
October 10, 2014
TO A LARGE degree, the story of modern-day comedy has been written primarily in a handful of towns. New York and Los Angeles, obviously, are among them, but two others are just as important: Chicago and Toronto. Both are permanent residences of Second City, the groundbreaking improvisational-comedy troupe that has been the training ground for a mind-boggling number of comedy megastars from Joan Rivers and Robert Klein to John Belushi and Gilda Radner , from Martin Short and Catherine O'Hara to Tina Fey and three current "Saturday Night Live" cast members.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY Ready . . . aim . . . thonk ! The first fruitcake hit the target, and the small crowd whooped. Never mind the snow-covered beach, which forced the event onto a sheltered porch at Resorts Casino's LandShark Bar & Grill. Never mind the frigid conditions. The celebration of National Fruitcake Toss Day in Atlantic City had made its wacky start. First up was Don Guardian - the gay Republican sworn in Wednesday as Atlantic City mayor - who said that when he heard about the fruitcake toss, he was "thrilled they were talking about the cake, and not me. " He said the event showed that even on a day that began with the mercury at minus 3 degrees, breaking a record set in 1918, "bundling up and coming out can be a whole lot of fun. " Apparently, there were few rules.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2013 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The second act of the career of comedian Gilda Radner (1946-1989) is longer than the first - and growing. Her legacy continues in Philadelphia. Bunny Bunny , written by quondam Saturday Night Live writer Alan Zweibel, is at Indepedence Studio on 3 at the Walnut Street Theatre through Oct. 27. It's staged by 1812 Productions, long dedicated to the traditions of American comedy. Written in 1997, the play was given its world premiere by the Philadelphia Theatre Company. It celebrates the friendship between Radner - she of the famed "freshman class" of SNL , 1975-1980 - and Zweibel, show writer and fellow freshperson.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Long before the Manic Pixie Dream Girl - that flighty, unstable film and television trope beloved by sensitive young men, reviled by feminists - had a name, Saturday Night Live comedy writer Alan Zweibel had Gilda Radner. After the comedian's death from ovarian cancer at age 42 in 1989, Zweibel wrote Bunny Bunny , a memoir of their almost-relationship and long friendship, and later adapted it for the stage. The show premiered at Philadelphia Theatre Company in 1997. But with this more intimate revival, 1812 Productions - a company helmed by Jennifer Childs, another very funny woman - makes a better fit. Zweibel's script has some issues.
NEWS
September 27, 2013
THE FIRST staff meeting of what would eventually become "Saturday Night Live" was, in and of itself, a momentous occasion in show business annals. But that summer-of-1975 gathering in the office of "SNL" executive producer Lorne Michaels was a red-letter day in the life of comedy writer Alan Zweibel for reasons that transcend the 38-year-old comedy-variety show's pop culture importance. For that was the day he met the late, great Gilda Radner . It is that fateful occasion and its aftermath that are at the heart of the 1812 Productions presentation of Zweibel's "Bunny Bunny - Gilda Radner: A Sort of Romantic Comedy," which runs through Oct. 27 at Independence Studio on 3, at the Walnut Street Theatre.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Diane Strassle and Marcy McGuire, Reiki practitioners from Gilda's Club Delaware Valley, greeted Patsy Walker kindly as she was wheeled into a conference room at Abington Memorial Hospital. This was to be her first experience with the Japanese healing art, an alternative treatment that uses gentle, sustained touch to transmit energy. Walker, a striking woman with long blond hair, was silent, her head down. "Take a deep breath," McGuire told her. "Let out all that tension. " "I have pancreatic cancer," Walker, 60, whispered.
NEWS
April 19, 2002 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Turning 40 holds no terrors for Jodie Foster, who reaches the milestone in November. She said in London yesterday, "I think women are more interesting in their 40s. They've lived longer, they're more confident about their choices, and they don't have to be hip and cool anymore, which I think is a godsend - you make really bad choices when you are trying to be hip. " Foster, whose latest film, Panic Room, has been a box-office hit, said: "You...
LIVING
February 5, 2000 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rapper/talk-show host Queen Latifah will get busy in town Monday. First is a cohosting stint at TV's Good Day Philadelphia from 8 to 9 a.m. on Fox - home of her talk show, picked up for a second season. She will follow that with a short radio stint on WUSL-FM (98.9). Then it's on to a South Philadelphia school (whose location is being kept under wraps because it's a surprise), where she will tell the kiddies how she made it in The Biz. THERE SHE IS . . . MRS. LT. GOV. Miss America plans to become a Mrs. this fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1996 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Alan Zweibel met Gilda Radner behind a fake tree at a planning session for a new TV show called Saturday Night Live. He was a young writer, she a young improvisational actress, and both were terrified of what lay ahead. From that inauspicious encounter came a friendship that lasted 15 years, ending with Radner's death from ovarian cancer in 1989. She called him Zweibel; he decided to call her Gilbert - because everyone else, including strangers on the street, called her Gilda. The friendship is the subject of Zweibel's funny and ultimately touching play, Bunny Bunny, on view through Dec. 1 at Plays and Players Theatre in a Philadelphia Theatre Company production.
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