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Gilmore Girls

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NEWS
May 15, 2007 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Created with the help of a consortium of advertisers, squirreled away on a tiny network aimed at teenagers, one of the most unlikely series in TV history ends its gentle, and surprisingly long, journey tonight at 8 on CW57. With seven seasons, Gilmore Girls went further than such TV legends as Leave It to Beaver, Sanford and Son and St. Elsewhere, yet fans were clamoring for more, and the network seemed willing. But contract negotiations with the show's stars broke down two weeks ago. Here was a series featuring teenage girls where brains mattered more than boobs, and the dialogue was richer than anything on television, including the bombast of Aaron Sorkin on The West Wing or Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2000 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Something amazing happens tonight at 8 on the WB. Like many of us, a bunch of advertisers decided they were sick and tired of the lame sex jokes and dippy drama that fill so much of the TV menu. Unlike many of us, they had the cash to do something about it. They put up more than $1 million to develop a series they would like. And the surprise is that it's not an elegy to fabric softener, an ode to luxury cars, or a sonnet to soda pop. It's a touching, funny, lively show that really does appeal to all ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2012 | Ellen Gray
BUNHEADS. 9 p.m. Monday, ABC Family.   I ONCE LISTENED as an executive from the old WB moaned about how shows on the youth-oriented network never got any love from Emmy voters.   They were all just too old, he figured. Having seen new shows occasionally work their way into the winner's circle through supporting casts, I asked if they'd considered a campaign for Kelly Bishop. "Who's Kelly Bishop?" he asked. I'd like to think any "Gilmore Girls" fan could have filled him in, Bishop having played patrician grandmother Emily Gilmore to near-perfection for seven seasons, six on the WB. But the question of who Bishop is probably comes closer to an answer Monday, as "Gilmore Girls" creator Amy Sherman-Palladino's new series "Bunheads" premieres on ABC Family.
LIVING
December 26, 2000 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
O great Stormboli, seer of all that's televisual, what hast thou foretold of the tube's new programs? Bette: "The season's best new series" (Sept. 17). Au contraire, potato-chip breath. The best new series is Gilmore Girls. Ed: Will probably "be rejected by the mass audience that the big networks require" (Oct. 8). Incorrect, cross-eyed one. Ed's getting by in the ratings. Genuinely on life-support is another critical success, the touching That's Life. Gideon's Crossing: "The dialogue is frequently poetic" (Oct.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2007 | By David Hiltbrand FOR THE INQUIRER
It's fitting that the TV season echoes the school calendar. Each fall, a new batch of hopefuls comes marching in, and every spring, a group of graduates, many of whom we've come to love, leaves for good. And around commencement time (May sweeps), all kinds of unexpected people show up on campus. I'm still trying to figure out what the king of Texas stomp, Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top, was doing giving away a bride on the season finale of Bones. But at least he dressed for the occasion in a tux with buckles, sunglasses and his trademark Esther Williams bathing cap. Tell me, how are we supposed to live without the Gilmore Girls?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2004 | By Karen Heller INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As every desperate housewife knows, 8 p.m. is not the hour to air fun TV with a decided PG-13 slant. Actually, every desperate television viewer knows this. And our numbers are legion. Especially the many of us with zero appetite for dramas starring corpses, latex gloves and scowling investigators - or for "reality" television featuring scheming, needy people who are far too familiar to qualify as entertainment. Yet, those brilliant programmers at Fox air the delicious confection The O.C. at precisely that hour on Thursdays.
LIVING
December 24, 2000 | By Eirik Knutzen, FOR THE INQUIRER
Lauren Graham launched her professional acting career as a dog named Striker - the official mascot for a 1993 World Cup Soccer conference at a New York convention center. Buried under a mound of rubber, latex and fake fur with a giant helmetlike head, the starving Graham was excited about the gig that paid $300 per day. "I had never made so much money in my life, so I couldn't wait to get started," she says. "There I was, posing for pictures with the conventioneers, smiling a smile nobody would see under the costume's head.
NEWS
May 16, 2001 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Country music star Reba McEntire, ex-Seinfelder Jason Alexander, Courtney Thorne-Smith from Ally McBeal, and - be still, my beating heart - Philadelphia sitcom superstar Bob Saget will turn up in new shows on the tube next fall. ABC and the WB announced their autumn slates yesterday, and it was good-news, bad-news for quality-TV lovers. The big network confirmed the pickup of the heartfelt family drama Once and Again and the rib-rattling cop comedy The Job, while the WB canceled the quirkily hilarious Grosse Pointe and sent the beloved aliens of Roswell back into outer space.
NEWS
January 25, 2006 | By David Hiltbrand and Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
CBS and Warner Bros. Entertainment announced yesterday that they will merge their UPN and WB networks to form a new network, the CW. Each of the entertainment giants will own 50 percent of the new network, which will begin broadcasting in the fall. UPN and WB will go off the air at that time. In the Philadelphia market, the new network will have its home on Channel 57, currently a UPN affiliate owned by CBS. Channel 17, which currently broadcasts WB programming, will become an independent station in September.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2001 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
It used to be that small towns on TV were bastions of normality, from white-bread, suburban Mayfield on Leave It to Beaver to gritty, working-class Lanford on Roseanne. The Springfield of the 1950s family comedy Father Knows Best was so straight-arrow, Dad often wore a tie to wash the car. No more. Imagine the Beav hanging out with the potty-mouthed kids in bucolic, alien-invaded South Park. Or Roseanne's husband, Dan, bowling with the oddball inhabitants of Ed's wacky Stuckeyville.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2012 | Ellen Gray
BUNHEADS. 9 p.m. Monday, ABC Family.   I ONCE LISTENED as an executive from the old WB moaned about how shows on the youth-oriented network never got any love from Emmy voters.   They were all just too old, he figured. Having seen new shows occasionally work their way into the winner's circle through supporting casts, I asked if they'd considered a campaign for Kelly Bishop. "Who's Kelly Bishop?" he asked. I'd like to think any "Gilmore Girls" fan could have filled him in, Bishop having played patrician grandmother Emily Gilmore to near-perfection for seven seasons, six on the WB. But the question of who Bishop is probably comes closer to an answer Monday, as "Gilmore Girls" creator Amy Sherman-Palladino's new series "Bunheads" premieres on ABC Family.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2010
SCOUNDRELS. 9 p.m. Sunday, Channel 6. THE GATES. 10 p.m. Sunday, Channel 6. HBO'S HAD "The Sopranos," Showtime has "Weeds," AMC has "Breaking Bad," but crime doesn't seem to pay on network television, where a "Law & Order" can run for 20 seasons, but shows that portray perps in an even vaguely sympathetic light are lucky to make it through one. R.I.P., CBS' "Smith" and "Cane," NBC's "Heist" and "Kingpin. " Sure, the rogues of mainstream TNT's "Leverage," which returns at 9 p.m. Sunday, seem to be doing OK. But it's summer, it's still cable, no matter how middle of the road, and the actors are, let's face it, playing Robin Hood more than they are actual robbers.
NEWS
May 11, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Lauren Graham is a little surprised to find herself in Philadelphia as part of a quick East Coast publicity swing. After all, her NBC show, Parenthood, is still shooting in Los Angeles. But when your boss, a big Hollywood mogul with roots in TV, tells you to jump on a plane, you say, "Window or aisle?" "It was explained to me that Ron Howard, when he was doing Happy Days, had success in traveling the country and talking about the show. So this was like Ron Howard wanted me to come here," Graham says, laughing.
NEWS
May 11, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lauren Graham is a little surprised to find herself in Philadelphia as part of a quick East Coast publicity swing. After all, her NBC show, Parenthood , is still shooting in Los Angeles. But when your boss, a big Hollywood mogul with roots in TV, tells you to jump on a plane, you say, "Window or aisle?" "It was explained to me that Ron Howard, when he was doing Happy Days , had success in traveling the country and talking about the show. So this was like Ron Howard wanted me to come here," Graham says, laughing.
NEWS
June 5, 2007 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Knock, knock. Who's there? The CW. Who? Who, indeed. The fledgling network with the weird name and the mongrel identity spent its inaugural season in Witness Protection. And with good reason. Launched in just three months, the corporate love child of the WB and UPN debuted in September with relatively little promotion. Its lineup featured two new shows and more than a few returning series with cobwebs. "They went out and said, 'We're a new network,' but there was almost nothing new," says Mediaweek analyst Marc Berman.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2007 | By David Hiltbrand FOR THE INQUIRER
It's fitting that the TV season echoes the school calendar. Each fall, a new batch of hopefuls comes marching in, and every spring, a group of graduates, many of whom we've come to love, leaves for good. And around commencement time (May sweeps), all kinds of unexpected people show up on campus. I'm still trying to figure out what the king of Texas stomp, Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top, was doing giving away a bride on the season finale of Bones. But at least he dressed for the occasion in a tux with buckles, sunglasses and his trademark Esther Williams bathing cap. Tell me, how are we supposed to live without the Gilmore Girls?
NEWS
May 15, 2007 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Created with the help of a consortium of advertisers, squirreled away on a tiny network aimed at teenagers, one of the most unlikely series in TV history ends its gentle, and surprisingly long, journey tonight at 8 on CW57. With seven seasons, Gilmore Girls went further than such TV legends as Leave It to Beaver, Sanford and Son and St. Elsewhere, yet fans were clamoring for more, and the network seemed willing. But contract negotiations with the show's stars broke down two weeks ago. Here was a series featuring teenage girls where brains mattered more than boobs, and the dialogue was richer than anything on television, including the bombast of Aaron Sorkin on The West Wing or Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip.
NEWS
March 13, 2007 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Is this the beginning of the end of American Idol? The competition would trade anything for what one network boss calls the "Death Star," a show that destroys any program put up against it and commands ad rates four times higher than average, and one which, barring strange circumstances, could still have Fox singing sweetly in 2015. After constantly growing in ratings since its first season in 2002 and consistently lurking in the top 10 overall, Idol hit the No. 1 spot for the first time last year.
NEWS
January 25, 2006 | By David Hiltbrand and Michael D. Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
CBS and Warner Bros. Entertainment announced yesterday that they will merge their UPN and WB networks to form a new network, the CW. Each of the entertainment giants will own 50 percent of the new network, which will begin broadcasting in the fall. UPN and WB will go off the air at that time. In the Philadelphia market, the new network will have its home on Channel 57, currently a UPN affiliate owned by CBS. Channel 17, which currently broadcasts WB programming, will become an independent station in September.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2005 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
The fall TV season is no laughing matter, but half of the best new shows are comedies. And there's other strangeness in the air - every single broadcast network has a noteworthy series. However, after the excess success of last year, creativity has cooled down. There's lots to like for 2005-2006, and viewers will tune in. But they may be loath to unlock their hearts. A pair of returnees rounds out this toast to 10 shows. They're switching time slots, along with more than 20 others, and they could use the special attention.
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