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BUSINESS
August 9, 1986 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Allied Stores yesterday completed its acquisition of seven local Gimbels outlets for conversion to its Stern's division and has closed them until Monday to take inventory and put new sales tickets on merchandise. On Wednesday, Stern's will begin a four-day sale on remaining summer goods. On the following Monday, Aug. 18, the stores will begin to convert from the Gimbels to the Stern's name. Allied Stores, one of the nation's largest department store operators, agreed in June to purchase seven Gimbels stores in this region, except those in Upper Darby and Cheltenham, for $150 to $175 million in cash.
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | By Kenneth Finkel
Napoleon did it. Lord Elgin did it. Art has always been one of the favorite spoils of dominance and conflict. But who would have thought that Stern's department stores would do it? Last spring, about the same time Stern's announced plans to sell off its seven Philadelphia stores, three paintings of Philadelphia were taken from the Gallery on Market Street to Stern's corporate headquarters in Paramus, N.J. Officials hoped to sell the paintings, too. Recently, however, they decided to accept no offers, to make no gifts.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1986 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Retail stores are proving to be hot merchandise themselves these days. First came the surprise Sunday closing of the B. Altman & Co. store in Willow Grove, in the wake of the sale of the chain to a group of New York investors. Next came word that the British conglomerate that owns Gimbels is putting the department store chain on the block. Gimbels is owned by BAT Industries, which also has interests in tobacco, paper and financial services. Altman's abrupt closing caught store employees, customers, and competitors by surprise.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1986 | The Inquirer Staff
Allied Stores Corp. yesterday said that it had completed the acquisition of the nine Gimbels store locations, inventories and receivables, and a Jersey City warehouse from Louisville, Ky.-based Batus Inc. Allied said it planned to operate eight of the stores - seven in the Philadelphia area and one in the New York area - as Stern's, bringing to 25 the number of stores in the Stern's division. A ninth Gimbels store, in Lancaster, will become the 16th store in another Allied retail division, Pomeroy's.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1988 | By NANCY HASS, Daily News Staff Writer
They vied for cast-off clothes racks and loads of Pound Puppies, barely stopping between bids to speak of the end of an era. Dozens of wholesalers and flea market vendors came to Gimbels in Cheltenham yesterday for the store's final auction, the swan song for a chain that long was a fixture in Philadelphia retailing. From ginger jars to vinyl dumbbells, the buyers - a cozy group who seemed to know each other from the auction circuit - generally paid less than 25 cents on the dollar for the numbered lots of merchandise.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1986 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The day after B. Altman & Co. announced last week that it was closing its store in the Willow Grove Park mall, the owner of Gimbel Brothers put that struggling chain, including nine outlets in the Philadelphia region, up for sale. Different stores, different problems. But the fates of B. Altman and Gimbels illustrate how traditional department stores are under fire and lumbering towards extinction unless merchants move swiftly to change some time-worn practices, retailing experts say. Department stores are getting shot at from all sides by specialty stores, off-price chains, discounters and catalogue merchants.
NEWS
November 30, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The original Gimbel Brothers building on Market Street between Eighth and Ninth is now a parking lot. There is no trace of the defunct department store in what is now the Gallery, or in any suburban mall for that matter. The once-bustling chain, which once owned Saks Fifth Avenue, closed its doors in Philadelphia 25 years ago. So why write a book about Gimbels now? "Because just hearing the name makes people happy," said Michael J. Lisicky, author of Gimbels Has It!
NEWS
June 18, 1986 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
The move yesterday by a British company to sell eight local Gimbels stores has endangered a revered Philadelphia institution - the annual Thanksgiving Day parade. The status of the parade is not clear. Batus, based in Great Britain, yesterday said it had sold all but two of the Gimbels stores in the Philadelphia area to Allied Stores Corp., and that it would no longer sponsor the event. Then, Allied's top executive said his company didn't have time to organize this year's parade effectively.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1986 | By GARY THOMPSON and ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff Writer Fred Lowe also contributed to this report.)
The parent company of Gimbels department stores yesterday disclosed it will sell eight of its ten Philadelphia area stores to Allied Stores Corp. Prospects for the Gimbels stores in Upper Darby and Cheltenham appear less certain, although sources said the company is still negotiating to sell both stores. BATUS Inc., the British conglomerate that owns the chain, announced it would sell 10 Gimbels outlets in the East to Allied Stores Corp., including these area stores - the Gallery, the Northeast, King of Prussia, Oxford Valley Mall in Langhorne, Granite Run Mall in Media, Lancaster, Echelon Mall in Vorhees, N.J. and Moorestown, N.J. BATUS said it is negotiating to sell the Cheltenham to a second and unidentified buyer, but declined to comment on the long-term disposition of the Upper Darby outlet.
NEWS
June 11, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Stansell McGowan, 92, of Devon, a retired department-store manager who was honored for her service to the United States during World War II, died of pneumonia May 20 at Paoli Hospital. Mrs. McGowan was appointed manager of the Gimbel Bros. store in Center City in 1963. According to newspaper accounts, she was the first woman in the city's history to manage a major department store. Previously, she had been personnel director for Gimbels' Philadelphia-area stores. The head of Gimbels' operations in Philadelphia, H.J. Grinsfelder, told a reporter that Mrs. McGowan had the experience for the job and "adds the woman's touch to a business essentially cliented to women.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2013
NOT TO WAX nostalgic, but Center City used to be the place to shop. There were four major department stores - Gimbels, Lit Bros., Strawbridge & Clothier and John Wanamaker's - all within a few blocks of each other. To a young James Kenny, department stores were exciting places. He fell so in love with the business during the early 1970s that he skipped medical school to focus on retail, never dreaming how drastically things would change. Kenny retired this month from Macy's after almost 42 years in an industry that's undergone huge transformations.
NEWS
November 13, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ann Gimbel-Goff, 85, a "no nonsense" mother who raised six children and became a long-distance runner, died at Rydal Park in Jenkintown on Wednesday, Nov. 7, of complications from Parkinson's disease. She had fought the disease for the last 15 years of her life. Mrs. Gimbel-Goff was born in Abington Township in 1927, and was a great-granddaughter of Adam Gimbel, founder of Gimbel's department stores. She was the third of seven children, and was predeceased by a brother, Roger Gimbel, and sister Joyce Trifield.
NEWS
November 30, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
The original Gimbel Brothers building on Market Street between Eighth and Ninth is now a parking lot. There is no trace of the defunct department store in what is now the Gallery, or in any suburban mall for that matter. The once-bustling chain, which once owned Saks Fifth Avenue, closed its doors in Philadelphia 25 years ago. So why write a book about Gimbels now? "Because just hearing the name makes people happy," said Michael J. Lisicky, author of Gimbels Has It!
NEWS
November 17, 2011 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
I was examining our old piano the other day, a 1924 Sohmer that we bought when my father-in-law died and we wanted something lasting to remember him by. Through its serial number, we tracked its provenance to the piano department of Strawbridge & Clothier at 801 Market St. Why shouldn't Strawbridge's sell baby grands? It had everything else: an employee chorus and radio station. Uniformed doormen and elevator ladies. Cash boys to run between the counters and registers, which is how the venerable emporium came to hire the 13-year-old W.C. Fields.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | Associated Press
LOS ANGELES - Emmy Award-winning TV producer Roger Gimbel, who worked Bing Crosby, Sophia Loren and other stars, has died. He was 86. Gimbel died on Tuesday of pneumonia at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Gimbel's wife, actress Jennifer Warren, was at his side. Gimbel, a Philadelphia native, was a member of the Gimbels department-store family. Gimbel's 500-plus productions received 18 Emmys, including one for 1973's "A War of Children," about Irish and Protestant friends engulfed by strife in Belfast.
NEWS
November 26, 2010 | By CATHERINE LUCEY, luceyc@phillynews.com 215-854-4172
FOR 48 years, Lou Dallago has bundled up with his family and come into Center City for the annual Thanksgiving Day parade. Dallago, 78, started taking his kids when they were young, carrying a ladder on the subway so that they could get a good view of the traditional floats, bands and, of course, Santa Claus. But this year, he wasn't so sure he wanted to go. "I was going to take a break this year, because it was supposed to rain, but we had the little guy," said Dallago, pointing at his 10-year-old grandson.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2008 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia's annual Boscov's-6ABC Thanksgiving Day Parade, in jeopardy since the Boscov's department store chain declared bankruptcy in August, has a new sponsor and yesterday secured a commitment for city aid. Swedish retail furniture giant IKEA, whose North American headquarters are in Conshohocken, agreed to replace Boscov's as title sponsor of the parade after being approached by WPVI-TV, the Disney-owned ABC affiliate that produces and...
NEWS
April 27, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Elizabeth Tremmel Mills, 105, of Upper Gwynedd, a confectioner who created fanciful figures with sugar and chocolate, died April 19 at the Golden Living Center in Lansdale. Mrs. Mills was raised at St. Vincent's Orphanage in Philadelphia after her mother died when the girl was 8. At 15, she went to work as a chocolate coater at the Goldenberg Candy Co. in Philadelphia. During World War I, she briefly worked at a DuPont-run munitions factory. She married Richard Mills in 1926.
NEWS
June 11, 2007 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Stansell McGowan, 92, of Devon, a retired department-store manager who was honored for her service to the United States during World War II, died of pneumonia May 20 at Paoli Hospital. Mrs. McGowan was appointed manager of the Gimbel Bros. store in Center City in 1963. According to newspaper accounts, she was the first woman in the city's history to manage a major department store. Previously, she had been personnel director for Gimbels' Philadelphia-area stores. The head of Gimbels' operations in Philadelphia, H.J. Grinsfelder, told a reporter that Mrs. McGowan had the experience for the job and "adds the woman's touch to a business essentially cliented to women.
NEWS
May 28, 2005 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles C. Miller, 88, a multitalented interior designer who was awarded the Bronze Star for planning reconstruction of railroads and roads near Paris devastated by the Nazis during World War II, died of heart failure at Burdette Tomlin Memorial Hospital in Cape May, N.J. He was a longtime resident of Newtown, Bucks County. Born in Warren, Pa., Mr. Miller was raised in Cortland, N.Y. After earning a bachelor's degree in industrial design in 1937 from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, he began working for a design firm based in New York's Rockefeller Center.
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