CollectionsGimmick
IN THE NEWS

Gimmick

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 16, 1986
One of the first lessons we are taught by our parents, teachers and other persons of authority is that we must obey the law. Later in life we are taught that the basic philosophy of our nation is that it is based upon laws, not on the whims or the political designs of elected leaders. If the President of the United States doesn't accept this philosophy, how can we expect youth to obey the law? As Al Smith, governor of New York about 60 years ago, said: "Let's look at the record.
SPORTS
September 15, 1988 | By Paul Domowitch, Daily News Sports Writer
You need more than just ability to make a name for yourself in the NFL these days. You also need a gimmick. You need a weird haircut or a strange pet or a belly the size of the Hindenburg. You need a paternity suit or a drug suspension or a book on The New York Times best-seller list. Other than being a devout Christian and a devoted family man, Charles Mann doesn't have a gimmick. To make matters worse, he lines up just three doors down from an outspoken fellow by the name of Dexter Manley, who held the all- time NFL record for gimmicks until Brian Bosworth came along and broke it. So, it is not terribly surprising that, despite notching 34 1/2 quarterback sacks over the last three seasons, it has taken the world a while to finally get around to noticing the Washington Redskins' other defensive end. Mann stomped into our conciousness last January in the Redskins' dramatic 21-17 playoff victory over the Chicago Bears.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2003 | By Nathaniel Friedman FOR THE INQUIRER
In this Eminem-saturated climate, the white emcee is hardly the scorned figure he once was. As hip-hop becomes an increasingly portable culture, racial baggage has never been less of an issue; where you are is becoming more important than how you got there. That only makes more quizzical the shamelessly geeky, Ivy League-educated stylings of MC Paul Barman. Discovered by visionary producer Prince Paul in 1999, the Brown graduate has let his background shape his music, rather than let an affinity for hip-hop dictate his identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1995 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Some productions sound better in the conception than they succeed in the execution, although why this should be is not always clear. Consider, for instance, Travels With My Aunt, in which four actors take 23 roles in Graham Greene's 1969 comic novel about an eccentric old woman and her staid, prim nephew. Giles Havergal's adaptation, a hit in London, opened last night at the Minetta Lane with Jim Dale and Brian Murray heading the busy little cast. You may remember Travels With My Aunt from the 1972 George Cukor film starring Maggie Smith and Alec McCowen.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Dael Orlandersmith is a force of nature, a gold-braided typhoon tossing scraps of memory and emotion around like matchsticks. She's a ghetto griot, a spellbinding shaman conjuring up people so fully formed that their struggles with a harsh, fatally seductive world seem nothing less than the stuff of epic. And she's a poetic sybarite, a black, female Walt Whitman drunk with the power of words to pummel like fists or caress like swaths of silk. She is all this and a good deal more in The Gimmick, her one-woman show on view through Sunday on the capacious stage of the McCarter Theatre, which becomes McCarter's "second stage" when outfitted with a small playing area fronting rows of seats.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1993 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Let us be mercifully brief about this. Steven Berkoff's Kvetch, which the Vox Theatre Company is presenting through Nov. 7 at the Walnut Street Theatre's Studio 3, is a gimmick-driven comedy of a particularly nasty and repellent hue. The fact that it has actually found admirers in both this country and England is a sad commentary on a theater virtually bereft of genuine satire. Kvetch has to do with Frank, a woebegone, middle-aged fabric salesman; Donna, his sex-starved wife; Hal, one of Frank's co-workers; George, an overbearing customer, and Donna's nameless mother, whose belching and flatulence inspire much of the play's putative humor.
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | By S. A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Coming soon to the mailboxes of 300,000 Democrats in New Jersey is a package of advertisements that portray U.S. Rep. James J. Florio as "a packaged" Democratic candidate for governor. The campaign gimmick, which will be accompanied by radio and television ads in the New York and Philadelphia markets, was unveiled yesterday by Assemblyman Alan J. Karcher of Middlesex County, Florio's chief opponent in the June 6 primary. Karcher's ads, attacking Florio as a candidate beholden to New Jersey's 21 Democratic county chairmen, and special-interest groups such as the insurance industry and the gun lobby, feature a bright yellow cereal box with an unflattering characterization of the eight-term congressman from Camden County.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
I admit, I was quite horrified - like, shaken to my very core - by Unfriended , a horror pic with a new gimmick that likely will spawn an entire subgenre of more substandard rubbish. Unfriended unfolds entirely on a computer screen, the story and dialogue taking place among characters engaged in multiple acts of multiple-partner Skyping, Facebooking, and Googling. Possibly the single most uncinematic device ever used in a film, the gimmick must have made the studio suits jump with joy. Talk about low overhead!
NEWS
May 1, 2008
HOW DO YOU spell relief? It isn't "Federal Gas Tax Holiday," no matter what presidential candidates John McCain or Hillary Clinton say. In the first place, this gimmick - removing the 18.4 cents a gallon federal excise tax for the summer - simply isn't going to happen. There's less than a month until Memorial Day, not enough time for Congress to act. Even if it did, imagine the administrative nightmare of turning off $10 billion in gas tax collections for three months and then turning them back on. Except, of course, some politicians would call reinstating it a tax increase.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2001 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Dael Orlandersmith was raised in East Harlem. Although she says her impressive one-woman show The Gimmick, which is set in that neighborhood, is fictional, she concedes that some of it is derived from her own experiences. A part that is, one suspects, is the lead character's discovery as a young teenager of the power and beauty of language and the realization that she wants to be a writer. The Gimmick - which is being presented at the Wilma Theater as the concluding show in the Wilma 2 series - does, indeed, demonstrate that coming from the same environment, Orlandersmith herself certainly developed into an extraordinary writer.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
I admit, I was quite horrified - like, shaken to my very core - by Unfriended , a horror pic with a new gimmick that likely will spawn an entire subgenre of more substandard rubbish. Unfriended unfolds entirely on a computer screen, the story and dialogue taking place among characters engaged in multiple acts of multiple-partner Skyping, Facebooking, and Googling. Possibly the single most uncinematic device ever used in a film, the gimmick must have made the studio suits jump with joy. Talk about low overhead!
SPORTS
October 26, 2013 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bernard Hopkins tucked the gray alien mask back inside his small black gym bag. He would reveal a second one - bright green with black eyes - a few hours later in a television interview. Before he finished working out last week at Joe Hand Gym, the 48-year-old world champion said he had proof that he was an alien. Blood work and a stress test, Hopkins said, were enough for a doctor to identify him as an extraterrestrial. Perhaps boxing's oldest champion was becoming a bit distracted with his new gimmick as he prepared for Saturday's International Boxing Federation light-heavyweight title defense at Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
When the Internet read about EgoPo Classic Theatre's reimagining of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin: An Unfortunate History in January, it issued a collective groan. The gimmick - reverse racial casting, white actors playing blacks, black actors playing whites - seemed designed to inflame. Was this some "post-racial" commentary on Obama's America? Was it EgoPo's attempt to fill a "Tom show" minstrel slot in their vaudeville-themed season? Director Lane Savadove fed speculation with naive blog posts claiming he had recently "discovered" the 1852 novel that has confounded and captivated public figures from Abraham Lincoln to Henry Louis Gates Jr., and whose title character's name Malcolm X slung at the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in one of the most divisive racial slurs of the 20th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2013 | By Howard Gensler
SO, TATTLE was watching the Billboard Music Awards on Sunday night when an important cultural shift took place. Justin Bieber got booed. And he didn't take it well. The Biebs, you see, fashions himself an artist. "I'm 19 years old," an obviously stunned Bieber said accepting the first-ever Milestone Award. "This is not a gimmick. I'm an artist and I should be taken seriously and all this other bull should not be spoken of. I want to thank my manager, Scooter Braun . I want to thank my family at home.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2011 | By Roger Moore, Orlando Sentinel
The scratch-and-sniff "Aroma-Scope" gimmick of Spy Kids: All the Time in the World in 4D didn't work. Maybe I got a defective card, but the scents you're supposed to sample when the number flashes on the screen and you scratch the corresponding number on your card all smelled like burned artificial blueberry syrup. So take away one "D" from this "4D" movie, one gimmick from a gimmick-laden kiddie comedy from the Robert Rodriguez Spy Kids factory. Gadgets, cheese puffs, and diapers fly off the screen in the cheesiest kid-friendly 3-D tradition.
NEWS
July 26, 2011
By Michael Silverstein Washington's big new idea for keeping Social Security solvent, while saving the government about $300 billion over 10 years, is something called the "chained CPI. " It could soon replace the standard measure of inflation - the consumer price index, or CPI - long used to keep seniors' real-world benefits from being whittled away by price increases. The new yardstick would virtually guarantee that future Social Security cost-of-living adjustments will be smaller than if the standard CPI were used.
SPORTS
January 4, 2011 | By Les Bowen
MAYBE MICHAEL VICK was just trying to project confidence yesterday. What came across was closer to cluelessness. It was hard to leave Vick's brief session with reporters at NovaCare feeling like the Eagles' quarterback understands and appreciates the adjustments defenses have made over his last half-dozen games, or that he plans to do anything differently. "I don't think we have to make changes," said Vick, who threw no interceptions in his first seven appearances this year, then threw six in his last five.
SPORTS
October 15, 2009
BOBBY JACKSON had a short NFL career - only two seasons - but the d-back from Alabama holds a special place in Eagles lore. Generously listed as 6-1, 190 pounds, Jackson's first and only season with the Eagles was 1960. He was a defensive back on that NFL championship squad, the last Eagles team to bring home the title. He played in all 12 regular-season games that year, not doing a whole bunch to distinguish himself. But in the title game against Green Bay on Dec. 26, Jackson had a hand in the final play of the season.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2009 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once you read the title, you've pretty much seen the movie. The Invention of Lying is just what it sounds like: a fable about an alternate world in which everyone tells the absolute truth. As the narrator observes, "No deceit, no flattery, no fiction. " It's hardly a utopia because no one is capable of masking unhappiness or insecurities. As a waiter approaches a table, he doesn't open with, "My name is Chad. I'll be your server tonight. " Instead he blurts out, "I'm very embarrassed I work here.
FOOD
March 26, 2009 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
I wasn't sure what the salt shaker was for at first. It came in the mail with a pepper shaker, and it had an I N.Y. logo on it. It was sent by an outfit called The Center for Consumer Freedom. With an ecru-colored gift card. "Congratulations!", it said, "You're now on the cutting edge of New York City culinary culture. " Then the card got down to business: It said that if New York Health Commissioner Thomas Frieden put in place his 10-year plan to remove 50 percent of the salt "from all restaurant meals," two things would happen.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|