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Gin

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NEWS
May 5, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Some people may think it's a shameful waste, but a shot of gin will do wonders to perk up a drooping bouquet of flowers. The main ingredient in a Tom Collins or a Singapore Sling will particularly perk up tulips and other bulbs, say those who've tried it. "Absolutely. It works," said Ruth Holmstrom, a San Jose, Calif., flower show judge who also teaches flower arranging. "When I took floral design classes at College of San Mateo, the instructor advised using about a half-cup of gin with tulips.
NEWS
February 21, 2005 | By Sabatino Mangini
My right leg went numb. Then a pulsing thunderstorm of pain shock-waved through my body. I writhed in agony on a fresh-cut field of grass; I knew I was in trouble. I had shattered my leg in three places. My high school soccer season was over. Relegated to a hospital bed, I realized I'd never play scholastic soccer again. This revelation was more debilitating than the actual injury to my tibia and fibula. Throughout my childhood and teen years, soccer had been my identity. I had always been my team's leading scorer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | Cheap Buzz
BUZZ: It's summertime again, so everybody's drinking gin-and-tonics. Ugh. Why anybody would drink something that smells like Pine-Sol is beyond me. Makes me queasy just thinking about it. Marnie: Believe it or not, Buzz, modern gin traces its roots to a 17th-century Dutch remedy for upset stomachs, among other ailments. Alcoholic tinctures of botanical ingredients were common medicines. Juniper berries were thought to help kidney problems, gallstones and the gout, too. Buzz: So how come people still drink it?
NEWS
June 19, 2011
Keep your liquor cabinet's top shelf in the loop with these latest arrivals from the West Coast's craft spirit scene, the exceptional gin and silky smooth wheat whiskey from Dry Fly in Spokane, Wash. Recently named "Distiller of the Year" by the American Distilling Institute, and newly available in Pennsylvania, Dry Fly has come a long way since it was founded four years ago by two pals on a fishing trip who ditched their corporate jobs to make artisan booze from local ingredients.
NEWS
September 30, 1988 | By Tom Fox, Inquirer Editorial Board
Ruth Udstad Fertel is a gin rummy player. She always has been, ever since she was a wee lass in Happy Jack, La., a bend in the mighty Mississippi about 40 miles south of New Orleans. Happy Jack is named for a peddler who worked the river road selling pots and pans. Because he was always smiling, his customers called him Happy Jack and when the little settlement in the bend of the river was incorporated, the residents named the town Happy Jack. Happy Jack is peopled by fisherman and trappers, most of them Czech, but Ruth Fertel is neither fisherman or trapper.
NEWS
April 6, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
It was a fellow by the musical name of Manuel Roig-Franzia who introduced me to the Negroni, the most elegant - and unquestionably most adult, and certifiably legendary - classic cocktail (an aperitif, if you will) that you've likely never had the sweet pleasure of meeting. Even at the Swann Lounge in the Four Seasons Hotel, hardly known for edginess, they mix them about one to 500; that would be one Negroni ordered a week, versus 500 vodka martinis and their ilk. So finding a bartender sensitive to its subtleties is no simple matter: The Negroni, on paper, is neatly gin, sweet vermouth and Campari, equal parts, stirred on ice and strained, with a twist of lemon, or fresh orange, or for fancier presentations, perhaps freshly burnt orange.
FOOD
November 17, 1996 | By Kathy Casey, FOR THE INQUIRER
The cocktail culture is truly upon us - from the resurgence of the martini to the exploding popularity of mood music. According to author Barnaby Conrad 3d, "Bartenders across the country report that the martini is once again the favorite mixed drink in America. " Whether gin or vodka, this ritualistically blended drink seems to be all the rage. Like past generations seen sipping martinis in their smoking jackets and cocktail dresses - as in the film Breakfast at Tiffany's, today's twenty-, thirty- and fortysomethings are dressing up and stepping out. Previously shunned naughties such as cocktails and steak are again fashionable.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2011
This punch, by Phoebe Esmon at The Farmers' Cabinet, calls for local gin and absinthe from Philadelphia Distillers. Says Esmon, "Remember, punch isn't just an easier way to binge-drink. It's designed to sit on ice, instead of being shaken, where it can slowly dilute. " THE CONTRARIAN 6 ounces Bluecoat gin 3 ounces lemon juice, fresh squeezed 2 1/2 ounces simple syrup 1 ounce Vieux Carre Absinthe 16 dashes Peychaud's bitters 6 ounces club soda or sparkling mineral water Ice Lemon wheels In a punch bowl, add the gin, absinthe, simple syrup, lemon juice, bitters, and club soda and stir well.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
Is there a Philly barman more eccentric yet talented than the singularly-named Lêe, the cufflinked, outspoken owner of Chinatown's Hop Sing Laundromat? True, the pre-opening hype, paired with the doorman's "holding room" lecture on the, ahem, laundry list of rules (no tennis shoes, no photos), leaves some cocktailians cool. But once inside the low-lit room, with its nickel-plated bar and well-spaced tables, Hop Sing's virtues are undeniable. The top-shelf liquor collection is awesome (100 bourbons; 65 gins)
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " No one can say I did not try. I spent an entire afternoon giving my children a lesson in what I would like for my Mother's Day meal. But did I get miso-marinated cod with mushroom risotto? Of course not. Since my oldest son was the only one able to make it home, my husband pitched in. And what did they make? Chicken fajitas. Well, I do love chicken fajitas. And Tim added his first blog post. Tim: My mom asked me to take over blogging duties for my sister who is heading to medical school in July (congratulations Sally!
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 2, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Editor's Note: This column is sponsored by TD Bank. The opinions and analysis expressed here reflect the views of the authors alone, and do not necessarily reflect the views of TD Bank, N.A. or its affiliates. Talk about mother-in-law problems. Joe Maiellano, proud graduate of Northeast High School and the University of Pennsylvania, is finding himself on an entrepreneurial high. The kit to make homemade gin that he and wife Sarah (Kapenstein when she was at Northeast High)
NEWS
December 16, 2012
'We're the distillery of unseen things," says Meredith Grelli. And she isn't kidding. First came the "Monongahela rye" that Wigle, her family's new craft distillery in Pittsburgh, debuted earlier this year to reclaim Pennsylvania's colonial heritage as a rye center (with Dad's Hat in Bristol also joining the push). Now comes Wigle's Ginever, a take on the proto-gin popularized by the 18th-century Dutch that, in contrast to the crisper English style made with neutral spirits, uses fuller-bodied grain whiskey as its base.
NEWS
November 19, 2012
Is there a Philly barman more eccentric yet talented than the singularly-named Lêe, the cufflinked, outspoken owner of Chinatown's Hop Sing Laundromat? True, the pre-opening hype, paired with the doorman's "holding room" lecture on the, ahem, laundry list of rules (no tennis shoes, no photos), leaves some cocktailians cool. But once inside the low-lit room, with its nickel-plated bar and well-spaced tables, Hop Sing's virtues are undeniable. The top-shelf liquor collection is awesome (100 bourbons; 65 gins)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | Cheap Buzz
BUZZ: It's summertime again, so everybody's drinking gin-and-tonics. Ugh. Why anybody would drink something that smells like Pine-Sol is beyond me. Makes me queasy just thinking about it. Marnie: Believe it or not, Buzz, modern gin traces its roots to a 17th-century Dutch remedy for upset stomachs, among other ailments. Alcoholic tinctures of botanical ingredients were common medicines. Juniper berries were thought to help kidney problems, gallstones and the gout, too. Buzz: So how come people still drink it?
NEWS
May 17, 2012 | By Maureen Fitzgerald
Here is an excerpt from the blog "My Daughter's Kitchen. " No one can say I did not try. I spent an entire afternoon giving my children a lesson in what I would like for my Mother's Day meal. But did I get miso-marinated cod with mushroom risotto? Of course not. Since my oldest son was the only one able to make it home, my husband pitched in. And what did they make? Chicken fajitas. Well, I do love chicken fajitas. And Tim added his first blog post. Tim: My mom asked me to take over blogging duties for my sister who is heading to medical school in July (congratulations Sally!
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2011
This punch, by Phoebe Esmon at The Farmers' Cabinet, calls for local gin and absinthe from Philadelphia Distillers. Says Esmon, "Remember, punch isn't just an easier way to binge-drink. It's designed to sit on ice, instead of being shaken, where it can slowly dilute. " THE CONTRARIAN 6 ounces Bluecoat gin 3 ounces lemon juice, fresh squeezed 2 1/2 ounces simple syrup 1 ounce Vieux Carre Absinthe 16 dashes Peychaud's bitters 6 ounces club soda or sparkling mineral water Ice Lemon wheels In a punch bowl, add the gin, absinthe, simple syrup, lemon juice, bitters, and club soda and stir well.
NEWS
June 19, 2011
Keep your liquor cabinet's top shelf in the loop with these latest arrivals from the West Coast's craft spirit scene, the exceptional gin and silky smooth wheat whiskey from Dry Fly in Spokane, Wash. Recently named "Distiller of the Year" by the American Distilling Institute, and newly available in Pennsylvania, Dry Fly has come a long way since it was founded four years ago by two pals on a fishing trip who ditched their corporate jobs to make artisan booze from local ingredients.
NEWS
May 15, 2011
By nature, drinkers tend to move away from brown spirits when the warm weather hits. But here's a cocktail that, thanks to the unsung magic of Metaxa, manages to be dark and breezy at the same time: the Bekris. The folks at Opa, channeling all things Greek, have given a Hellenic twist to the Old Fashioned with this clever combo that mixes the lightly sweet, raisiny kiss of five-star Metaxa brandy with an herbaceous splash of Bluecoat gin for a lightening effect, then a smack of Angostura and Fee Bros.
NEWS
May 4, 2011 | By Bill Hollenbach
In George Orwell's 1984 , they are the "proles. " In America, they are the underclass. In Philadelphia, they are the students. Orwell's nightmarish novel described a one-party state whose people were treated as a pent-up herd. That may sound like a quaint vision of a future abandoned on the highway of history, but take a look in the rearview mirror: It's gaining on us. Philadelphia is facing a $377 million cut in state aid to its schools. According to the School District, that will mean laying off 1,260 teachers and 1,281 other employees - aides, custodians, counselors, and nurses.
NEWS
April 3, 2011 | By Michael Smerconish
For years, my family has vacationed in the same Florida town. In fact, we just returned home after spending a week of spring break there with our three sons. Many nights, we take the same scenic drive to dinner at a favorite restaurant. As we travel along Gulf Shore Boulevard, we admire a combination of small beach apartments, swanky high-rises, and spectacular homes. A few years ago, we noticed that whenever we drive this particular route, there are always two men sitting in front of the same third-floor window of a low-rise apartment building that overlooks the road.
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