CollectionsGiselle
IN THE NEWS

Giselle

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1990 | By Janet Anderson, Special to the Daily News
The Pennsylvania Ballet's production of "Giselle," which opened last night at the Academy of Music, is curiously low-key for such a flamboyant old ballet warhorse. After all, this is the story of a village maiden done wrong by a visiting prince, who fails to tell her that he's already pledged to someone else back at the castle. The story, corny as it is, remains important to the ballet, because it is truly pivotal to the dancing. Giselle, the maiden in question, goes mad and dies when she discovers her betrayal.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1988 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
Love betrayed, loved redeemed in the eerie mist of a graveyard: The story of Giselle is among the most moving in ballet, and again it worked its charms when the Pennsylvania and Milwaukee Ballet opened a two-week run of the classic Wednesday at the Shubert Theater. Among its charms is its urgency. One always hopes that this time, Count Albrecht will explain his true identity to the peasant Giselle before Hilarion unmasks him, thus preventing her descent into madness and transformation into a ghostly Wili.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1998 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Ballet will open its 35th season with a bit of the old and a bit of the new - the enduring romance of Giselle and a program combining three world premieres. The lights come up at the Merriam Theater on Oct. 14 for a two-week run of Giselle, which has been called the Hamlet of classical dance, both for its age-to-age appeal and its depiction of eerie, spectral madness. The old French story, put to music by Adolphe Adam, tells of young girls who die before their wedding day - then rise from their graves each evening to cavort in the moonlight.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
Giselle is the most perfect story ballet in existence, because dance and drama are perfectly fused. Hardly is there a moment of choreography that doesn't also further the narrative line. The story itself is also wonderful. About a count's betrayal of an innocent maiden, it touches the heart in a more direct way than the allegorical Tchaikovsky ballets, Swan Lake and Sleeping Beauty. Even the Girl Scouts' ballet battalion could make a go of Giselle, so irresistible is the ballet.
NEWS
February 6, 2007 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
Giselle is one of the most popular ballets of all time. Yet until Friday night, the Pennsylvania Ballet hadn't danced it for nine years. It was worth the wait. The company looked better than it had in a long time. Choreographed by Marius Petipa after Jean Coralli and Jules Perrot, Giselle is one of the great Romantic ballets and a notoriously difficult one to dance. But the Pennsylvania Ballet rose to the occasion. It is the story of a peasant girl who loves to dance, despite a weak heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2007 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
'GISELLE," THE first great Romantic ballet and still a staple of the repertory, returns here for the first time in 13 years, thanks to the Pennsylvania Ballet. Though this sumptuous work debuted in 1841 Paris, the standard choreography is the production staged by Marius Petipa in Russia nearly 50 years later. It demands enormous skill, thus it can only be attempted by a superior company. If "Giselle" isn't as well-known as Tchaikovsky's "Swan Lake" or Stravinsky's "Firebird," that's only because Adolphe Adam's score isn't familiar symphony-orchestra repertoire.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Ellen Dunkel, For The Inquirer
Pennsylvania Ballet opened its 49th season with Giselle Thursday night at the Academy of Music and made it clear why the work has such staying power. One of the world's most frequently performed ballets (with Nutcracker and Swan Lake ), Giselle was choreographed in 1841 by Jean Coralli and Jules Perrot, and reworked several times by Marius Petipa. It is breathtakingly beautiful, from the courtyard scene to the romantic pas de deux to the lush corps de ballet in long puffs of white tulle to the memorable Adolphe Adam score.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1995 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The dance has usually come before the dancer in the Pennsylvania Ballet's aesthetic, but in the company's current performances of Giselle, the rules turn upside down. These performances at the Merriam Theater feature Tamara Hadley in the title role, and her imminent retirement has thrust her into the center of attention. Far from being the whole point, the ballet has become the frame around a quaint romantic scene, the setting for her final performances. The company has mounted this work only three times in its history, and in her 20 years here, Hadley has danced the title role each time.
NEWS
April 7, 1988 | By DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer
When she's not writing about ballet, an acid-tongued Brit named Kay Ambrose paints ballerinas on the noses of jet bombers. I find that attractive. So naturally I consulted her "Ballet-Lover's Companion" before attending last night's opening of the Pennsylvania and Milwaukee Ballet's rendition of the romantic 19th-century classic, "Giselle. " Ambrose writes that although you can wow 'em in "Swan Lake" on technical merit alone, you gotta have heart to sell "Giselle. " "A Giselle who has only technique and no emotional capability," she advises, "is a theatrical and artistic atrocity.
NEWS
December 6, 1987 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Joanne Marino, 17, stood on tiptoe with her arms extended above her head, waiting for the music to change, a signal for her to leap across the stage. "OK - right here. Go to the andante. Skip this section," conductor Richard Wilhelm shouted to the orchestra. Some of Wilhelm's musicians followed his lead, while others continued without skipping. A few, looking bewildered, stopped altogether. Wilhelm dropped his arms in frustration and Marino was caught in midleap as the music died down.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 12, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I have been divorced for a year and have two boys, ages 8 and 9. During this time, my ex-husband has introduced three different women to my children and recently introduced them to a new girlfriend he has been seeing for a few weeks. The first day they met the girlfriend, he had the children spend the night at her place. The woman has a 9-year-old son I do not find this appropriate. When I confronted my ex, he insisted that there was no problem with it. How long do you recommend someone wait before introducing children to the person he/she is dating?
NEWS
August 22, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Geralyn Winner Roden, 80, of Huntingdon Valley, whose life revolved around her family, home and beautiful gardens, died Wednesday, Aug. 19, of a hemorrhage at Abington Hospice Warminster. Born to Edwin and Pearl Winner in 1934 in Abington, Mrs. Roden graduated from Abington Friends School and attended Bennington College. "Things were different back then," Mrs. Roden recalled in the 50th reunion book for Bennington's Class of 1956. "Parents just dropped us off and vanished after unloading our meager belongings.
NEWS
October 21, 2012 | By Ellen Dunkel, For The Inquirer
Pennsylvania Ballet opened its 49th season with Giselle Thursday night at the Academy of Music and made it clear why the work has such staying power. One of the world's most frequently performed ballets (with Nutcracker and Swan Lake ), Giselle was choreographed in 1841 by Jean Coralli and Jules Perrot, and reworked several times by Marius Petipa. It is breathtakingly beautiful, from the courtyard scene to the romantic pas de deux to the lush corps de ballet in long puffs of white tulle to the memorable Adolphe Adam score.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2007 | By GLENN WHIPP Los Angeles Daily News
Disney princesses always seem like they're having so much fun (when they're not being orphaned or chased by evil henchmen) that Amy Adams figured playing one would be something of a cinch. Little did she know how tiring enforced cheerfulness could be. "I was pooped," Adams says, recalling her first couple of weeks playing Giselle, an animated princess who comes to life in New York City in Disney's new movie "Enchanted," which opened Wednesday. "I'd have days coming to the set in no mood to be the happy princess," Adams says.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There's a word for women like Giselle: Supercalifragilistic. Ditto her film, Enchanted. A cartoon princess from the fairy-tale kingdom of Andalasia, Giselle falls down a well, comes up a sewer, and lifts a manhole cover to find herself - now made of flesh and blood - smack in the middle of Broadway. Both in the geographical and musical meanings of the word. Amid the hectic rush and rudeness of this Whole New World, the pilgrim in white taffeta remains undaunted in her quest for True Love's Kiss, which inspires her to song.
NEWS
November 21, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
There's a word for women like Giselle: Supercalifragilistic. Ditto her film, Enchanted. A cartoon princess from the fairy-tale kingdom of Andalasia, Giselle falls down a well, comes up through a sewer, and lifts a manhole cover to find herself - now made of flesh and blood - smack in the middle of Broadway. Both in the geographical and musical meanings of the word. Amid the hectic rush and rudeness of this Whole New World, the pilgrim in white taffeta remains undaunted in her quest for True Love's Kiss, which inspires her to song.
NEWS
February 6, 2007 | By Ellen Dunkel FOR THE INQUIRER
Giselle is one of the most popular ballets of all time. Yet until Friday night, the Pennsylvania Ballet hadn't danced it for nine years. It was worth the wait. The company looked better than it had in a long time. Choreographed by Marius Petipa after Jean Coralli and Jules Perrot, Giselle is one of the great Romantic ballets and a notoriously difficult one to dance. But the Pennsylvania Ballet rose to the occasion. It is the story of a peasant girl who loves to dance, despite a weak heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2007 | By TOM DI NARDO For the Daily News
'GISELLE," THE first great Romantic ballet and still a staple of the repertory, returns here for the first time in 13 years, thanks to the Pennsylvania Ballet. Though this sumptuous work debuted in 1841 Paris, the standard choreography is the production staged by Marius Petipa in Russia nearly 50 years later. It demands enormous skill, thus it can only be attempted by a superior company. If "Giselle" isn't as well-known as Tchaikovsky's "Swan Lake" or Stravinsky's "Firebird," that's only because Adolphe Adam's score isn't familiar symphony-orchestra repertoire.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|