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NEWS
June 24, 2005 | Kathleen Parker
Kathleen Parker is a columnist for the Orlando Sentinel By now, we can concede that America's prison camp at Guant?namo Bay, Cuba, is not a torture-driven gulag and that Sen. Dick Durbin (D., Ill.) was wrong to draw that comparison. As for his comparison of Guant?namo ("Gitmo") to Stalin's gulags, Hitler's concentration camps, and Pol Pot's human-skull pyramids, one can only surmise that the Illinois senator suffered a temporary fugue or a bout of Tourette's. The problem with Durbin's rhetorical excess, meanwhile, was that he made it easy - and wrong - to dismiss any and all concerns about prisoner treatment at Gitmo and elsewhere.
NEWS
December 11, 2010
With their vote Wednesday to effectively halt President Obama's effort to shutter the Guantanamo Bay prison for terror suspects, U.S. House members of both parties no doubt took a stand that they regard as necessary to safeguard the nation. It's likely, though, that it could have the opposite impact. There's certainly no doubt that the decision to retain Guantanamo comes with a steep price in the continued erosion of American prestige. As long as U.S. policy is for the open-ended detention of terror suspects who have little prospect of their day in court, the nation fails to live up to its core democratic values.
NEWS
June 10, 2005
MICHELLE Malkin's (column, June 6) advise to us that most abuses at Guantanamo have been fabricated is made problematic by the Bush administration's refusal to grant habeas corpus to any of the detainees. Reports of abuse verified by the United States military can hardly be ridiculed as fabrications. The involvement of Attorney General Alberto Gonzalez in justifying torture abroad and torture by proxy has been an embarassment and a disgrace. The notion that prisoners already incarcerated for three years have information of such urgent necessity as to justify continued mistreatment and isolation is the kind of sociopathic paranoia more appropriate for television fiction like "24" than for living in the real world.
NEWS
June 6, 2005
WHEN NEWSWEEK mistakenly reported that a copy of the Quran was flushed down a toilet by military personnel in Guantanamo Bay prison - helping to spark deadly riots in the Middle East - the magazine quickly and publicly retracted the story and apologized. But that didn't stop the Bush White House and its pundit flunkies from playing Whack-A-Mole with Newsweek as chief mole. Yet apparently Newsweek had little to apologize for. Unlike the magazine, which owned up to its mistake, this administration admits error only when it knows no one is paying attention.
NEWS
June 17, 2008
It's hard to summarize a decision as long and complicated as the Supreme Court's 5-4 ruling in Boumediene v. Bush. But we can try. Unprecedented. Reckless. Harmful. Breathtakingly condescending. . . . The upshot is the prisoners at Camp Delta can now file habeas corpus petitions in U.S. district courts seeking reprieve. Hence, lawyers, judges, and left-wing interest groups will have real influence over the conduct of the war on terror. Call it the Gitmo nightmare. - Matthew Continetti on www.weeklystandard.
NEWS
June 8, 2004 | By Dom Giordano
When you hear the words Guantanamo Bay, the words Abu Ghraib seem to echo back. But I was in Guantanamo for three days last week, and I saw something very different. I concluded that, at Gitmo, we extract information from prisoners not by torture but by developing rapport with them. It involves amenities. Full rolls of toilet paper. Fruit baskets. A field trip barbecue. I talked to prisoners, visited cell blocks, surveyed their medical care, interviewed the base commander and chief interrogator on my show, and allowed callers to probe them with questions.
NEWS
June 6, 2005 | MICHELLE MALKIN
THE MAINSTREAM media and international human rights organizations have relentlessly portrayed the Guantanamo Bay detention facility as a depraved torture chamber operated by sadistic American military officials defiling Islam at every turn. It's the "gulag of our time," wails Amnesty International. It's the "anti-Statue of Liberty," bemoans New York Times columnist Tom Friedman. Have there been abuses? Yes. But here's the rest of the story, the part Islamists and their sympathizers don't want you to hear.
NEWS
July 3, 2005
Replacing O'Connor Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's retirement came as a great surprise. She should be commended, because for the most part, she judged from the American mainstream. I would hope with that in mind, President Bush consults with both parties in the Senate to find a similar replacement. However, after following this administration over the last 4 1/2 years, I don't have much confidence in that happening. Steven M. Clayton Ocean, N.J. Opening for the right Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, the swing vote on a vastly polarized Supreme Court, is leaving, and the far right is popping open the champagne bottles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2002 | By JOHN F. MORRISON morrisj@phillynews.com Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WELL, WE KNOW what Pat Croce's next venture will be. Look for an announcement next week that the former Sixers president - and current NBC/NBA analyst - is a partner in Slamball, which he's been telling friends is "the first X-Games team sport," Stu Bykofsky reports. It will make its debut on TNN this summer. Slamball is played on a "revolutionary trampoline and spring-loaded surface" combining the "fast-court action of basketball with elements of football, hockey and soccer," says an inside source.
NEWS
January 28, 2010
Keep Guantanamo open for business Re: "Must close Guantanamo," Tuesday: Your rationale for closing Gitmo is as flawed and naive as your position in support of holding the terror trials in New York. You said closing the prison in Cuba would deprive al-Qaeda and other terrorist conspirators of a potent recruiting tool. Nowhere is that statement supported by any credible facts. The Council on Foreign Relations said, "Guantanamo's initial operational problems have long been worked out, and the prison is now expertly run by the military in a humane way that is consistent with international legal standards.
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NEWS
March 30, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
As an 18-year-old military police officer at Guantánamo Bay's prison, Erica Walsh was one of the few women tasked with guarding detainees. Some were terror suspects linked to the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks - the same attacks that spurred Walsh to enlist. For 12 hours a day, they rained down abuse on her from their cells. But Walsh, a Montgomery County resident, who admits she cried as a child when she saw roadkill, developed a thick skin and inner strength. Her fortitude grew at similar posts in Iraq and at the maximum security prison at Fort Leavenworth, Kan. "Being a woman in a man's army, people are constantly nay-saying you," said Walsh, who served for eight years in the Army and now studies health and physical education as a junior at West Chester University.
NEWS
November 18, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside Courtroom II at Camp Justice on the sprawling Guantanamo Bay base in Cuba, eight visitors filed into a glass-protected gallery. It was a little after 9 a.m. on Oct. 22, before the start of a hearing for five men accused of plotting attacks in the United States. Jim Jenca, a 52-year-old married father of two from Levittown, took a seat in the front row. A big ex-Marine with a florid, round face, he couldn't sit still. Restless, he stood up. He put his face close to the glass partition.
NEWS
July 16, 2013 | By Carol Rosenberg, THE MIAMI HERALD
MIAMI - Twenty-five Guantanamo prisoners have quit their hunger strike during Ramadan, according to the U.S. military, which reported Sunday that Navy medical staff still considered 45 captives sufficiently malnourished to require forced feeding. Prison spokesmen suggested they had broken part of the protest by adopting a new policy: Captives had to abandon their five-month-old hunger strike to live in communal detention - where they can pray and eat in groups - after months alone in maximum-security lockdown.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Donna Cassata and Richard Lardner, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The House overwhelmingly passed a sweeping, $638 billion defense bill on Friday that imposes new punishments on members of the armed services found guilty of rape or sexual assault as outrage over the crisis in the military has galvanized Congress. Ignoring a White House veto threat, the Republican-controlled House voted 315-108 for the legislation, which would block President Obama from closing the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and limit his efforts to reduce nuclear weapons.
NEWS
June 5, 2013 | By Richard Lardner and Donna Cassata, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Rebuffing President Obama's latest plea, House Republicans on Monday proposed keeping open the military-run prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by barring the administration from transferring its terror suspects to the United States or a foreign country such as Yemen. The provisions dealing with the fate of the remaining 166 prisoners are part of a defense policy bill drafted by Armed Services Committee Chairman Howard P. "Buck" McKeon (R., Calif.). The chairman released the bill Monday, two days before the committee is to vote on it. Overall, the bill would authorize $638 billion for the military in the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, including $86 billion for war costs.
NEWS
May 14, 2013
Prescription for women's safety Having read in vivid detail the trial testimony about the alleged shop of horrors run by abortionist Kermit Gosnell, I wonder when we as a society will realize that proactive, universal policies that enable women to avoid unwanted pregnancies must be a priority. Policies that mandate timely sex education for our teens, including options such as abstinence and uninhibited access to birth-control for young men and women, are socially responsible actions that we must take to ensure that early and especially late-term abortions are minimized or eliminated.
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Cynthia Tucker
Sometimes the absurdities of an official policy or action are so clear that they need not be elucidated. Such is the case with the Obama administration's maintenance of the U.S. detention facility at Guantanamo Bay. Last week, President Obama told reporters that he intends to once again press Congress to close the facility, as he had promised to do in his first campaign. But there is no indication that the president intends to devote any of his remaining political capital to the task - any more than he did during his first term.
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Charles Krauthammer
In choice of both topic and foil, Rand Paul's now legendary Senate filibuster was a stroke of political genius. The topic was, ostensibly, very narrow: Does the president have the constitutional authority to put a drone-launched Hellfire missile through your kitchen - you, a good citizen of Topeka to whom POTUS might have taken a dislike - while you're cooking up a pot roast? The constituency of those who could not give this question a straight answer is exceedingly small. Unfortunately, among them is Attorney General Eric Holder.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Carol Rosenberg, Miami Herald
MIAMI - The detainee found dead in a maximum-security cell at Guantanamo was a Yemeni captive with a history of suicide attempts who at one time had won a federal judge's release order, only to see his case overturned on appeal and rejected by the U.S. Supreme Court. The detention center on Tuesday identified the dead captive as Adnan Farhan Abdul Latif, in his 30s, held since January 2002 as prisoner No. 156. Latif was found unconscious in his cell Saturday afternoon, the military said.
NEWS
May 4, 2012 | McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - The public should be allowed to hear the five alleged 9/11 conspirators describe what the CIA did to them in secret overseas prisons, the American Civil Liberties Union said in a motion filed at the Guantanamo war court late Wednesday. "The eyes of the world are on this military commission," the civil liberties group wrote in its motion. It was posted on the court website uncensored and included graphic references to water torture from a leaked International Red Cross report.
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