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NEWS
February 10, 2002 | By Marsha Canfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Claude Monet first saw the village of Giverny from the window of a train. Monet, not yet renowned as the foremost impressionist, was instantly intrigued by the rustic ambience. He rented, and later bought, a large farmhouse in the village for his family. He stayed for 43 years, from 1883 until his death in 1926. On the grounds, he created the landscape he would later paint - wide swaths of vibrant flowers of all sizes and heights on the slope from the house toward a tributary of River Epte, which feeds into the Seine.
TRAVEL
February 2, 2014 | By Kirsten Byrne, For The Inquirer
We'd been planning the trip since Lauren was 7, soon after I heard about the Sweet 16 parties South Jersey parents threw for their girls. Elaborate occasions with multi-course meals, tributes, and even a first dance with Dad seemed more fitting for a bride than for an adolescent's coming-of-age. Soon after my own 16th birthday, I'd left home for a summer tour of Europe. I couldn't re-create that life-altering trip for Lauren, but I wanted to at least give her a taste of it. The idea came when I'd married her father 10 months after relocating from the West Coast to join his family.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
MENTION the name Claude Monet, and most people think of the acclaimed French artist whom many consider the father of Impressionism. And, while it's true that Monet's work will be prominently featured in the blockbuster show "Discovering the Impressionists: Paul Durand-Ruel and the New Painting," making its only U.S. stop at the Philadelphia Museum of Art starting June 24, Monet himself said, "My garden is my most beautiful masterpiece. " A closer study finds the man as driven by his palate as his palette.
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Ula Ilnytzky and Associated Press
NEW YORK — Claude Monet's beloved flower and water gardens in the north of France are world-famous. But for those unable to visit the artist's home, a trip to the Bronx over the next several months will offer a taste of Monet's indisputably radiant living masterpiece — a riotous display of color, plant variety, and landscape design. "Monet's Garden" at the New York Botanical Garden evokes Monet's lush garden at Giverny, the impressionist's home from 1883 until his death in 1926.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | By Ann Waldron, Special to The Inquirer
We can't see France with Claude Monet's incomparable eye - Paul Cezanne once said, "Monet is only an eye, but, my God, what an eye!" - but we can see what he saw by following the Monet Trail. The trail winds from here to Barbizon, and up and down the valley of the Seine to Le Havre, Vetheuil, Poissy, Bougival, Rouen and Giverny - to the places where Monet grew up and to the villages, countryside, riverbanks and seaside that he painted. On the Monet Trail, too, are museums, often virtually empty of visitors, where you can see critical masses of Monet's works.
NEWS
April 4, 2011 | By Maria Sudekum Fisher, Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - One of impressionist master Claude Monet's Water Lilies triptychs, separated 50 years ago and sold to three museums, has been reunited in an exhibition that highlights not only the three-panel work, but the artist as well. "I think all of us think of Monet as this father of Impressionism, as this painter who was spontaneous, who painted outdoors in his garden," said Nicole Myers, associate curator at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, where "Monet's Water Lilies " opens Saturday.
NEWS
August 17, 1989 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Diane Burko, her cuticles colorfully encrusted with dried oil paint, tugged at the steering wheel of her tiny red Renault 5, gunned the engine and shot briskly up the Rue Claude Monet - her road to "artist's heaven. " Surveying the purplish earth of the Norman countryside, fields of red- orange poppies and skies that range from azure to the color of wet cement, the 43-year-old landscape painter could only exult in her good fortune at being an artist-in-residence at Giverny. "As a teacher, I have all this knowledge of impressionism and postimpressionism," said Burko, an art professor at Community College of Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1988 | By Victoria Donohoe, Inquirer Art Critic
Jacqueline Chesley's landscape paintings at Gross McCleaf are not radical inventions by any means. Yet because they illustrate her ability to simplify elements of a vista into significant color relationships, rigorously executed like an analytical exercise, they seem almost far-out. Chesley is interested in interpreting light in terms of color, and cares nothing about movement or animated scenes. With her, freshness of color is the keynote. And in her case, landscape never was a question of every petal described.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
A painter needs either a load of confidence or a modicum of chutzpah to take on Claude Monet in his own back yard. However she primed herself for her recent six-month residency at Monet's former home in Giverny, France, Diane Burko handled the challenge admirably. Confronting what Monet saw and immortalized in his late work, Burko produced a series of landscapes that reinterpret his vision in her own fresh and distinctive language. She respects the master impressionist, but she doesn't attempt to imitate him; she's a good enough painter not to need that kind of reinforcement.
NEWS
December 19, 1995 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
Dylan Thomas recalls in "A Child's Christmas in Wales" of hearing a cry of "Fire!" one Christmas Eve from the home of neighbors, the Prothero family. After the flames had been extinguished, Miss Prothero, who "said the right thing, always," asked the firemen a bizarre question. "Would you like anything to read?" Miss Prothero's off-the-wall question is not out of place this pre- Christmas week, however, when most of us have so many holiday gifts to buy and so little time left.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY BETH D'ADDONO, For the Daily News
MENTION the name Claude Monet, and most people think of the acclaimed French artist whom many consider the father of Impressionism. And, while it's true that Monet's work will be prominently featured in the blockbuster show "Discovering the Impressionists: Paul Durand-Ruel and the New Painting," making its only U.S. stop at the Philadelphia Museum of Art starting June 24, Monet himself said, "My garden is my most beautiful masterpiece. " A closer study finds the man as driven by his palate as his palette.
TRAVEL
February 2, 2014 | By Kirsten Byrne, For The Inquirer
We'd been planning the trip since Lauren was 7, soon after I heard about the Sweet 16 parties South Jersey parents threw for their girls. Elaborate occasions with multi-course meals, tributes, and even a first dance with Dad seemed more fitting for a bride than for an adolescent's coming-of-age. Soon after my own 16th birthday, I'd left home for a summer tour of Europe. I couldn't re-create that life-altering trip for Lauren, but I wanted to at least give her a taste of it. The idea came when I'd married her father 10 months after relocating from the West Coast to join his family.
NEWS
July 29, 2012 | By Ula Ilnytzky and Associated Press
NEW YORK — Claude Monet's beloved flower and water gardens in the north of France are world-famous. But for those unable to visit the artist's home, a trip to the Bronx over the next several months will offer a taste of Monet's indisputably radiant living masterpiece — a riotous display of color, plant variety, and landscape design. "Monet's Garden" at the New York Botanical Garden evokes Monet's lush garden at Giverny, the impressionist's home from 1883 until his death in 1926.
NEWS
April 4, 2011 | By Maria Sudekum Fisher, Associated Press
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - One of impressionist master Claude Monet's Water Lilies triptychs, separated 50 years ago and sold to three museums, has been reunited in an exhibition that highlights not only the three-panel work, but the artist as well. "I think all of us think of Monet as this father of Impressionism, as this painter who was spontaneous, who painted outdoors in his garden," said Nicole Myers, associate curator at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, where "Monet's Water Lilies " opens Saturday.
NEWS
February 10, 2002 | By Marsha Canfield FOR THE INQUIRER
Claude Monet first saw the village of Giverny from the window of a train. Monet, not yet renowned as the foremost impressionist, was instantly intrigued by the rustic ambience. He rented, and later bought, a large farmhouse in the village for his family. He stayed for 43 years, from 1883 until his death in 1926. On the grounds, he created the landscape he would later paint - wide swaths of vibrant flowers of all sizes and heights on the slope from the house toward a tributary of River Epte, which feeds into the Seine.
FOOD
June 4, 2000 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Only a rascal for mischief would build a multimillion-dollar restaurant called Rat's in a far-flung industrial zone outside of Trenton, and expect people to come. Then again, if you're going to be eccentric, it doesn't hurt to be a Johnson - as in Johnson & Johnson - and a world-famous sculptor, for that matter, as is the case with J. Seward Johnson. But what separates this bon vivant artiste from all those other millionaires-turned-highfalutin restaurateurs, of which there seem to be more than a few these days?
FOOD
March 19, 2000 | By Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When they say "life is a work in progress," they probably are thinking about J. Seward Johnson Jr., the noted realist sculptor and millionaire. Once a sculpture is set in bronze, usually, it is finished. But not to Johnson. Johnson fiddles with the work's environment. Eight years ago, he set up Grounds for Sculpture - a lushly landscaped sculpture park housing 130 large pieces of his own and of others - near an industrial park outside Trenton. A fine setting, but not quite enough of a destination, even with free admission.
NEWS
September 20, 1998 | By Donald D. Groff, FOR THE INQUIRER
New Jersey wants to cash in on the Revolutionary War. The state's tourism office has just published "A Revolutionary Time: The Guide to New Jersey's Revolutionary War Trail," a slick 16-page publication that traces landmarks of that turbulent period. The guide suggests six itineraries ranging from "The Retreat Across New Jersey - November 1776" to "Washington's Farewell Address - November 1783. " It also steers visitors to other historic sites and provides a chronology of Revolutionary-era events in the state.
NEWS
December 19, 1995 | by Ed Voves, Special to the Daily News
Dylan Thomas recalls in "A Child's Christmas in Wales" of hearing a cry of "Fire!" one Christmas Eve from the home of neighbors, the Prothero family. After the flames had been extinguished, Miss Prothero, who "said the right thing, always," asked the firemen a bizarre question. "Would you like anything to read?" Miss Prothero's off-the-wall question is not out of place this pre- Christmas week, however, when most of us have so many holiday gifts to buy and so little time left.
NEWS
November 22, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
A painter needs either a load of confidence or a modicum of chutzpah to take on Claude Monet in his own back yard. However she primed herself for her recent six-month residency at Monet's former home in Giverny, France, Diane Burko handled the challenge admirably. Confronting what Monet saw and immortalized in his late work, Burko produced a series of landscapes that reinterpret his vision in her own fresh and distinctive language. She respects the master impressionist, but she doesn't attempt to imitate him; she's a good enough painter not to need that kind of reinforcement.
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