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NEWS
March 12, 1989 | By Bill Bryson, Special to The Inquirer
There is an old Glasgow story about a policeman who arrests a drunk on Sauchiehall Street, one of the city's main thoroughfares, but hauls him around the corner to Hope Street to book him. When asked why, the policeman explains: "Because I can spell Hope Street. " That joke tells you a little about the Glasgow sense of humor, but even more about Glasgow life, since it involves a policeman and a drunk. Most Glasgow stories involve a policeman and a drunk, but then policemen and drunks have long been a highly visible feature of the city's landscape.
NEWS
September 23, 1996 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The solicitor warned that the township could lose the case. Many residents wanted to fight anyway. So the five supervisors have decided to go to court to defend their refusal to let Glasgow Inc. move its asphalt plant closer to a residential area. In April, the board voted, 4-1, to reject Glasgow's request. The company wanted to move its King of Prussia plant to the Swedeland-Swedesburg area. At a meeting Thursday night, the board again contended that moving the plant to Flint Hill and Church Roads would create a noxious hazard that would compromise the health, quality of life, and property values of nearby residents.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Tyrique Glasgow stood on the corner of Taney and Tasker Streets, a few squares of South Philadelphia pavement outside the May Flower Chinese restaurant - a 15-foot stretch of concrete and asphalt that was once his world. A world he had been willing to die for. A world he had been willing to kill for. A world he had gone to war for. From that vantage point, Glasgow scanned the surrounding corners of Grays Ferry and counted off six others like the one where he stood: Six corners in a space not quite the size of a football field, ruled by crews of young men who see little for themselves but the lure of easy money and the threat of early death.
NEWS
October 28, 1996 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Board of Supervisors had heeded the admonitions of scores of area residents when it rejected an application to move an asphalt plant closer to a neighborhood. But after an order by a Montgomery County judge, the board reversed its April decision Thursday by a 4-0 vote. That will allow Glasgow Inc. to move its plant from South Henderson Road near Route 202 to about a mile away, at Flint Hill and Church Roads. The relocation, closer to a rock quarry, will make their operation more efficient, Glasgow representatives have said.
NEWS
October 1, 1996 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The dispute between Upper Merion Township and Glasgow Inc. over a proposal to relocate an asphalt plant closer to a residential area has moved from the township building to the Montgomery County Courthouse. After discussion of the conflict in public meetings before angry residents in recent months, attorneys from both sides pleaded their cases before Judge Albert R. Subers yesterday. Glasgow is hoping the court will overrule the Board of Supervisors, which voted, 4-1, in April to reject Glasgow's application to move the plant about a mile from King of Prussia to the Swedesland-Swedesburg area.
NEWS
April 15, 1996 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Heeding the objections of residents, the Board of Supervisors has voted to reject a proposal to move an asphalt plant of Glasgow Inc. close to a residential area in King of Prussia. The company operates a plant on Henderson Road in King of Prussia and wants to move about a mile away to Flint Hill and Church Roads, where it operates a rock quarry. Combining the plant and the quarry would save money, Glasgow's attorney, Edward Hughes, told the board at a meeting Thursday. Glasgow claimed it has met all requirements, and its officials argued that the proposed site is highly industrial.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Upper Merion's supervisors must approve an application allowing Glasgow Inc. to move an asphalt plant closer to a residential area, a Montgomery County judge ordered Monday. The supervisors had voted, 4-1, in April to reject Glasgow's proposal to relocate the plant about a mile, from King of Prussia to the Swedesburg-Swedesland area. Dozens of residents had said the plant's noise and smell would lower the quality of their lives and property values. Glasgow appealed, and lawyers for both sides appeared before Judge Albert R. Subers last week.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | By Joshua Klein, Special to The Inquirer
Marple Township Commissioner Barry Dozor said he'd take a weekly trip to Harrisburg if he could have meetings such as the one he had Wednesday. Dozor and fellow Commissioners John Longacre 2d and Bill DeSanto went to Harrisburg to meet with Secretary of Transportation Howard Yerusalim, local PennDOT engineer Steven Lester and state Sen. F. Joseph Loeper 2d (R., 26th District) to discuss two of the township's most pressing problems - the development of 100 acres in a residential neighborhood and blasting by contractors building the Blue Route.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
The rain held off. The temperature was warm but comfortable, the music breezy and familiar, as the Mann Center kicked off the second year of the Skyline Stage series Wednesday night, with two of indie rock's most beloved bands, Belle & Sebastian and Yo La Tengo. Glasgow's Belle & Sebastian haven't released an album since 2010's Write About Love . (They have a collection of B-sides and remixes coming next month.) This lack of new material meant they would "traipse through the Belle & Sebastian back-catalogue," as leader Stuart Murdoch said.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
SCARLETT JOHANSSON, heard but not seen in 'Her," is mostly unheard but thoroughly seen in "Under the Skin. " She plays an alien in human form, prowling Glasgow, Scotland, for men, luring them back to her lair, where they wade into an inky black pool, a kind of eerie fish tank/womb where the imprisoned men float helplessly, looking at each other with faces of confused horror. Advance buzz has focused on the fact that alien predator Johansson does a few nude scenes, and that makes "Under the Skin" sound like B-movie sci-fi (remember "Species?
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NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Tyrique Glasgow stood on the corner of Taney and Tasker Streets, a few squares of South Philadelphia pavement outside the May Flower Chinese restaurant - a 15-foot stretch of concrete and asphalt that was once his world. A world he had been willing to die for. A world he had been willing to kill for. A world he had gone to war for. From that vantage point, Glasgow scanned the surrounding corners of Grays Ferry and counted off six others like the one where he stood: Six corners in a space not quite the size of a football field, ruled by crews of young men who see little for themselves but the lure of easy money and the threat of early death.
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
SCARLETT JOHANSSON, heard but not seen in 'Her," is mostly unheard but thoroughly seen in "Under the Skin. " She plays an alien in human form, prowling Glasgow, Scotland, for men, luring them back to her lair, where they wade into an inky black pool, a kind of eerie fish tank/womb where the imprisoned men float helplessly, looking at each other with faces of confused horror. Advance buzz has focused on the fact that alien predator Johansson does a few nude scenes, and that makes "Under the Skin" sound like B-movie sci-fi (remember "Species?
NEWS
July 14, 2013 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
THIS RAIN has totally harshed our summer buzz. It delayed two Phillies games in the same week and postponed last night's. It made hog slop of the U.S. Open. It washed out the annual Baltimore Avenue Dollar Stroll in University City, leaving diners and revelers high and dry. And so many mosquitoes have started families in my puddled back yard, I get bitten everywhere but my gums when I let the dog out. How do folks in ever-wet climates put up with this crap? "We just get on with it," said "Mr. Paul, no last names, please," who answered the phone at the Palm Tree, a London watering hole described as a "proper East End boozer" on the Guardian 's top-10 list of city pubs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
The rain held off. The temperature was warm but comfortable, the music breezy and familiar, as the Mann Center kicked off the second year of the Skyline Stage series Wednesday night, with two of indie rock's most beloved bands, Belle & Sebastian and Yo La Tengo. Glasgow's Belle & Sebastian haven't released an album since 2010's Write About Love . (They have a collection of B-sides and remixes coming next month.) This lack of new material meant they would "traipse through the Belle & Sebastian back-catalogue," as leader Stuart Murdoch said.
SPORTS
August 11, 2012 | By Joseph D'Hippolito, For The Inquirer
Even after more than a century of achievement, one fact succinctly summarizes Real Madrid's status in soccer. Ten of its players, the most from any club, competed for three nations in last month's semifinals of the European championships. Five of them helped Spain defend its title. Those players - including Portugal's Cristiano Ronaldo, Spain's Iker Casillas, and Germany's Mesut Ozil - will face Scottish champion Glasgow Celtic at Lincoln Financial Field on Saturday night. The exhibition is the end of a four-game tour of the United States.
SPORTS
July 30, 2012 | By Carli Lloyd, For The Inquirer
Delran native and Rutgers graduate Carli Lloyd has scored twice in the U.S. women's soccer team's first two games - both victories that already advanced the Americans into the quarterfinal round. Here are her thoughts on the first days in London. As it stands right now we are headed to the quarterfinals but we still have some business to finish. We need to beat North Korea so we can be placed first in our group. I have been having the time of my life playing these past two games.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2012 | Howard Gensler
Iron Man may soon be covered in lead paint. Walt Disney, the company not the ghost, said Monday that it will co-produce its next "Iron Man" movie with a Chinese partner in Hollywood's latest effort to forge closer ties with China's fast-growing film industry and billion potential filmgoers. "Iron Man 3," starring Robert Downey Jr., Gwyneth Paltrow and Don Cheadle, will begin filming this year, Disney and DMG Entertainment said. Disney said DMG will jointly produce the movie in China but gave no indication what parts might be filmed in this country.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2011 | By Dan Gross
EVEN SCOTTISH zombies read the Daily News . A People's Paper newspaper box is one of the Philadelphia props in "World War Z," the Brad Pitt zombie thriller that is now filming in Glasgow, Scotland. "World War Z" is based on a book set in Philadelphia that centers on a zombie apocalypse. The movie was considering shooting here, which also helped fuel the rumor that Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie are buying a house in, and/or moving to, Blue Bell that we told you about in June.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Don't expect staggering, flesh-eating, virus-revived corpses to add millions of dollars to Philadelphia's economy this summer. Blame uncertainties about state tax credits for filmmakers, says the head of the Greater Philadelphia Film Office. World War Z , about the aftermath of a zombie Armageddon, is set in Philadelphia, but star Brad Pitt will be shooting his action scenes in Glasgow, Scotland, in August. This week, crews reportedly began preliminary work there, prepping for fake storefronts and planning for importing U.S. cars.
NEWS
December 16, 2007 | By Elliott Hester FOR THE INQUIRER
Because the city is home to numerous bands and live-concert venues, Time magazine called it "Europe's secret capital of music. " It boasts hip new restaurants, a thriving arts scene, stunning Victorian architecture, and enough rollicking pubs and clubs to satisfy party-hungry appetites. Oh, yeah, and the men like to dress up in skirts. Kilt-wearing blokes notwithstanding, Glasgow is a must-see destination. A onetime haven for shipbuilders and textile workers, this town of 600,000 has blossomed into a stylish city that even a hipster could love.
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