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NEWS
December 6, 2005
I CAN'T BELIEVE that idiotic couple were having sex against the window in a high-rise building not worrying about caving through the window and falling to their deaths. Don't they have anything better to do than possibly spreading STDs, HIV and AIDS, which have killed a lot of young people as well as older people? Talk about college education. Robert F. Schaffer Philadelphia
FOOD
May 22, 1991 | by Deborah Licklider, Daily News Staff Writer
The first time I ate at Villa di Roma, that 9th Street institution, I assumed that my "house red" was served in a water tumbler because all the wine glasses were dirty. A few glasses later I realized a water tumbler was a wine glass at the venerable Villa. But by that time, I didn't care. I just knew the wine tasted good with my mussels in red sauce. I've never been too picky about my choice of chalice. One of my most memorable imbibings was a late spring Saturday, sitting in an Upstate New York woods, sipping May a wine fragrant with woodruff and eating fresh strawberries.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Forty years ago, friends gave John Whitenight a Christmas present like no other: a Victorian glass dome with three stuffed canaries inside. He recalls the moment this way: "Boom! It was a dome explosion. " In the decades since, this retired high school art teacher has amassed about 200 of these oddly fascinating pieces, which contain artful, antique displays of flora, fauna, and food made of wax, paper, human hair, wool and muslin, feathers, seashells, and buttons. There are real animals in there, too - not just canaries, but wide-eyed monkeys and goats, huge pheasants and tiny pugs and terriers, forever preserved by the skilled taxidermists that enchanted those nutty Victorians.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
A proposal to establish curbside pickup of glass for recycling has been presented to the Sharon Hill Borough Council. During a council caucus meeting Thursday night, Councilman Ralph S. Brower recommended that the borough consider purchasing a truck to collect glass at residents' homes rather than have residents bring the glass to receptacles at the borough hall. Brower said the borough would receive additional revenue if it picked up the glass and transported it to a glass company, or had the company pick it up at the borough hall.
NEWS
January 22, 1995 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Three businesses here, and in one in Buckingham, were burglarized Tuesday by someone who likes to remove glass from windows or doors. Police also are investigating two other commercial burglaries that occurred here three days before as possibly related. A window pane had been removed in one of those incidents. At least $2,200 in cash was taken in the four most recent incidents, along with some other valuables. Some cash and a commercial license were taken in one of the other burglaries.
NEWS
August 29, 1986 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer (Mary Ann Norbom contributed to this article.)
Latest project for Channel 3's indefatigable Nancy "Who Needs Sleep?" Glass is Avenues, a woman-oriented show on cable's Lifetime network. It will debut Oct. 6 and air weekdays at 1 and 6 p.m. and Saturdays at 11 a.m. Glass will host the hour-long show with Linda Dano, the flamboyant Felicia Gallant on NBC's Another World. Avenues is the brainchild of Lifetime programming chief Chuck Gingold, Glass' former boss, and mentor, at Channel 3. Twice a week, after finishing her duties with KYW-TV's Evening Magazine, Glass will spend eight hours in New York taping two segments.
FOOD
May 22, 1991 | Peter Kohama/Daily News
Wine glasses facilitate the ritual of wine tasting: judging the color, swirling, smelling and sipping. The ideal glass is clear and thin, making it easy to control the flow of wine into the mouth. RED WINE Red-wine glasses are larger than white and usually curved slightly inward at the top so the bouquet can collect above the surface of the wine. Fill the glass only half-full so there's room for the bouquet (and so your nose won't get wet when you sniff it.) WHITE WINE White-wine glasses are smaller than red, though an all-purpose glass with an 8- or 10-ounce capacity may be used for both.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | By Terence Samuel and Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Even in the darkness, you could hear and feel the glass cascading all around. "There was just this shower of glass," said Jane Mitchell, a library employee at Haverford College, who was on her way to the 69th Street Terminal. "I just felt this very strong swerve, and then glass. " Kimberly Worthen of Logan, also on her way to 69th Street, was in the second car, she said, when she felt the train go off the tracks, and then she saw sparks. "People were screaming," Worthen said.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2002 | By Claire Furia Smith FOR THE INQUIRER
The tattered index cards that Alex Kinnier and Russ Walters have been carrying in their wallets since the night before their graduation from Lehigh University in 1998 are still intact. And so are the rules, goals and time line that the two chemical-engineering majors, now 27, jotted on the cards that night in hope that those thoughts would help them stay focused on their dream of launching a business together one day. The index cards "kept us aligned," Kinnier said. "We took them out every time we talked.
NEWS
July 27, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
A memorial service will be held Saturday for Joseph Diano, an artist in stained glass, who died Thursday. He was 83 and lived in Southampton, Bucks County. "He never thought about retiring," his daughter, Patricia Tougas, said yesterday. Tougas said her father still went regularly to the Willet Stained Glass Studio in Chestnut Hill, where he had worked nearly 45 years, until the Christmas before he underwent open-heart surgery two years ago. Diano, an Italian immigrant, came to this country with his mother in the early 1900s to join his father, a stonemason, and grew up in South Philadelphia, around 6th and South streets.
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NEWS
September 17, 2016
ISSUE | GENDER EQUALITY One-sided training How can a commentary ("Don't just celebrate the 'firsts' ," Wednesday) seriously suggest that the best way to prepare young ladies for the challenge of breaking glass ceilings is to coddle them in the cocoon of an all-girls school? During their formative years, girls in such schools learn little, if anything, about how to work with, team with, or compete with boys. Consequently, when they leave the cocoon, the young ladies are, by definition, among the least well-prepared for the real-world task of breaking through glass ceilings.
NEWS
August 29, 2016 | By Craig LaBan, Restaurant Critic
A long time ago, I went to work at a restaurant in Chambéry, France, and along the way discovered an entire class of refreshing alpine wines I'd never heard of before.   Chignin? Roussette? These regional curiosities were hardly ever seen then, even in cosmopolitan Paris. But 25 years later, on the more adventurous lists of Philadelphia's suddenly burgeoning wine scene, the mountain wines of the French Savoi e have become one sign of a sommelier who encourages guests to explore.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
When the next "War of the Worlds" disaster sends us all careening out of town, I know where I'm going to hide out: Bensalem. More precisely, heading north on I-95 to a WWII-era industrial park on State Road and an unexpected new tech showroom that goes by the clunky name ISPBC (International Self Powered-Business Council) PHL Showcase. Although glass-walled and -roofed, this is a house you can throw stones at. It's built largely of multilayered, "hurricane resistant" photovoltaic windows, a super solar glass that takes a beating and soaks up enough energy to make the 1,100 square-foot building self-powered.
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Is there any architectural category more reviled than the concrete high-rises built in the 1960s as subsidized housing? Philadelphia, like many American cities, has been systematically obliterating its public-housing towers, which were known as much for their harsh designs as for poverty and crime. And yet one dramatic exception has managed to age with grace amid the leafy, redbrick streets of Washington Square West. Casa Farnese, the gleaming white International Style tower at 13th and Lombard, is the work of Oscar Stonorov, an important Philadelphia modernist who collaborated with the likes of George Howe and Louis Kahn, and was a devoted follower of Le Corbusier.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2016 | By Kevin Brasler, DELAWARE VALLEY CONSUMERS' CHECKBOOK
Before shelling out big bucks for an alarm system, take basic measures to improve your home's security. Many effective strategies cost very little or nothing. Most burglars enter homes by opening unlocked doors or windows, or by pushing, kicking, or prying locked ones until they open. Some break glass to reach in and unlock windows or doors. Only a few will break enough glass to walk or crawl through, or bash in a well-secured door, and they seldom pick locks. So start by making doors and windows as difficult to penetrate as possible.
NEWS
May 14, 2016
In 1906, Leonor Loree, an accomplished railroad executive, examined the dilapidated Kansas City Southern Railroad that he had been hired to rehabilitate. Dismayed, he permanently enriched American slang by exclaiming: "This is a helluva way to run a railroad!" Judge Janice Rogers Brown of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, the nation's second-most important court, recently said, with judicial decorousness, essentially the same thing about Amtrak. She was not referring to its 46 consecutive years of operating losses, which include $306 million last year and more than $16 billion since 1970, when Congress created Amtrak as a federally chartered, for-profit corporation.
REAL_ESTATE
February 8, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
Question: Our house has lots of older windows that shake when the wind blows. The windows have ropes and pulleys. The glass also is coming out of the window frames in a lot of cases. We have an older house and do not want to replace the windows with modern stuff, because it never looks very good, and historic- looking replacements cost so much money and there are a lot of windows in our house. We are just looking for a professional who might repair the mechanisms and replace the glass.
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Edwin J. Berkowitz, 89, of Merion, a businessman and philanthropist whose generosity benefited students and Jewish causes, died of cancer Friday, Jan. 8, under hospice care at his condominium in Longboat Key, Fla. Mr. Berkowitz was known as a philanthropic leader in the Philadelphia area and abroad, especially in Israel. In 1998, he and his wife formed the Edwin J. and Barbara R. Berkowitz Family Foundation, and ran it with their children from the family's home. The foundation gives to Jewish organizations and to further the cause of education.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The history of 20th-century architecture abounds with buildings that critics love and users hate, but there aren't many that have suffered such extreme public mood swings as the Richards Medical Research Laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania. Designed by the acclaimed Philadelphia architect Louis Kahn , the clutch of brick towers was celebrated in a solo show at New York's MoMA in 1961, a year before it opened. The museum deemed Richards "the most consequential building constructed in the United States" since World War II. The dirty secret is that Penn's scientists hated Richards from the day they moved in. They complained there was no privacy in the large, open-plan labs, and no respite from the natural light that flooded in from Kahn's generous windows.
NEWS
January 8, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My husband, an avid soccer player, injured himself twice last year, which left him unable to work for months at a time. He refuses to hang up his cleats because he says it's his "one true passion. " I think he's being selfish because his soccer injuries have caused a financial, emotional and physical strain on our family. I can't be the only wife and mom who doesn't want the additional risk. Any advice on how to get through to him? - Sports Wife in Cleveland DEAR SPORTS WIFE: I don't know how old your husband is, but two serious injuries in one year may be a hint from Father Time that his reflexes aren't as acute as they once were, and he should channel his passion in another direction.
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