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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The Cheesecake Factory's design sensibility, like its menu, is founded on the belief that too much is never enough. In contrast, the architects at Bohlin Cywinski Jackson operate on the presumption that you're usually better off with less. That thinking has informed their coolly minimalist designs for the Apple stores, most notably their wispy glass cube in Manhattan. But development often makes for strange bedfellows, and so BCJ was hired by Midwood Investment to design a new Walnut Street building that could contain the restaurant's particular brand of excess.
NEWS
December 6, 2005
I CAN'T BELIEVE that idiotic couple were having sex against the window in a high-rise building not worrying about caving through the window and falling to their deaths. Don't they have anything better to do than possibly spreading STDs, HIV and AIDS, which have killed a lot of young people as well as older people? Talk about college education. Robert F. Schaffer Philadelphia
FOOD
May 22, 1991 | by Deborah Licklider, Daily News Staff Writer
The first time I ate at Villa di Roma, that 9th Street institution, I assumed that my "house red" was served in a water tumbler because all the wine glasses were dirty. A few glasses later I realized a water tumbler was a wine glass at the venerable Villa. But by that time, I didn't care. I just knew the wine tasted good with my mussels in red sauce. I've never been too picky about my choice of chalice. One of my most memorable imbibings was a late spring Saturday, sitting in an Upstate New York woods, sipping May a wine fragrant with woodruff and eating fresh strawberries.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Forty years ago, friends gave John Whitenight a Christmas present like no other: a Victorian glass dome with three stuffed canaries inside. He recalls the moment this way: "Boom! It was a dome explosion. " In the decades since, this retired high school art teacher has amassed about 200 of these oddly fascinating pieces, which contain artful, antique displays of flora, fauna, and food made of wax, paper, human hair, wool and muslin, feathers, seashells, and buttons. There are real animals in there, too - not just canaries, but wide-eyed monkeys and goats, huge pheasants and tiny pugs and terriers, forever preserved by the skilled taxidermists that enchanted those nutty Victorians.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
A proposal to establish curbside pickup of glass for recycling has been presented to the Sharon Hill Borough Council. During a council caucus meeting Thursday night, Councilman Ralph S. Brower recommended that the borough consider purchasing a truck to collect glass at residents' homes rather than have residents bring the glass to receptacles at the borough hall. Brower said the borough would receive additional revenue if it picked up the glass and transported it to a glass company, or had the company pick it up at the borough hall.
NEWS
January 22, 1995 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Three businesses here, and in one in Buckingham, were burglarized Tuesday by someone who likes to remove glass from windows or doors. Police also are investigating two other commercial burglaries that occurred here three days before as possibly related. A window pane had been removed in one of those incidents. At least $2,200 in cash was taken in the four most recent incidents, along with some other valuables. Some cash and a commercial license were taken in one of the other burglaries.
NEWS
August 29, 1986 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer (Mary Ann Norbom contributed to this article.)
Latest project for Channel 3's indefatigable Nancy "Who Needs Sleep?" Glass is Avenues, a woman-oriented show on cable's Lifetime network. It will debut Oct. 6 and air weekdays at 1 and 6 p.m. and Saturdays at 11 a.m. Glass will host the hour-long show with Linda Dano, the flamboyant Felicia Gallant on NBC's Another World. Avenues is the brainchild of Lifetime programming chief Chuck Gingold, Glass' former boss, and mentor, at Channel 3. Twice a week, after finishing her duties with KYW-TV's Evening Magazine, Glass will spend eight hours in New York taping two segments.
REAL_ESTATE
July 13, 2015 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Dave Franke and Susan Dardes are outspoken in their enthusiasm for their 1,800-square-foot, glass-and-wood house hidden away on two acres near Doylestown. Franke, an architect who is now a principal with Studio Agoos Lovera, drives 50 miles round trip to his Philadelphia office each day. Despite the commute, his home is "a paradise," he says. After successfully locating the house, which might elude even the best GPS-equipped navigator, a visitor's first view is of a colorful green, red, and white enameled-steel panel attached to a garage at the end of a long driveway.
FOOD
May 22, 1991 | Peter Kohama/Daily News
Wine glasses facilitate the ritual of wine tasting: judging the color, swirling, smelling and sipping. The ideal glass is clear and thin, making it easy to control the flow of wine into the mouth. RED WINE Red-wine glasses are larger than white and usually curved slightly inward at the top so the bouquet can collect above the surface of the wine. Fill the glass only half-full so there's room for the bouquet (and so your nose won't get wet when you sniff it.) WHITE WINE White-wine glasses are smaller than red, though an all-purpose glass with an 8- or 10-ounce capacity may be used for both.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | By Terence Samuel and Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Even in the darkness, you could hear and feel the glass cascading all around. "There was just this shower of glass," said Jane Mitchell, a library employee at Haverford College, who was on her way to the 69th Street Terminal. "I just felt this very strong swerve, and then glass. " Kimberly Worthen of Logan, also on her way to 69th Street, was in the second car, she said, when she felt the train go off the tracks, and then she saw sparks. "People were screaming," Worthen said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The Cheesecake Factory's design sensibility, like its menu, is founded on the belief that too much is never enough. In contrast, the architects at Bohlin Cywinski Jackson operate on the presumption that you're usually better off with less. That thinking has informed their coolly minimalist designs for the Apple stores, most notably their wispy glass cube in Manhattan. But development often makes for strange bedfellows, and so BCJ was hired by Midwood Investment to design a new Walnut Street building that could contain the restaurant's particular brand of excess.
REAL_ESTATE
July 13, 2015 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Dave Franke and Susan Dardes are outspoken in their enthusiasm for their 1,800-square-foot, glass-and-wood house hidden away on two acres near Doylestown. Franke, an architect who is now a principal with Studio Agoos Lovera, drives 50 miles round trip to his Philadelphia office each day. Despite the commute, his home is "a paradise," he says. After successfully locating the house, which might elude even the best GPS-equipped navigator, a visitor's first view is of a colorful green, red, and white enameled-steel panel attached to a garage at the end of a long driveway.
NEWS
July 7, 2015 | BY BOB STEWART, Daily News Staff Writer
A BOUQUET OF balloons hung above an empty table in a Northeast Philadelphia union hall full of construction workers. A sign reserved the table for "Friends of Fonzie. " The workers, known to occasionally get into heated arguments, were conducting the routine business of reading expense reports and voting on issues with "ayes" or "nays. " Suddenly they grew silent and just smiled: Alfonso "Fonzie" Soglia, 4, and his parents had arrived. The Glaziers Union Local 252 had invited the boy as guest of honor at this monthly closed-door gathering June 17 at Southampton and Townsend roads.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nancy Glass slid open a door at her TV production company in Bala Cynwyd to a soothingly darkened room. There, video editor Travis Greene was tweaking the first episode of a Discovery ID special based on the book Let's Kill Mom . In another room on the same floor, three staff members were editing video shot earlier this year in Cuba for an episode of the Travel Channel coffee series Dangerous Grounds . "We do great incredible television in...
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | Inga Saffron, Inquirer
Warm weather and tourists have arrived in Philadelphia, and that means the season of the big, corporate-sponsored event is upon us. Saturday, it was the much ballyhooed "Future Sensations," which has set up camp amid the towering London Plane trees in Eakins Oval and will offer a week of free sound-and-light shows in a cluster of architecturally varied pavilions. Billed in the media kit as "a never-before-seen experiential journey of science, storytelling and art," the event might be more accurately described as a massive promotional plug for Saint-Gobain, a French company that manufactures building materials, and has its North American headquarters in Valley Forge.
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Columnist
  The creatures came to take souls. They were hovering very close, in a virtual reality demo - formally called "Into the Further 4D Virtual Reality Experience" - that opened for scary business over the weekend on Second Street near South. Piggybacking on the South Street Spring Festival, this traveling virtual fun house presentation was sponsored by a major movie studio (Focus Features) and provided a sophisticated/sneaky way to get you interested in its freaky June 5 release, Insidious Chapter 3 . The movie theme is pretty typical - teenage girl is threatened with ghostly creatures craving to feed on her pure, innocent essence.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
NOT SURE how the big news networks missed this on 4/20, but hip-hop performer Waka Flocka Flame has announced he's running for president. The only thing holding him back? He's 28. Not old enough. This is why you need to pay attention in poli-sci class, kids, to avoid the humiliation of announcing a presidential run before you're eligible. Flame, however, shot a video for Rolling Stone magazine in which he announced his candidacy. "I'm very pleased to announce today, on 4/20, the best day of the year, I will be running for president," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2015 | By Matthew Westphal, For The Inquirer
It was five for ten at the Curtis Institute on Sunday afternoon: Dolce Suono, the flexible chamber ensemble founded at the school 10 years ago by enterprising flutist Mimi Stillman, celebrated the anniversary with music by five generations of composers who studied or taught there - from Samuel Barber through two young grads commissioned by Stillman for the occasion. Star faculty member Jennifer Higdon was represented by   "Autumn Reflection   ," a brief flute/piano work from her student days that provides exactly what the title promises, and "Lullaby " with bass-baritone Thomas Shivone being far too operatic with overly robust tone and indistinct pitch.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Philip Glass has been such a constant compositional presence over the last 40 years that only with the arrival of his memoir, Words Without Music (W.W. Norton & Co. $29.95), do you realize how long overdue it is. The book chronicles his Baltimore upbringing, education in Paris, and travels in Europe and India. But it rightly touches on only the major works of his early and middle periods, gracefully leaving the reader to conclude how much the 78-year-old Glassv - who will appear at the Free Library on Tuesday evening - has changed the cutting-edge music world, how that world is run, how pieces are made and disseminated, and the value of his having saved serious music from the hegemony of modernism.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
It hit her during Mass, on one of those days when the priest's homily drags on a little too long. Student Laura Bunyard turned her gaze away from the lectern in the chapel at Rosemont College to the figures in the stained-glass windows. St. Barbara, St. Cecilia, St. Ursula, St. Gertrude, St. Joan of Arc, St. Veronica, St. Rose of Lima. Only then did Bunyard realize that almost all the people depicted in the warm colors of red, blue, and gold were women - saints who burned at a stake, wiped the face of their savior, or languished in jail for refusing to relinquish their virtue.
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