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NEWS
December 6, 2005
I CAN'T BELIEVE that idiotic couple were having sex against the window in a high-rise building not worrying about caving through the window and falling to their deaths. Don't they have anything better to do than possibly spreading STDs, HIV and AIDS, which have killed a lot of young people as well as older people? Talk about college education. Robert F. Schaffer Philadelphia
FOOD
May 22, 1991 | by Deborah Licklider, Daily News Staff Writer
The first time I ate at Villa di Roma, that 9th Street institution, I assumed that my "house red" was served in a water tumbler because all the wine glasses were dirty. A few glasses later I realized a water tumbler was a wine glass at the venerable Villa. But by that time, I didn't care. I just knew the wine tasted good with my mussels in red sauce. I've never been too picky about my choice of chalice. One of my most memorable imbibings was a late spring Saturday, sitting in an Upstate New York woods, sipping May a wine fragrant with woodruff and eating fresh strawberries.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
A proposal to establish curbside pickup of glass for recycling has been presented to the Sharon Hill Borough Council. During a council caucus meeting Thursday night, Councilman Ralph S. Brower recommended that the borough consider purchasing a truck to collect glass at residents' homes rather than have residents bring the glass to receptacles at the borough hall. Brower said the borough would receive additional revenue if it picked up the glass and transported it to a glass company, or had the company pick it up at the borough hall.
NEWS
January 22, 1995 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Three businesses here, and in one in Buckingham, were burglarized Tuesday by someone who likes to remove glass from windows or doors. Police also are investigating two other commercial burglaries that occurred here three days before as possibly related. A window pane had been removed in one of those incidents. At least $2,200 in cash was taken in the four most recent incidents, along with some other valuables. Some cash and a commercial license were taken in one of the other burglaries.
NEWS
August 29, 1986 | By Gail Shister, Inquirer Staff Writer (Mary Ann Norbom contributed to this article.)
Latest project for Channel 3's indefatigable Nancy "Who Needs Sleep?" Glass is Avenues, a woman-oriented show on cable's Lifetime network. It will debut Oct. 6 and air weekdays at 1 and 6 p.m. and Saturdays at 11 a.m. Glass will host the hour-long show with Linda Dano, the flamboyant Felicia Gallant on NBC's Another World. Avenues is the brainchild of Lifetime programming chief Chuck Gingold, Glass' former boss, and mentor, at Channel 3. Twice a week, after finishing her duties with KYW-TV's Evening Magazine, Glass will spend eight hours in New York taping two segments.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2013 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Forty years ago, friends gave John Whitenight a Christmas present like no other: a Victorian glass dome with three stuffed canaries inside. He recalls the moment this way: "Boom! It was a dome explosion. " In the decades since, this retired high school art teacher has amassed about 200 of these oddly fascinating pieces, which contain artful, antique displays of flora, fauna, and food made of wax, paper, human hair, wool and muslin, feathers, seashells, and buttons. There are real animals in there, too - not just canaries, but wide-eyed monkeys and goats, huge pheasants and tiny pugs and terriers, forever preserved by the skilled taxidermists that enchanted those nutty Victorians.
FOOD
May 22, 1991 | Peter Kohama/Daily News
Wine glasses facilitate the ritual of wine tasting: judging the color, swirling, smelling and sipping. The ideal glass is clear and thin, making it easy to control the flow of wine into the mouth. RED WINE Red-wine glasses are larger than white and usually curved slightly inward at the top so the bouquet can collect above the surface of the wine. Fill the glass only half-full so there's room for the bouquet (and so your nose won't get wet when you sniff it.) WHITE WINE White-wine glasses are smaller than red, though an all-purpose glass with an 8- or 10-ounce capacity may be used for both.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | By Terence Samuel and Murray Dubin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Even in the darkness, you could hear and feel the glass cascading all around. "There was just this shower of glass," said Jane Mitchell, a library employee at Haverford College, who was on her way to the 69th Street Terminal. "I just felt this very strong swerve, and then glass. " Kimberly Worthen of Logan, also on her way to 69th Street, was in the second car, she said, when she felt the train go off the tracks, and then she saw sparks. "People were screaming," Worthen said.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2002 | By Claire Furia Smith FOR THE INQUIRER
The tattered index cards that Alex Kinnier and Russ Walters have been carrying in their wallets since the night before their graduation from Lehigh University in 1998 are still intact. And so are the rules, goals and time line that the two chemical-engineering majors, now 27, jotted on the cards that night in hope that those thoughts would help them stay focused on their dream of launching a business together one day. The index cards "kept us aligned," Kinnier said. "We took them out every time we talked.
NEWS
July 27, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
A memorial service will be held Saturday for Joseph Diano, an artist in stained glass, who died Thursday. He was 83 and lived in Southampton, Bucks County. "He never thought about retiring," his daughter, Patricia Tougas, said yesterday. Tougas said her father still went regularly to the Willet Stained Glass Studio in Chestnut Hill, where he had worked nearly 45 years, until the Christmas before he underwent open-heart surgery two years ago. Diano, an Italian immigrant, came to this country with his mother in the early 1900s to join his father, a stonemason, and grew up in South Philadelphia, around 6th and South streets.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 5, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Columnist
  The creatures came to take souls. They were hovering very close, in a virtual reality demo - formally called "Into the Further 4D Virtual Reality Experience" - that opened for scary business over the weekend on Second Street near South. Piggybacking on the South Street Spring Festival, this traveling virtual fun house presentation was sponsored by a major movie studio (Focus Features) and provided a sophisticated/sneaky way to get you interested in its freaky June 5 release, Insidious Chapter 3 . The movie theme is pretty typical - teenage girl is threatened with ghostly creatures craving to feed on her pure, innocent essence.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
NOT SURE how the big news networks missed this on 4/20, but hip-hop performer Waka Flocka Flame has announced he's running for president. The only thing holding him back? He's 28. Not old enough. This is why you need to pay attention in poli-sci class, kids, to avoid the humiliation of announcing a presidential run before you're eligible. Flame, however, shot a video for Rolling Stone magazine in which he announced his candidacy. "I'm very pleased to announce today, on 4/20, the best day of the year, I will be running for president," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2015 | By Matthew Westphal, For The Inquirer
It was five for ten at the Curtis Institute on Sunday afternoon: Dolce Suono, the flexible chamber ensemble founded at the school 10 years ago by enterprising flutist Mimi Stillman, celebrated the anniversary with music by five generations of composers who studied or taught there - from Samuel Barber through two young grads commissioned by Stillman for the occasion. Star faculty member Jennifer Higdon was represented by   "Autumn Reflection   ," a brief flute/piano work from her student days that provides exactly what the title promises, and "Lullaby " with bass-baritone Thomas Shivone being far too operatic with overly robust tone and indistinct pitch.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2015 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Philip Glass has been such a constant compositional presence over the last 40 years that only with the arrival of his memoir, Words Without Music (W.W. Norton & Co. $29.95), do you realize how long overdue it is. The book chronicles his Baltimore upbringing, education in Paris, and travels in Europe and India. But it rightly touches on only the major works of his early and middle periods, gracefully leaving the reader to conclude how much the 78-year-old Glassv - who will appear at the Free Library on Tuesday evening - has changed the cutting-edge music world, how that world is run, how pieces are made and disseminated, and the value of his having saved serious music from the hegemony of modernism.
NEWS
February 4, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
It hit her during Mass, on one of those days when the priest's homily drags on a little too long. Student Laura Bunyard turned her gaze away from the lectern in the chapel at Rosemont College to the figures in the stained-glass windows. St. Barbara, St. Cecilia, St. Ursula, St. Gertrude, St. Joan of Arc, St. Veronica, St. Rose of Lima. Only then did Bunyard realize that almost all the people depicted in the warm colors of red, blue, and gold were women - saints who burned at a stake, wiped the face of their savior, or languished in jail for refusing to relinquish their virtue.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
They might not like Yuengling. But the Teamsters evidently are drunk in love with Gov.-elect Tom Wolf. A day after State Rep. Mike Vereb (R., Montgomery) said that Wolf's inauguration planners were excluding Yuengling, the Pottsville-based brew, from his inaugural celebration, the leader of Teamsters Local 830 sent out a news release praising the incoming governor - and teeing off on the brewery's president, Richard Yuengling Jr., whom the union has long described as "anti-worker.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2014 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Last week, Carla Belver won the Lifetime Achievement prize at Philadelphia's Barrymore Awards for Excellence in Theater. Meanwhile, at Act II Playhouse, she has unlocked another achievement: As Amanda Wingfield, the floundering matriarch of Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie , she's filled with "vivacity and charm," those man-catching qualities she hopes to instill in Laura, her shrinking violet of a daughter. Alongside this fantastic cast, Belver and director James J. Christy reclaim Amanda's humanity from those productions that would seek to portray her as a scheming harridan.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
To be nerdy is to be hip. And throwing it back is keeping it fresh - hence the eyeglass frame of the season. The trendlet Cat's-eye frames are key to well-dressed women's, and men's, mod arsenal this fall. This is true even if you don't need glasses. Where's it come from? Spectacles were only for seeing until the 1950s, which was when Marilyn Monroe liberated the frames from dowdiness. Audrey Hepburn wore a pair of cat's-eye sunshades, also called Manhattans, in Breakfast at Tiffany's , and Princess Grace was a fan of the almond-shaped eyewear, too. About three years ago, fashion began its earnest celebration of the 1960s, so cat's-eye glasses, and eyeliner, began a major fashion comeback.
NEWS
October 17, 2014
WHEN LAST WE heard from Hohenadel Brewery, the 19th-century East Falls landmark was wincing under the weight of a wrecking ball. It was 1997. Just one look at the stubborn but crumbling brick structure at Conrad Street and Indian Queen Lane told you it was time to pull the plug. The brewery that once proclaimed its "Well Earned Supremacy" could only sigh as it joined the likes of Gretz and Esslinger and Erlanger in the great Philadelphia pile of brewery dust. Indian Queen Ale . . . Rival Porter . . . Trilby Export - the brands that Hohenadel brewed till it closed in 1952 were gone and mostly forgotten.
REAL_ESTATE
October 12, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
I know I'll be getting this question at least once as cooler weather sets in, so here's an explanation of window condensation, courtesy of Tom Herron of the National Fenestration Rating Council. Condensation appears as a light coating of water, frost or ice. Unless the condensation is between the window panes, humidity inside the home is the cause, Herron said. "Humid air holds water vapor until it contacts a surface whose temperature is less than or equal to the dew point," he said.
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