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Glass Art

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
When Janai Dallas was younger, she spent Sunday mornings staring at the stained glass windows of New Covenant Church in Germantown. Babies. Angels. Jesus. She never thought about who made the windows or how they stuck those little panes of glass together. The images were just a colorful distraction from a boring sermon. That was before Dallas, 19, began spending Wednesday afternoons in the basement of a different church, learning to select, score, cut, grind, and solder glass into her own stained glass panels.
NEWS
August 12, 2007 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Matthew Olian is following in the footsteps of masters. He has traveled the globe to study with renowned glass artists to learn techniques that he incorporates into his own style. In his Cherry Hill studio, Olian, 23, prefers to use an open flame to make glass in all colors for earrings, pendants, letter openers, Venetian goblets and more. "It's challenging but rewarding," Olian said as he turned a long glass rod into a pendant in his studio. "I like using the torch because I don't need a team of people to work with me. " Pendants are among Olian's signature pieces.
NEWS
October 25, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER CULTURE WRITER
Philadelphia philanthropists and art collectors Irvin J. Borowsky and Laurie Wagman have given more than $1 million to the Tyler School of Art's glass program, one of the largest gifts to a college glass program anywhere, Tyler officials said Wednesday. The bulk of the funds will be used to increase the capacity of Tyler's glass facility, located at the school on the Temple University North Philadelphia campus, and to bolster and promote its programs. The facility will be named the Irvin Borowsky Glass Studio, Temple officials said.
NEWS
March 26, 1987 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
The molten glass glows orange in Purgatory. It seems to simmer with hope, as if awaiting form and shape and spirit. Glass artist Jon Clark dips a 54-inch-long stainless steel blowpipe into Purgatory - the name his students have bestowed on the largest of the three furnaces in the concrete block "hot shop" at Temple University's Tyler School of Art at Beech and Penrose Avenues in Elkins Park. "I put my blowpipe in there," he says, "and suddenly something is alive on the end of it. " He extracts a glob of molten glass and, continually revolving the rod to keep the glass from falling off, moves quickly to his workbench.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2012
Antiques/Art/Crafts 12th Annual Christmas Craft Fair and Bazaar More than 90 crafters selling handmade items, a wide range of cafe selections for breakfast & lunch, children's games, white elephant. Mother of Divine Providence School, 405 Allendale Rd., King of Prussia. 11/17. 9 am-3 pm. 2d Annual Craft Fair Handmade crafts displayed throughout the library & in the Struble Room. Chester County Library, 450 Exton Square Pkwy., Exton. 11/17. 10 am-4 pm. Bazaar and Craft Show Crafters, food, Santa, kid's crafts, raffles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1995 | By Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine the mesmerizing sight of the flames, smoke and molten glass. An artist plunges a long stainless-steel blowpipe into a 2,200-degree brick oven and turns it in a bright puddle of glass inside. Then, while the furnace roars like a jet engine, he withdraws a clear amber glob and blows into the pipe, as if resuscitating the inanimate sand, lime and potash. In minutes, a new creation takes shape. From the hot, lava-like glass emerges a thing of great beauty - a delicate flower, a human form, a graceful vase.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | By Marc Schogol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New York has the Lady with the Torch, but Philadelphia now is the keeper of liberty's flame. It is kept at the new National Liberty Museum at Third and Chestnut Streets, whose anti-hate, anti-violence, pro-harmony and pro-togetherness displays include the 20-foot-tall Flame of Liberty. This brilliant crimson pillar of glass tendrils, created by noted glass artist Dale Chihuly, and all the other artistic and historic homages to diversity and harmony will be on display starting next Wednesday, when the museum opens to the public.
NEWS
August 28, 1988 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's clear as glass that one of the top attractions in central New York is the Corning Glass Center - even if much of its glass is anything but clear. The center includes the Steuben Glass Factory, where visitors can see glass art being made; the Hall of Science and Industry, where they can learn about such futuristic glassy stuff as fiber optics, and the Corning Museum, which has the most comprehensive glass collection in the world - more than 24,000 objects. And from now through Oct. 23, the museum also will display the best private European collection of glass: the Ernesto Wolf Collection, which contains pieces from 1500 to 1800.
NEWS
July 1, 2002 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Although he admits he can't even draw a straight line, Louis Alberta nevertheless considers himself an artist. A hair artist, that is. "Hair is my passion," said Alberta, 31. "It is what I was born to do. " But another of his passions is art, whether oil portraits, landscapes, photography or sculpture. That led to a desire to open an art gallery to show off the works of his artist friends. "Everyone needs an outlet to display their work and hopefully get recognized," Alberta said.
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NEWS
January 10, 2013 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Walt Whitman, a train trip to the Jersey Shore was an adventure he relished. In 1878, the Camden bard wrote about it as part of a newspaper travelogue. "As I went to bed, it entered my head all of a sudden, decidedly yet quietly, that if the coming morn was fine, I would take a trip across Jersey by the Camden and Atlantic Railroad through to the sea," Whitman wrote in the Camden Daily Post on Jan. 20, 1879. The poet described rustic towns he saw from the open window of his railcar while musing about the railroad's impact on "modern democratic civilization.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
When Janai Dallas was younger, she spent Sunday mornings staring at the stained glass windows of New Covenant Church in Germantown. Babies. Angels. Jesus. She never thought about who made the windows or how they stuck those little panes of glass together. The images were just a colorful distraction from a boring sermon. That was before Dallas, 19, began spending Wednesday afternoons in the basement of a different church, learning to select, score, cut, grind, and solder glass into her own stained glass panels.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2012
Antiques/Art/Crafts 12th Annual Christmas Craft Fair and Bazaar More than 90 crafters selling handmade items, a wide range of cafe selections for breakfast & lunch, children's games, white elephant. Mother of Divine Providence School, 405 Allendale Rd., King of Prussia. 11/17. 9 am-3 pm. 2d Annual Craft Fair Handmade crafts displayed throughout the library & in the Struble Room. Chester County Library, 450 Exton Square Pkwy., Exton. 11/17. 10 am-4 pm. Bazaar and Craft Show Crafters, food, Santa, kid's crafts, raffles.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
Philadelphia philanthropists and art collectors Irvin J. Borowsky and Laurie Wagman have given more than $1 million to the Tyler School of Art's glass program, one of the largest gifts to a college glass program anywhere, Tyler officials said Wednesday. The bulk of the funds will be used to increase the capacity of Tyler's glass facility, located at the school on the Temple University North Philadelphia campus, and to bolster and promote its programs. The facility will be named the Irvin Borowsky Glass Studio, Temple officials said.
REAL_ESTATE
November 9, 2008 | By Christine Bahls FOR THE INQUIRER
In Michael and Amy Schunke's home in Chester County, the everyday drinking glasses are an original design. So is the round, raspberry-colored fruit platter that sits on the kitchen table. And the elegantly simple wine goblets placed on a cabinet. In their Victorian in West Grove, Michael Schunke, 39, an internationally known glass artist, harbors his own creations. These pieces have emotional meaning, like the tulip-shaped wine glass Amy calls her own, clear save for the copper-ruby lip wrap.
NEWS
August 12, 2007 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Matthew Olian is following in the footsteps of masters. He has traveled the globe to study with renowned glass artists to learn techniques that he incorporates into his own style. In his Cherry Hill studio, Olian, 23, prefers to use an open flame to make glass in all colors for earrings, pendants, letter openers, Venetian goblets and more. "It's challenging but rewarding," Olian said as he turned a long glass rod into a pendant in his studio. "I like using the torch because I don't need a team of people to work with me. " Pendants are among Olian's signature pieces.
NEWS
July 1, 2002 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Although he admits he can't even draw a straight line, Louis Alberta nevertheless considers himself an artist. A hair artist, that is. "Hair is my passion," said Alberta, 31. "It is what I was born to do. " But another of his passions is art, whether oil portraits, landscapes, photography or sculpture. That led to a desire to open an art gallery to show off the works of his artist friends. "Everyone needs an outlet to display their work and hopefully get recognized," Alberta said.
NEWS
January 5, 2000 | By Marc Schogol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New York has the Lady with the Torch, but Philadelphia now is the keeper of liberty's flame. It is kept at the new National Liberty Museum at Third and Chestnut Streets, whose anti-hate, anti-violence, pro-harmony and pro-togetherness displays include the 20-foot-tall Flame of Liberty. This brilliant crimson pillar of glass tendrils, created by noted glass artist Dale Chihuly, and all the other artistic and historic homages to diversity and harmony will be on display starting next Wednesday, when the museum opens to the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1998 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Running side by side with the Philadelphia Fringe Festival is Philadelphia Glass Week, which begins today and continues through Sept. 20 at a half-dozen local galleries. One of its prime attractions is an exhibition by Gene Koss at Tyler School of Art. Koss is showing sculptures he calls "gizmos," steel contraptions he designed to manipulate molten glass. The result of each manipulation is a contorted blob that becomes part of the sculpture. Koss grew up on a farm, so it's no coincidence that the dull gray gizmos evoke farm machinery.
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